Any civilian Fort Sam CRNA grads/student out there? - page 2

by TX RN

1,832 Visits | 18 Comments

My wife is really interested in doing this program. It's the only program in SA, TX and relocating to another city is not an option. She's settling for a NP program. I really would rather her not. I'm a NP myself, and while I... Read More


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    The civilian spot is for VA students. There are no nongovernment civilian spots at the Army program. http://www.northeastern.edu/bouve/nu...ingAnesthesia/
    http://www.medicalsurgical.va.gov/ME..._Education.asp
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    I am in Phase 1 now and, yes, there are civilians in the program-- VA students, as wtbcrna posted above. The "recent program student" was, perhaps, referring to a student sponsored by the VA.

    THIS IS HEARSAY RIGHT HERE: one could go get a job at a VA ICU, work there for the minimum time required, then apply for VA approval, apply for USAGPAN admission, and secure sponsorship from a VA hospital that wants you after you graduate, then come here for three years, graduate, and then work at your sponsoring VA for the duration of your contract term.
    wtbcrna likes this.
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    Thanks wtbcrna & chudder.My wife sent an email to the program director a week ago and she just heard back this morning.How's that for timing?! HahaLooks like there's a recruiter that will be contacting her.My wife has a strong GPA and a solid critical care background at a top pedi-ICU with multiple certifications. If this doesn't work out I'm going to keep pushing her to keep her options open.Moving is not an option we like but it maybe a necessity.We'll see.
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    Quote from TX RN
    Thanks wtbcrna & chudder.My wife sent an email to the program director a week ago and she just heard back this morning.How's that for timing?! HahaLooks like there's a recruiter that will be contacting her.My wife has a strong GPA and a solid critical care background at a top pedi-ICU with multiple certifications. If this doesn't work out I'm going to keep pushing her to keep her options open.Moving is not an option we like but it maybe a necessity.We'll see.
    You do realize that if she joined the Army and did this program that as soon as she finished the didactic portion of the program she would have to move for clinicals. Then you would probably be move 2-3 more times before her commitment was up.
    Last edit by wtbcrna on Jan 31, '13
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    I don't.We're still in the info gathering step. So we can make an informed decision once we understand what all is involved.Thanks.
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    Hi, I am already a CRNA with 5yr experience, interested in making a change and joining the military. Any advice, thoughts on which branch of service is best for a CRNA based on deployments, stations while not deployed, quality of life etc? Is the pay scale the same regardless of which branch of service you are in? Any thoughts on where I would enter in the officer ranking for each service?

    Thank you much for your thoughts and considerations, and experience!
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    Quote from smlpro
    Hi, I am already a CRNA with 5yr experience, interested in making a change and joining the military. Any advice, thoughts on which branch of service is best for a CRNA based on deployments, stations while not deployed, quality of life etc? Is the pay scale the same regardless of which branch of service you are in? Any thoughts on where I would enter in the officer ranking for each service?

    Thank you much for your thoughts and considerations, and experience!
    1. The Navy has the best bases, and is on par for quality of life with USAF.
    2. The Army will generally has the most and longest deployment times.
    3. The Army and the Navy has the best post graduate and PhD training opportunities.
    4. The USAF has the best scope of practice for CRNAs!!!
    5. Payscale is the same for all uniformed branches and so are the CRNA bonuses.
    6. You should be a Captain (O-3) starting out in the military, but each service has it's own rules on this and you would have to talk to a healthcare recruiter to find out exactly what rank you would qualify for.
    FYI: This just my opinion so take it with a grain of salt.

    No matter which service you pick it is important to know that you will be expected to be able to perform as independent practitioner. This can be a problem for some civilian CRNAs making the transition from civilian to military.
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    Thank you so much! I've been reading a bunch of the threads on this site and trying to gain a good understanding of enlistment and military life and practice. Your posts are very helpful and insightful so thank you. The hardest part as someone with no military experience is deciphering the differences between each service branch. Based off of my limited understanding and research the Navy and USAF are my considerations. I currently practice in WA state and have and have been moonlighting to gain some true independence and skills in my practice, so performing as an independent practitioner is a concern-I don't want to be cavalier-but I think I can manage well.

    If it's not too forward of me to ask, I am wondering what type of cases and practice setting you are currently in and what have you done while deployed? I.E. off sight (MRI, GI/Endo, CardioVersions etc), OB, General Surg, Cardiothoracic...? I currently practice in a hospital setting where we do everything but OB epidurals, and Cardiothoracic, heavy Gen Surg, & Ortho, GYN.

    Where have your deployments be to? And are you happy with your choice to remain in service?

    Once again, I really appreciate your candor with answering all the questions thrown at you!
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    Quote from smlpro
    Thank you so much! I've been reading a bunch of the threads on this site and trying to gain a good understanding of enlistment and military life and practice. Your posts are very helpful and insightful so thank you. The hardest part as someone with no military experience is deciphering the differences between each service branch. Based off of my limited understanding and research the Navy and USAF are my considerations. I currently practice in WA state and have and have been moonlighting to gain some true independence and skills in my practice, so performing as an independent practitioner is a concern-I don't want to be cavalier-but I think I can manage well.

    If it's not too forward of me to ask, I am wondering what type of cases and practice setting you are currently in and what have you done while deployed? I.E. off sight (MRI, GI/Endo, CardioVersions etc), OB, General Surg, Cardiothoracic...? I currently practice in a hospital setting where we do everything but OB epidurals, and Cardiothoracic, heavy Gen Surg, & Ortho, GYN.

    Where have your deployments be to? And are you happy with your choice to remain in service?

    Once again, I really appreciate your candor with answering all the questions thrown at you!
    I am at a smaller hospital. I do all the cases that the hospital does....general, OB/gyn, No CV here (most places in the military that do CV surgery are done by MDA residents/MDA staff), cardioversions, we are going to start doing VATs where I am at, lots ortho with US guided regional, etc.
    Deployments are mixed bag. Our department has gone anywhere from presidential missions, to Afghanistan, the Philippines, Honduras, Iraq, Eastern Europe, and Qatar. Deployments for the AF are usually every 18mo for 6mo tours. Tour lengths can be longer or shorter, but in general are 6 months at a time.
    It sounds like you have a good background. I would work on your US guided regional skills, if you don't do blocks very often.


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