Float pool, would I be in over my head? - page 3

Hey all, would like some advice from all of you! I was recently visiting one of the university hospitals and while trying to get directions to HR, was sent in the direction of the float pool... Read More

  1. Visit  emmasuern profile page
    0
    I would take the job. I didn't even have 10 shifts of orientation at my last two jobs. More like 5 to 6 and I was permanent staff. Some hospitals will even let you pick 3 units that you are willing to work. If you have a really bad shift you can tell someone in staffing that you are not going back to the floor that night. It will help you when you go to grad school. You will have a lot of different types of patients you have worked with and that is always a good thing. Once you are in the door at a really good facility it can open up other opportunities. I don't know what you plan to do with your MSN, but there may be an opportunity that is only open to internal hires. Good luck with your decision!
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  3. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    0
    This sounds absolutely fabulous and you sound like the kind of person who will make the best of it! What a great opportunity!
  4. Visit  uRNmyway profile page
    0
    Quote from GrnTea
    This sounds absolutely fabulous and you sound like the kind of person who will make the best of it! What a great opportunity!
    Thank you Grntea, from you that is a great compliment!
  5. Visit  30yearnurse4u profile page
    0
    In general, float pools require extensive nursing experience on many floors. Because of staffing problems, the trend has shifted to luring nurses into float pools, giving good benefits, and talking the float pool up as a good thing. A word of warning: the training you receive on some floors is none at all. They are so short staffed they simply need a body. This puts you at risk of your license. And generally, if you are offered a position on a floor you are uncomfortable with, and you refuse, your reputation just hit the skids, and they will say you "refused". This puts you in a very bad place with that organization. Your job is to ask about full training (6 weeks) on the floors to which you could be assigned. If they can't offer this, this means they have no training for you. This is about PATIENT SAFETY, and no nurse wants to be taking care of a patient when they lack the competency to do so. My advice is get good at one area first, at least 2 years experience. Then go to another area, if you wish, and get 2 years there. Get the fundamentals down, and be choosy about where float pools will send you. BTW, physicians absolutely hate working with nurses who are not experienced on their floors. They could complain to your manager and especially to their Medical Staff Chief. In summary, float is for experienced nurses only. Float pool nurses enjoy the variety while feeling competent at delivering care. Feeling incompetent in an area you don't have extensive knowledge about isn't worth the errors you could find yourself making, because you have no one as a preceptor.
  6. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    3
    Quote from 30yearnurse4u
    In general, float pools require extensive nursing experience on many floors. Because of staffing problems, the trend has shifted to luring nurses into float pools, giving good benefits, and talking the float pool up as a good thing. A word of warning: the training you receive on some floors is none at all. They are so short staffed they simply need a body. This puts you at risk of your license. And generally, if you are offered a position on a floor you are uncomfortable with, and you refuse, your reputation just hit the skids, and they will say you "refused". This puts you in a very bad place with that organization. Your job is to ask about full training (6 weeks) on the floors to which you could be assigned. If they can't offer this, this means they have no training for you. This is about PATIENT SAFETY, and no nurse wants to be taking care of a patient when they lack the competency to do so. My advice is get good at one area first, at least 2 years experience. Then go to another area, if you wish, and get 2 years there. Get the fundamentals down, and be choosy about where float pools will send you. BTW, physicians absolutely hate working with nurses who are not experienced on their floors. They could complain to your manager and especially to their Medical Staff Chief. In summary, float is for experienced nurses only. Float pool nurses enjoy the variety while feeling competent at delivering care. Feeling incompetent in an area you don't have extensive knowledge about isn't worth the errors you could find yourself making, because you have no one as a preceptor.
    Gross overstatement. And stop with the "risk to your license" thang. If the new float nurse isn't diverting narcs, committing felonious acts, or practicing impaired, this is a false threat. Don't believe me? Check the website for your state nursing board and see what the license actions are for. They aren't for "didn't do so great yet because I was new."
    uRNmyway, siRNita, and Daisy_08 like this.
  7. Visit  siRNita profile page
    0
    As a new grad float, I highly recommend floating for all the reasons other people have mentioned - variety, no politics, flexibility. I LOvE my job. You don't have to be an expert to be a good nurse. You just have to use your critical thinking skills and not be afraid to ask questions. I love float pool and have met a ton of great people and had a variety of patient experiences even in my relatively short career. Good luck!! And enjoy!!
  8. Visit  fostergirl1 profile page
    0
    If you are up for a challenge then I say go for it! I took a contingent job night shift after only one year out of nursing school with just med/surg experience. I worked my full time job doing med surg while working contingent in the float pool and learned all sorts of things. I floated back to the surgical icu and the medical/neuro icu as well as ED and Geri-psych. One night I even found myself smack dab in the middle of catch lab for an emergency cath gone bad. I too was working at a university hospital and saw tons of stuff and learned lots of things I otherwise would not have leaned! I have since had to quit there because it became too much to do both jobs as I finished my masters degree.so moral of the story, I say DO IT, it will be an awesome experience. As long as u get the proper training/orientation you should be fine. Go with your gu
  9. Visit  Vespertinas profile page
    0
    Quote from 30yearnurse4u
    And generally, if you are offered a position on a floor you are uncomfortable with, and you refuse, your reputation just hit the skids, and they will say you "refused". This puts you in a very bad place with that organization.........My advice is... be choosy about where float pools will send you.
    I'm pretty sure you just contradicted yourself.

    Your job is to ask about full training (6 weeks) on the floors to which you could be assigned. If they can't offer this, this means they have no training for you.
    No such thing.

    But... siRNita, I think doing float pool as a new grad is just nuts. It shouldn't be allowed. Not just for patients but for you too! You're being robbed of a solid foundation. If you feel comfortable in your position, I give you kudos for managing but I honestly think that you may not know what pieces you are missing.
  10. Visit  uRNmyway profile page
    2
    Well first formal interview done, according to recruiter went very well. She wants me to meet the night shift supervisor and recruiter next.
    I did have a misunderstanding for the orientation though. They offer 2 week for the hospital, policies, computer charting, etc. then it's 10 shifts overall training for the floors with extra, different training for mother baby.
    Like others said, I would not hang chemo, might have patients in for symptom control. If I had a patient on tele, charge nurse would check the strips and sign off on them.
    GrnTea and Vespertinas like this.
  11. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
    2
    I would go for it. If you find yourself in over your head just tell them and since you are already an employee they hopefully will work with you.
    uRNmyway and GrnTea like this.
  12. Visit  noreenl profile page
    1
    Congrats on Step 2. I did Float poolfor 4 years whilee i was the union rep for the nurses at my old hospital. it let me see who/what worked on each floor and where i definitely would not want to be without "friendly backup" if you want you can PM me anytime!
    uRNmyway likes this.
  13. Visit  JerseyGirl2010 profile page
    0
    Hey there uRNmyway,

    I'm loving this post. I was recently offered an interview for a Float Pool position. I am a new grad. I have 5 years experience as a Tele technician and I did a Student nurse externship at Bellevue hospital in NYC. Do you think I would be able to manage a position like this? I really like the idea of gaining experience in different areas and to be honest I get bored easily so this might just be a blessing in disguise...Thoughts?
    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks!
  14. Visit  ChristinaRNBSN profile page
    0
    I took a float pool position right out of nursing school. I've been a float for 2.5 years now. Looking back, it was the best position to take as a new grad because I gained massive amounts of experience in a short period of time. One of the best parts about being in the float pool is that, because of the different sitautions that you have come into contact with, you become a resource to other floors which may have not handeled a certain situation before. Floating teaches you how to be a leader and a resource. At our hospital, floats cover ER , Mother Baby, Geriatric psych, med-surg, and burn unit. We also help with admissions and discharges. Being well versed in all of these areas also prepares you to be a competent teacher down the road. Our hospital is a teaching hospital, and floating prepares you very well to orient new RNs or work with providers who may not be familiar with certain department protocols. You should go for it !


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