Obama Declares Swine Flu a National Emergency - page 2

WASHINGTON President Barack Obama declared the swine flu outbreak a national emergency and empowered his health secretary to suspend federal requirements and speed treatment for thousands of infected people. The declaration... Read More

  1. 1
    Personally, I find it appalling that they're requesting/recommending pregnant women and children get it first. Guinea pigs eh? I'm 9 months pregnant and both my midwife and OB told me NOT to get it b/c there hasn't been enough testing; and quite frankly, I wouldn't get it anyway. Too much media hype, too much attention being drawn to this instead of ways OTHER THAN a "shot" to protect you. How come we always think of "medicinal" ways to protect ourselves versus through other "non-medicinal" ways first? Have we ever thought about current medicines that already suppress peoples immune systems, thereby making them more susceptible to dying from the flu? Probably not. There are plenty of drugs that children are on (asthma inhalers) that already suppress their immune system, making them more susceptible to getting pneumonia b/c their own immune systems are already suppressed. I'm only throwing out one example.

    I smell profit over patient safety yet again. Yes, I'm a bit skeptical as I always am. Especially when we know there is such a LARGE profit to be made off of fear!
    Last edit by CityKat on Oct 25, '09
    Pat_Pat RN likes this.

    Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  2. 1
    I don't think this is a national emergency. More people have died from Influenza than H1N1. Anyhow, I'm not getting that vaccine. It hasn't been tested enough and I don't trust it.
    Pat_Pat RN likes this.
  3. 0
    Does anybody know how we are differentiating between H1N1 and the "regular" flu? If they have stopping doing confirmatory tests, do they do a prelim that can tell what kind? I seem to remember a friend whose daughter had it. They told her they could not give her an official diagnosis with the test they did, but that it was the same class (or something) as the H1N1, which differs from the current "regular" one going around. Do the symptoms differ?
  4. 0
    Quote from Charity
    Does anybody know how we are differentiating between H1N1 and the "regular" flu? If they have stopping doing confirmatory tests, do they do a prelim that can tell what kind? I seem to remember a friend whose daughter had it. They told her they could not give her an official diagnosis with the test they did, but that it was the same class (or something) as the H1N1, which differs from the current "regular" one going around. Do the symptoms differ?

    They have not completely stopped doing confirmatory tests. Hospitalized patients and those presenting to sentinel reporting hospitals are having the rRT-PCR to confirm H1N1. Dr's offices and some hospitals are using the rapid influenza tests but the CDC recognizes that these tests have a high rate of false negatives (10-70% accurate) and they may or may not be able to distinguish between type A or B influenza and they certainly cannot subtype if it is H1N1. Clinicians therfore are advised to treat empirically bazed on the constellation of symptoms.

    Quote from CDC
    Rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) are widely available but have variable sensitivity3 (range 10 70%) for detecting 2009 H1N1 influenza when compared with real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), and a negative RIDT result does not rule out influenza virus infection4 . RIDTs have a high specificity5 (>95%6). Depending on which commercially available RIDT is used,the test can either i) detect and distinguish between influenza A and B viruses; or ii) detect both influenza A and B but not distinguish between influenza A and B viruses. More information on sensitivity, specificity and interpretation of RIDT results can be found athttp://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance/rapid_testing.htm.
    http://cdc.gov/h1n1flu/guidance/diagnostic_tests.htm


    As of October 17, 2009:

    Quote from CDC
    All subtyped influenza A viruses being reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
    http://cdc.gov/flu/weekly/
    Last edit by HonestRN on Oct 25, '09 : Reason: add link
  5. 0
    Our urgent care center is overwhelmed with the number of patients coming in with flu-like symptoms. We have been averaging 3 hour waits to be seen for the last 2 weeks. What has changed in the federal guidelines that will help us get these patients through more quickly? We had to reduce our staff earlier this year d/t the economic climate and are now totally in over our heads with no help available.


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top