Which "psychomotor skills" presented the greatest challenge for you...

  1. to master. I think this is my weakest area both with regard to regular nursing and my CRNA aspirations. Does anyone have any advice on good videos or other training materials that might be helpful? Perhaps, I can obtain a headstart on some of the tricky ones giving myself a fighting chance when I'm put on the spot under pressure during school.
    •  
  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   alansmith52
    I am not quite sure what your talking about.
    if you mean starting lines or intubating. I think those things come with practice.
    matt
  4. by   Qwiigley
    I don't quite get what you mean either. If you want to polish your skills, polish time management, putting in IVs on dehydrated pts and sharpen your assessment skills.
    Understand fluid and electrolyte balance, hone up on cardiac meds and drips. Get a anatomy book on the head and know CSF production and drainage. Know the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system like you were teaching the class.
    That should keep you busy awhile!
    (currenly in school);
    Qwiigs
  5. by   Roland
    I am a klutz. I have always been clumsy and probably always will be to an extent. Furthermore, "motor skills" have always presented a challenge for me (I was ten before I could tie my own shoes). "Book learning" on the other hand is generally not an issue. I tend to score in the 99% percentile on most tests of that type. Therefore, I see my biggest weakness as being those things which require coordination. Now other than jumping rope or playing with my really old electronic "Operation" game I don't know how to "exercise" my brain in order to maximize whatever psychomotor abilities I DO have. Thus, I am seeking to enhance areas of my brain such as the supplementary motor cortex, premotor cortex, and primary motor cortex with activities conducive to that outcome. There is evidence that the brain retains a considerable degree of plasticity even into a ripe old age such as mine (witness those people who recover significant function after a stroke or other severe brain trauma).
  6. by   Brenna's Dad
    I think the game of "Operation" is a great idea!!

    Or perhaps you might consider playing video games. It has been said, that it teaches you excellent hand-eye coordination.

    Truly though, in the psychomotor department, I can't see anesthesia as being any harder than your current nursing practice.

Must Read Topics


close