pursuing CRNA school acceptance- help - page 4

Can anyone help me find a school for CRNA ? I have looked at about all of them(AANA page= 95 schools) and quite frankly I'm getting dizzy! I have : 13 years as an EMT 6 years as a... Read More

  1. Visit  traumasrna profile page
    0
    Swimmingduck, I attend Samuel Merritt College's CRNA program and I do not believe we offer a 6 month certificate program. Anesthesia principle classes have to be taken along with pathophysiology classes and pharmacology classes and we must not forget the OR time that has to be met. You have to have X amount of cases and hours completed.
  2. Visit  framps profile page
    0
    Quote from traumacrna
    Swimmingduck, I attend Samuel Merritt College's CRNA program and I do not believe we offer a 6 month certificate program. Anesthesia principle classes have to be taken along with pathophysiology classes and pharmacology classes and we must not forget the OR time that has to be met. You have to have X amount of cases and hours completed.

    Samuel Merritt does offer a post masters certificate program...

    from their website:
    A Post-Masters Certificate
    For those students who have already completed a masters degree in nursing, we offer a post-masters certificate program. The curriculum is the same as that taken by other students with the exception that 12 hours in core nursing classes and thesis/research need not be taken (given verification of transferable /comparable units from another institution). Each student's transcript is evaluated individually to determine if they are qualified for this option. This option has been approved by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Programs.

    I'm thinking its more like 18 months long since you transfer in 12 hours of the 53 you have to take.
  3. Visit  DreamweaverSRNA profile page
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    Framps,

    You have misinterpreted the Samuel Merritt website.

    If you already have a MSN, that degree can't be granted twice. You can't be an MSN-MSN. So, some programs have a post-masters option, which gives you a post-masters certificate. In most cases, the core graduate level nursing classes you took for your first MSN (like theory, health politics, etc) can be used in place of the 3 core classes for the CRNA program if they are similar in content.
    So, you get out of those three courses, but the length of the program and all the other requirements are exactly the same. 27 months. The tuition is less expensive, though, since there are less units to take to get the certificate. Samuel Merritt uses a comprehensive senior exam process now, not a thesis, so it is really 9 less units. That's still over $6300 in tuition saved, though.

    Not meaning to slam anyone here. Just providing the facts that I got first hand when I was researching schools. The only way to get a CRNA degree, even if you already have an MSN, is to put in the time and hard work, just like everyone else. No shortcuts to the end.
    Last edit by DreamweaverSRNA on Apr 9, '05
  4. Visit  karengr profile page
    0
    Quote from mlittle
    what schools allowed a GPA of 2.7? I am wondering because I am thinking of applying to CRNA school and I do not have a GPA of a 3.0. I went and spoke with a graduate advisor today and she was telling me that experience does matter too and during the interview process if you let the board know how hard you have work and how hard you are curretnly woring to get where you are today that is taken into consideration as well. Good Luck!
    Check out the Charleston Area Medical Center (CMAC School of Nurse Anesthesia) at www.camcinstitute.org/anesthesia/admission.htm . They require a minimum overall GPA of 2.8 and are located in West Virginia. They require a minimum combined score of 860 on the GRE.

    I'm an LPN who is going through the Excelsior RN program with the intention of earning my MSN, so I'm keeping my GPA at 3.0 or above. For the last two years my GPA has been hovering around 3.4. My GPA 20 years ago was only about 2.0 - but then, I also had to work FT while going to school FT, since there was no part-time program in my area at that time. I've always thought a 2.0 was pretty darn good given that I was working 40+ hours a week, only slept 3-4 hours a night, and had no life! I used to hear pt. call lights while lying in bed at night! I studied by folding my notes into my pocket and reviewing them while standing in elevators, waiting for a pt. to use the bedpan, etc.

    I'm so glad we have more options for getting an education today! I also work for a nursing agency, giving me greater flexibility as far as my work time is concerned. I get A's and B's today because my life is totally different than it was 20 years ago. Oh, I almost forgot - I'm also not having to deal with an abusive boyfriend these days!

    I've spoken with graduate schools and have been told they wouldn't even consider my grades from 20 years ago, if my GPA for the past 2 years or more has been 3.4. They only consider your most recent work. I recommend people take a couple classes, show they can get A's or B's, and bring that to the forefront during the application process.
  5. Visit  karengr profile page
    0
    [QUOTE=karengr]Check out the Charleston Area Medical Center (CMAC School of Nurse Anesthesia) at www.camcinstitute.org/anesthesia/admission.htm . They require a minimum overall GPA of 2.8 and are located in West Virginia. They require a minimum combined score of 860 on the GRE. . .

    Check out Old Dominion University CRNA program in Hampton Rds area of VA. Their site says: "Overall GPA 3.00 based on a 4.00 scale- we will look at trends for those who were not focused in their early years of study"

    Again, if your GPA is below 2.9, take a couple classes and get A's. Good Luck!
  6. Visit  nitro23 profile page
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    I don't think GPA is the only factor. I think the total package is more important. I heard of a school who accepted a student with a 2.7 gpa even though they wanted a 3.0. He just happened to have the other things they were looking for.
  7. Visit  CRNARAY profile page
    0
    Quote from traumacrna
    Swimmingduck, I attend Samuel Merritt College's CRNA program and I do not believe we offer a 6 month certificate program. Anesthesia principle classes have to be taken along with pathophysiology classes and pharmacology classes and we must not forget the OR time that has to be met. You have to have X amount of cases and hours completed.
    I am starting the Samuel Merritt CRNA program this fall, I was wondering if you had any words of advice...good or bad.I generally hear from current SRNA that I should enjoy life before the program starts. Someone told me I should freshen up on anatomy/physilology/patho...
    Any words of advice would be greatly appreciated.
  8. Visit  traumasrna profile page
    0
    CRNARAY or is it Ray? I am Ramon. Look, you will be studying your %ss off for the next 27 months, my advice, have fun, enjoy yourself. You don't want to burn out. Everything you'll need to know for the first semester they will teach you. I.e. gross anatomy is fun, theory is painful, but's it's a four day weekend intensive, pharmacology from what I here isn't bad and principals in anesthesia is just a lot of reading and studying. I am a three year student, so I just finished my first year and got the core classes out of the way. I will be in class with you in pharm and principals, let me know if I can help with anything.

    Ramon

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