Everyone who can please respond. Route question

  1. I am so unsure on what to do right now. I am currently in my first quarter for pre reqs as an LPN. I have two children and I am married. I want to go to work asap. I have called local university's and college to see about bridge programs, I will be finished with LPN in 2004 then bridge to RN while working as and LPN. that will take 1 1/2 years then bridge from RN to BSN in 2 years. THen apply to CRNA school.. My question is should I just go on now and maybe work as a CNA or Patient Tech or Phlebotomist and just pursue my BSN full time to get it in 3 1/2 years? The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Nurse Coordinator is calling me in a few days to let me know her opinions on what to do. What does everyone here think? the CRNA program here is 27 months. THanks
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   lpnga
    I also can not get my HOPE scholarship if I go into a BSN program vs. ADN. That is the only way I am going to school. Thanks
  4. by   kmchugh
    Originally posted by lpnga
    I am so unsure on what to do right now. I am currently in my first quarter for pre reqs as an LPN. I have two children and I am married. I want to go to work asap. I have called local university's and college to see about bridge programs, I will be finished with LPN in 2004 then bridge to RN while working as and LPN. that will take 1 1/2 years then bridge from RN to BSN in 2 years. THen apply to CRNA school.. My question is should I just go on now and maybe work as a CNA or Patient Tech or Phlebotomist and just pursue my BSN full time to get it in 3 1/2 years? The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Nurse Coordinator is calling me in a few days to let me know her opinions on what to do. What does everyone here think? the CRNA program here is 27 months. THanks
    First, lets look at time requirements.
    -For the program you outline, it will take you until what, January 2004 to get your LPN.

    -Then you will probably start ADN in June or Aug 2004, waiting till you can apply. A year and a half later makes it January 2006 when you finish that.

    -Then, you can work as an RN in a critical care unit while finishing that requirement while you get your BSN, starting in May or August 2006, completing the program two years later, in May 2008.

    -Since you have fulfilled the requirements for CRNA school, you can immediately apply. Assuming you are accepted immediately, you would start in June or August 2008, and finish sometime in 2010.

    So, by the program you have outlined, you are looking at a minimum of 8 years before you become a CRNA. The other route gets you your RN in 3 1/2 years. So you are an RN, BSN in 2006. Then, one year critical care experience, then application to CRNA school in 2007. Two more years school, you finish in 2009. So, the more direct route cuts one year off your time to your final goal, if I have done the math right.

    But, I realize there are other considerations. You have not told us whether your spouse works or not, but if they do, can they support the family while you are in school? In other words, can you and your family get by on what your spouse makes, with what you make part time as a phlebotomist or CNA while in school? And remember, CRNA school is VERY busy, and most folks give up trying to work at all while in a program. So, you need to plan for that, as well.

    Check with the university advisor. There are a bunch of scholarships out there for RN programs as well, and I think the next year to three years will see those numbers rise drastically because of the nursing shortage. I'm not sure what the HOPE scholarship is, but it ain't the only game in town.

    Kevin McHugh, CRNA
    Last edit by kmchugh on Sep 6, '02
  5. by   lpnga
    Thanks Kevin I was hoping to have you answer me. I have done that math and and came up with the same thing you did. Hope is for Georgia residents with a gpa of 3.0 or higher. It pays everything except books. My husband work and I do not work now so we are fine there. The only thing that concerns me is school. I want to make sure I am understanding that is why I was going to go the long route because each additional year or degree i go up I am getting a little more in depth of whats I already know. TO me that was one good advantage. Thanks
  6. by   AL bug
    Ipnga,
    I deduce from your last post that you want to do the shorter route but want some confirmation of whether you will be able to stay focused and mentally absorb all you need to to reach the final goal. I think it is possible for you to get the foundation you need by doing the LPN to BSN bridge.

    I usually feel like the non-nursing advocate for the site, but another option you may check out is bridging LPN to ADN and getting BS in biology, chemistry, etc. See if the BS or BSN in shorter. I happen to think biology and chemistry are more related to anesthesia than the BSN stuff and you will have a basis for direct patient care from ADN. I say that assuming UTC accepts related BS degrees (not only BSN). I chose the BSN bridge because it meant getting to anesthesia school one year sooner. I actually love chemistry and wish I could have gotten BS in chemistry in the same amount of time...oh well.

    I suggest trying to find a tech postition in an ICU if the hospitals in your area utilize tech in their units. This gets you very familiar with patients and how to take care of them with all the monitors connected to them. You can get great exposure even as a tech in an ICU. Also it gets your foot in the door for an RN position in the unit.

    Just about done... another benefit of the shorter route that Kevin and I have agreed on before is the fact that every year longer in the process can means $100,000 or more. If you look at it that way, it motivates you a little more to get on with it.

    Hope this helps

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