Why is Army medic experience not valued for New Grads applying for ER jobs? Why is Army medic experience not valued for New Grads applying for ER jobs? - pg.3 | allnurses

Why is Army medic experience not valued for New Grads applying for ER jobs? - page 4

I am a recent graduate from a BSN program and have been trying desperately to find an ER job in Central Ohio. I have been an Army medic for over six years including a tour in Iraq as a flight medic.... Read More

  1. Visit  ecerrn profile page
    0
    I think the are some most excellent responses here, and at the risk of stating what I hear in your c/o, I will give you the truth in what I 'hear you saying that heck I have more experience than most of them! This is not a coveted attitude in the er. I have been, and worked with paramedic/firefighters as techs that all they wanted to do was the fun stuff and leave the wiping butts to the RN or someone else. Tiresome really. Are you willing to take a Med surg position where you can shine as an RN and get some good recommendations and after putting in the time, step into the er? We've all payed our dues one way or another. The veteran part is commendable, my father was a screaming eagle and jumped on d day so i got nothing but respect for our military.
  2. Visit  SunSurfRN profile page
    1
    Quote from becca001
    What some may be losing sight of is that Emergency Nursing is not just about trauma and codes. You've still got to be able to tell a STEMI from an anxiety attack, DKA from hyperglycemic, and numerous other issues. Personally, I think your background is a major plus but they might have policies against new grads in the ED. Not all hospitals are willing to percept new grads in critical care areas. Would you be willing to start out somewhere else in the hospital that you want to work at? Anything else catching your eye that you might want to do?
    I am a nurse in ER and in the navy reserve, so I work with corpsmen all the time. Personally I think they have a good skill set on trauma and first aid, however the ER Nurse has to deal with anything from the pt on dialysis with peaked T waves, the STEMI you need to get out to cath lab stat, the polite old lady who needs a Foley, the mean old man who is combative, the drug seeker/alcoholic, the DKA of course, the list goes on and on. In combat, you are dealin with mostly young people with wounds/trauma - operative word being young. In ERs here stateside its all ages, all kinds of problems - some subtle. Don't get me started on pediatric pts or neonates.
    wooh likes this.
  3. Visit  CrunchRN profile page
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    The only thing I can think of is maybe they are intimidated and/or feel you may not be, ahem, malleble enough?
  4. Visit  HM-8404 profile page
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    Quote from SunSurfRN
    I am a nurse in ER and in the navy reserve, so I work with corpsmen all the time. Personally I think they have a good skill set on trauma and first aid, however the ER Nurse has to deal with anything from the pt on dialysis with peaked T waves, the STEMI you need to get out to cath lab stat, the polite old lady who needs a Foley, the mean old man who is combative, the drug seeker/alcoholic, the DKA of course, the list goes on and on. In combat, you are dealin with mostly young people with wounds/trauma - operative word being young. In ERs here stateside its all ages, all kinds of problems - some subtle. Don't get me started on pediatric pts or neonates.
    Many Corpsmen work in base hospitals and deal with all the patients you just described. They are not combat only. While on shore duty I dealt with service members from 17-60, their wives, kids and also retirees. We also deal with all types of patients during humanitarian missions. Navy Corpsmen and Army/AF Medics do more than treat bullet wounds on 20 yr olds. Find an IDC Corpsman in your Reserve unit and ask what they did on Active Duty.
  5. Visit  SunSurfRN profile page
    0
    Quote from HM-8404
    Many Corpsmen work in base hospitals and deal with all the patients you just described. They are not combat only. While on shore duty I dealt with service members from 17-60, their wives, kids and also retirees. We also deal with all types of patients during humanitarian missions. Navy Corpsmen and Army/AF Medics do more than treat bullet wounds on 20 yr olds. Find an IDC Corpsman in your Reserve unit and ask what they did on Active Duty.
    I know Corpsmen are in hospitals, on the Blue side. On the green side I hear different stories altogether. As far as the Army I cannot speak to that topic at all. It doesn't make a difference if they are in hospitals, until the responsibility is 100% on your shoulders, its not the same to me.
  6. Visit  evansmum profile page
    1
    First off, there has been some REALLY excellent advice in this thread!

    OP, don't let this get you down or deter your ambitions to work in the ED. I am also a former combat medic in the Army, and a recent ADN grad in Florida (Post 9-11 GI bill, thank you!). I live in the Tampa Bay region and have had the absolute worst time getting interviews. When I was transitioning to the civilian sector, I thought that I would have no problem getting my foot into the door with my experience from the military. Boy, was I wrong! I couldn't even land an unlicensed CNA position! I was like, are you KIDDING ME?! It is what it is. I focused on school, and was grateful for the opportunity to get paid to continue higher education.

    When it came time to building my resume, I highlighted my military experience next to my graduate nurse qualifications. I'm humble, but I have to joke that I feel like I sound so much better on paper than I come off in person, haha. That aside, there ARE facilities who appreciate this type of experience! I was prompted by an old NCO (who also became an RN after her service) to apply at a local hospital near my old duty station. Mind you, this is about 1000 miles away. I applied to only ER and ICU, as these were the only two departments that would prompt me to relocate. I didn't think I had a chance in hell. Two days later I received an email requesting a phone interview with their talent recruiter regarding my ICU app. After speaking with her for an hour, she suggested that I would be wonderful for their ED! I literally screamed in excitement when I got off the phone. The next day, another hour-long phone interview with the ED manager. It was blissful I was asked to come shadow the department, and traveled up that weekend to do so. I was a nervous wreck on the inside, but I have a stellar poker face compliments of the military (everyone remarks upon my composure, and yet I am just as nervous as any other new grad). It was a fantastic experience! It enticed me even more, as I long for the fast-paced, critical nature of the ED.

    On my drive home I was contacted again to say that I was being offered a FT position in their ED....it is also a level II trauma facility. I am leaving Florida in only a few weeks to begin! I am over the moon, and the envy of many of my peers right now. My best advice is to look into relocation. Apply to facilities near military bases, as these are more likely to favor and appreciate your experience. Having a BSN is a total bonus, and I am SHOCKED that no one as picked you up yet. You are a gem; believe it.

    You will prevail! No worries. Best of luck in your endeavors, and many wishes for a rewarding and successful career!
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
  7. Visit  ED_Chris_RN profile page
    1
    I am sorry for what you are going through. When I was in nursing school I had two former Army medics in my class and a bunch of Navy Corpsman (Military Area). I learned a lot of valuable things from these people, especially when it came to triage and EKG reading, but by far the most valuable was skills. They had a lot of tricks for getting IV's started and a wide array of other things which I will always remember. As a veteran myself, I would hire you in a heartbeat!
    FMF Corpsman likes this.
  8. Visit  FMF Corpsman profile page
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    Congratulations on your new position, I have no doubts you will do an outstanding job.
  9. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
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    Sorry this is off topic but there seems to be a lot of corpsmen and medics reading this thread. For their interest:
    http://allnurses.com/government-mili...me-270082.html
  10. Visit  FMF Corpsman profile page
    3
    First off, I believe our medics and corpsman to be of more honorable stock than to apply for a position that they are less than qualified for. Having been stationed in a war zone, most will not have been assigned to the "band-aid brigade," or as you labeled them "hand out Motrin and tell them to drink water." Secondly, wouldn't anyone being hired for these positions be required to undergo an orientation process the same as any new hire to any of the units? Any shortcomings would most certainly be evident within a very limited period of time. I'm not saying these men and women deserve any special consideration, but they most assuredly do deserve every consideration. They are every bit as qualified as any 3 or 4 year nurse coming in and applying for a job and much more so in many considerations. As some have noted, they are not going to freeze up in a trauma or be afraid to jump in when someone needs to jump, and those are the people I need in my ER. The book stuff I can get through, I need experience. So, Welcome home all you guys and thanks for your service.
    Ristosix, HM-8404, and gypsyd8 like this.
  11. Visit  Ristosix profile page
    2
    This is a dated thread, but I decided to bump it because the issue touches home and I'm writing my Resume' as of this moment. There is a lot of great advice, for those of you who haven't had the chance working as a medic in the service it's outlined as such:

    The stage is set with one Provider generally a PA, that is holding a practice license that we honestly soak up as much as we can. After that there is a group of about 20 enlisted team members (medics) that have at the base EMT-B and maybe one or two with some ACLS, they play all types of roles in the patient care setting from triage to left-side table-documentation-airway management-package and handoff to dust-off. The goal is to care for at point of injury --> stabilize --> move to higher echelon of care. The majority of the facilities are made with sandbags plywood and have a grounded generator thats filled every twelve hours. 24 shifts are normal, showers are a luxury, and we generally run on coffee and gatorade.
    Inside the walls we erected we have anywhere from 2-6 beds setup with crash-carts. We have the capabilities of managing airways with blind insertions / intubating, bleeding control, Infections, IV-Therapy, Hypothermia, Poisoning, DKA, ACLS, PALS, Abdominal Wounds, and very grosse-damage-control-exploratory surgery. Most facilities are not boxed sealed and sterile, which leads to drugs, a guerilla set of antibiotics, alphas, betas, OPIODS, NSAIDS, fungal, bacterial, epi, sedatives, the list goes on. Take a few tough-boxes and a couple of guys in the middle of nowhere and you have a glorified Level IV Trauma Urgent Care.

    That sounds all and wonderful, but what we don't have most of the time is the luxury of this on our backs, as we go fumble around in the mud with a group of 40 individuals that we are responsible of care for. I was attached to an infantry unit I had the pleasure of knowing each of my potential patients personal lives / their families, managing there vaccines to OMG SHTF woah!, how'd that happen. Most of which is ditch medicine / how can this tool be used for three different scenarios. We provide some pretty top notch medicine with little to nothing for equipment, an EKG? HA! Thats a god send, I'm lucky if I have a source of O2 during a penetrating chest injury.

    Congrats...I've done it, and I'm one of the many like you. That doesn't mean were hot ****, or that we can even puff out our chests. We have another tool-set that we can bring to the team, which in itself...is nerves of steel during the most chaotic moments. I dont think I need to paint a picture...we save some, we lose some, and we never give up on any. The average person won't be able to comprehend this because they haven't experienced it themselves, don't be so ignorant to try and make them comprehend what we've done or will do...don't ever wish such a thing on someone. Be humble that you've been blessed with the ability to bring what you know to a team who can thrive and learn from you, but thats not all of it. Learn, you were given two ears and one mouth...do the math. RISTOSIX / OUT.
    PMFB-RN and FutureRN-GA like this.

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