CNS! Is this a Dying Specialty!? - page 6

by Visuals 17,733 Views | 60 Comments

Okay guys, What's the deal with this specialty? 1) Is there a demand? 2) Anybody currently practicing wished they had done NP instead? 3) Anybody currently praciticing love they job? why?.....Hate it? why? 4) With... Read More


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    TramaRUs, you may be right but if you look into schools, more credits have been added to the CNS curriculum. In the job market it might not be competitive as the NP, just like the Nursing Education is not. Some states dont hire CNS, fine, but some states still do. I just think Nursing body as a whole is missing the point of nursing especially ANCC. CNS will be for a long time.
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    I just don't see how you can state that the CNS will be around a long time.

    With the advent of the Consensus Model from ANCC, the writing is on the wall that CNS will be going the way of the Model T.

    Even as far back as 1996, there was concern about the future role of the CNS:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8707512
  3. 0
    Can you tell me a Masters degree that really really focuses on "Nursing"? Is there any?
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    Quote from traumaRUs
    I just don't see how you can state that the CNS will be around a long time.

    With the advent of the Consensus Model from ANCC, the writing is on the wall that CNS will be going the way of the Model T.

    Even as far back as 1996, there was concern about the future role of the CNS:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8707512
    I just looked at the link you pasted. The research article abstract is all I could read, and I'll say its already 'biased' from just the abstract. Its also dated 1996, thats too old. Not enough to base a jugdement on.
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    i'm a cns in il (northern chicagoland) and i know we are always looking for good cnss. especially individuals who are able to research and implement best practices in our hospitals while working with both medical and nursing staffs to certify that patients are getting the best care possible. cnss are invaluable assets that serve as the bridge between patients, nursing, medical, and administration. in my opinion, cns and nps are very different and i can't see them going anywhere anytime soon.
    elkpark and enoRN like this.
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    Eno - I did mention that it was an older article and gave the date. What I see in my area (central IL) is that CNSs are being phased out in favor of the CNL. The CNSs that I know (and I am a member of the our state's APN organization) are all mid-level practitioners, not working in the true CNS role.

    Hi Wabbot and welcome to AN. I too live in IL, however, I'm more out in the cornfields.

    I have been an adult CNS since 2006 and a peds CNS since 2010. I work in a specialty practice as an APN alongside 2 FNPS, 2 PAs and me. We all do the same exact job.

    In my area the CNL is taking over the "true" CNS role. All the CNSs that I know and work with are like me - APNs.

    I feel that I am a nurse first, then an APN. I just see my role more now as an APN, though I'm a very proud RN too.
    enoRN likes this.
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    I see the CNL role taking over the role once held by the CNS's -- and I was one of the "old" CNS's back in the early 1980's. There was no role confustion between NP's and CNS's back then ... no talk of combining the roles or of APN's who tried to straddle the 2 roles. You were either a CNS focusing on the provision of nursing care and supporting staff nurses in their work -- or you were an NP, providing care in a "physician extender role." Things got really messy when people started trying to combine and bridge the 2 different types of roles and no one has cleaned it up.

    Then the schools came up with the CNL programs (for reasons too numerous and complicated to go into here). That provided an alternative role for those people who wanted the traditional CNS role. The CNL role has not caught on everywhere ... but it is the way that the university educators are going. It's not a "done deal" yet, but that seems to be where things are headed.

    Me? I ended up in Nursing Professional Development (which used to be called "staff development"). My old CNS education included staff education in its curriculum and I got plenty of experience in it as a CNS for 14 years. So, I got certified in NPD and claim that as my new role --- NPD Specialist. I adapted.
    SHGR likes this.
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    Yep llg - we have all adapted in different ways. I respect you and your posts very much.

    So, what we have here is that those of us in the "field" (working) have all had to adapt to whatever role we were hired into.

    Eno - are you working as a CNS now? In what role.

    Wabbot - same question to you: Are you a CNS and if so, what certifications do you both hold?

    Just curious since the adult CNS is being "retired" but traumarus has gotta work till I die - lol.
  9. 0
    Quote from traumaRUs
    Yep llg - we have all adapted in different ways. I respect you and your posts very much.

    So, what we have here is that those of us in the "field" (working) have all had to adapt to whatever role we were hired into.

    Eno - are you working as a CNS now? In what role.

    Wabbot - same question to you: Are you a CNS and if so, what certifications do you both hold?

    Just curious since the adult CNS is being "retired" but traumarus has gotta work till I die - lol.
    I'm not working yet, I'm still in school. actually 2nd year, and I really need some encouragement from you guys, even though I respect the fact that you must tell the truth the way it is out there in terms of jobs.
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    enoRN- I just started CNS school. I am not worried about job opportunities. I may have to relocate or just be patient however there is going to be a need. I frequent the wanted ads and see CNS jobs nationwide and locally too.

    I absolutely love this role and believe in it wholeheartedly. I want to advocate it and promote it. Something I plan on strongly pursuing after graduation.

    My main concern is the role being replaced by CNL in terms of schools closing their CNS programs and opening up CNL programs. The CNL is not an advanced practice nurse so I am hoping that CNS will not be lost because of this. I plan on advocating for the role once I get out of school and getting involved with exposing the role to staff nurses and to new nurses.

    You may want to go to the National Clinical Nurse Specialist website at nacns.org and look at their, "listserve," you will get a plethora of ideas about the new APRN regulations and the CNS role viability.

    There is an organization called, "Society for Clinical Nurse Specialist Education," at SCNSE.org that was developed to advance the CNS education and preserve the role viability. I haven't joined it yet- I have joined three organizations and the dues add up plus trying to get certification for my CNN but I think I just may go on ahead and join it.

    --Jaime
    SHGR and enoRN like this.


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