“I’m sick and I’m off” – “me too!” Flu!!!

  1. 2

    Cold and flu pull back many from working places and how to tackle this is matter- do hand hygiene....Every year, cold and flu outbreaks result in hundreds of missed office days for workers especially health care workers in hospital. The problem often stems from - when worker come to work place sick and spread germs via touch points.

    “I’m sick and I’m off” – “me too!” Flu!!!

    Every year, cold and flu outbreaks result in hundreds of missed office days for workers especially health care workers in hospital. The problem often stems from - when worker come to work place sick and spread germs via touch points. Influenza is a serious disease that can lead to hospitalization and sometimes even death. Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently, but millions of people get the flu every year, hundreds of thousands of people are hospitalized and thousands or tens of thousands of people die from flu-related causes every year. Even healthy people can get very sick from the flu and spread it to others.

    Often times germs, bacteria and viruses are found on doorknobs, keyboards, desks and railings. The threat of infections lurks on every surface workers touch, and on every door handle they open.

    That is why it is important to know how to prevent their spread. It means knowing what tools - soap or sanitizer - to offer and where.

    Hand sanitizers are best at killing micro organisms where hand washing helps to take out the micro organisms from our hand. Even though among this two, hand sanitizers are best in case of easy accessibility. But you can kill them, but science shows that those germs can repopulate pretty quickly. You never kill 100 percent of the germs when you're using hand sanitizer. So repeated hand hygiene is needed whenever possible.

    "Hand sanitizers are never a suitable replacement for washing your hands if your hand is visibly soiled.
    Along with, early recognition of your sickness and early medical advice always helps you and your work place to prevent further spread. If you recognized that you are sick – be away from others – seek medical advice. Say no for shake hands – even your friend can offer you FLU.

    Cleaner hands reduces the risk of cross-contamination and goes a long way in creating healthier facilities. In fact, a strong hand hygiene program can reduce absenteeism by a fairly significant number.

    The best way is always follow WHO's 5 moments of hand hygiene. i.e,
    • Before contact with patient
    • Before an aseptic/clean procedure
    • After contact with patient
    • After exposure with patient body fluids
    • After contact with a patients surroundings

    and 6 steps of hand hygiene...
    • Palm to palm (5 times)
    • Left palm over right dorsum (5 times)
    • Right palm over left dorsum (5 times)
    • Palm to palm with fingers interlaced (5 times)
    • The back of fingers to opposite palm – fingers interlocked (both hand)
    • Rotational rubbing of right thumb by the left palms (5 times)
    • Rotational rubbing of left thumb by the right palm (5 times)
    • Rotational rubbing of the tips of right fingers by the left palm (5 times)
    • Rotational rubbing of the left fingers by the right palm (5 times)

    Most importantly take your flu shot before you get sick with flu....

    Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine. The seasonal flu vaccine protects against the influenza viruses that research indicates will be most common during the upcoming season. Traditional flu vaccines (called "trivalent" vaccines) are made to protect against three flu viruses; an influenza A (H1N1) virus, an influenza A (H3N2) virus, and an influenza B virus. There are also flu vaccines made to protect against four flu viruses (called "quadrivalent" vaccines). These vaccines protect against the same viruses as the trivalent vaccine and an additional B virus.
    Remember - the vaccine should be new and if it's not - you may not be covered.
    Seek medical advice for the prophylaxis if it is necessary..
    Do you like this Article? Click Like?

  2. Visit Varghese John profile page

    About Varghese John, BSN, RN

    Infection Control Practitioner with certification in Infection Control (CIC)

    Varghese John has '5' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Infection control'. From 'Kearala'; Joined May '14; Posts: 6; Likes: 3.

    Read My Articles


close