Diabetes and Charcot foot

  1. 0 In this brief description of Charcot foot and diabetes, there is mention of neuropathic ulcers that resemble a "BB shot"

    what does a BB shot look like?
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    Visit  GingerSue profile page

    About GingerSue

    GingerSue has '20' year(s) of experience. From 'Canada'; Joined Oct '04; Posts: 1,973; Likes: 249.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  morte profile page
    1
    Quote from GingerSue
    In this brief description of Charcot foot and diabetes, there is mention of neuropathic ulcers that resemble a "BB shot"

    what does a BB shot look like?
    i have just spent about 1/2 hour looking for a picture of this condition...no luck.....BB's are small, i am taking a guess, 4/5 mm in size and round...trying to remember if a BB gun shoots more than one at a time, if so the reference may be to a pattern of small wounds?
    good luck
    GingerSue likes this.
  4. Visit  GingerSue profile page
    0
    this is what I found in Podiatry Today in their article about Charcot foot and ulcer:

    is this what a BB shot looks like?
  5. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    cant say i ever saw the wound from a BB, only the pellets themselves,lol....but notice how round the two wounds are? the bigger one, the o.a. isnt but the surrounding area is....by the way you can click on the pictures to enlarge,(just in case you didnt pick up on that)
  6. Visit  GingerSue profile page
    0
    how to enlarge?
    I can see the little magnifying glass icon

    when I left click - it puts the same small picture onto its own screen

    when I right click - it presents a menu of "email, print, etc"

    where do I click for enlarge?
  7. Visit  Angie O'Plasty, RN profile page
    1
    http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=24202951&size=m

    Can't get the picture to come up, but here's a picture of a single BB. They're very small in actual size.



    Here's a picture of Charcot-Marie-Tooth feet, one of which has a sore. Looking carefully at the wound, there's a small area that looks round and bumped-out a little bit, and I think that might be the area that most resembles a BB. Here's the link to that site:
    http://www.gfmer.ch/genetic_diseases...t.php?cat3=842
    Last edit by Angie O'Plasty, RN on Aug 12, '07
    GingerSue likes this.
  8. Visit  GingerSue profile page
    0
    these feet are very interesting to learn about.

    this is also what i discovered (from epodiatry.com):
    charcot foot and charcot-marie-tooth foot are different:

    "charcot's foot is a complication of diabetes that almost always occurs in those with neuropathy (nerve damage). when neuropathy is present, the bones in the foot become weakened and can fracture easily, even without there being any major trauma. as the neuropathy is present, the pain goes unnoticed and the person continues to walk on it. this can lead to severe deformities of the foot. as this can be very disabling, early diagnosis and treatment is vitally important.
    another way to consider it - imagine spraining your ankle and not knowing you have done this. you will continue to walk on it - imagine the damage that this would do. this is what happens in a charcot foot.
    the charcot's foot should not be confused with the foot deformity that can occur in those with charcot-marie-tooth disease - they are very different conditions."
  9. Visit  Angie O'Plasty, RN profile page
    1
    Gee, I didn't know that, Gingersue. I always love to learn new things.

    Maybe this link will help? I found it under "charcot arthropathy"

    http://www.podassociates.net/podassociates_web_011.htm


    Here's another one:

    http://www.mamc.amedd.army.mil/refer...oot_images.htm
    Last edit by Angie O'Plasty, RN on Aug 12, '07
    GingerSue likes this.
  10. Visit  GingerSue profile page
    1
    this is very interesting to see how they do a capsulotomy,
    and this is what the ulcer looks like:

    Angie O'Plasty, RN likes this.
  11. Visit  Angie O'Plasty, RN profile page
    0
    I think the red thing at about 11 o'clock in the picture sure looks like the BB you were asking about in the first post.

    I've seen this type of ulcer before, just didn't know it had a special name. Good thread. Thanks!
  12. Visit  morte profile page
    0
    hmm go back to your original citation , when you "roll over" the picture hit the enter key i have a lap top, no mouse....i didnt right or left click just hit the pad.....and it enlarged.....but the last picture probably will do...
    hmm enter doesnt work, havent used a mouse in so long,,,,what is the mouse equivalent of the lap top pad?
    Last edit by morte on Aug 12, '07
  13. Visit  GingerSue profile page
    0
    Quote from morte
    hmm go back to your original citation , when you "roll over" the picture hit the enter key i have a lap top, no mouse....i didnt right or left click just hit the pad.....and it enlarged.....but the last picture probably will do...
    hmm enter doesnt work, havent used a mouse in so long,,,,what is the mouse equivalent of the lap top pad?
    when I go back to the little picture of Charcot foot, using my mouse to position the arrow over the picture - the little magnifying glass appears - I click on "enter" (to see what'll happen) and - it provides the entire article (from which I copied the picture). Very neat.

    but I still can't enlarge the image (I know how to do this on pictures that have been saved on a Word document), but it doesn't work on this image. How does that little magnifying glass work?

    On my lap top, the mouse equivalent is a little green button on the keyboard (but it'll only work if the mouse is disconnected)
  14. Visit  classicdame profile page
    0
    What Dr. Charcot described was a "bag of bones" . The foot will be misshappen due to multiple mini-fractures. The neuropathy prevents the patient from feeling pain soon enough to get help before the foot gets misshappen. Have no idea what the BB shot is all about.


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