University of Alabama Nursing

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    Hello good people!

    I want to apply to UA's Nursing program for the summer and want to get some info from other people who have applied and/or attends the program. I shied away from applying for this fall because of my gpa. I still don't have the greatest gpa which is a 3.2 for nursing foundation courses. I thought about taking some classes that I didn't do so well in to boost my gpa and then apply. Do any of you know someone who has been admitted to the nursing program at UA with a gpa around the same as mine?
  2. 5 Comments so far...

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    I know several people who attended UA. My advice, don't do it. There are several other programs in West and Central Alabama that will do a much better job of preparing you to be a nurse, and the other programs are much more student friendly. UA is all about the image - white, 18-22, female, and rich - not about actually preparing you for the hands on job of caring for patients.

    If you are deadset on having a degree with "University of Alabama" on it, get your ASN from somewhere like UWA, Shelton, or BCC and then complete the RN-BSN program online. This route is quicker to having your license and working earning the "Big Bucks."
    futurernjap likes this.
  4. 0
    oh man is it really that horrible? i've heard that about UA's program
  5. 0
    Yes it is that bad. A friend of mine went to school there for his basics; he needed an "override" to register for an anatomy class - just like every other nursing student, when he showed up with about a dozen of his female classmates, they all got an override form and he was told sorry. Another friend was told that being a single mom would make it "too difficult for her at UA and that she would be better suited for Shelton State Community College" - even though she had a 4.0 on ALL her prereqs.

    I have since graduated and now work at a facility that hires several new grads each semester, and the UA new grads are definitely NOT prepared. I had a new grad recently that claimed not to know how to give an IM shot!

    Don't just take my word for it; do some research and talk to a lot of people and I think you will see a pattern. Plus, if you go to a ADN Program it will only take 5 semesters to get your license as opposed to up to 8 semesters at UA. Think of how much money you could make in 3 semesters working as an RN while getting your BSN online? Good luck with whatever decision you make.
  6. 0
    The last post on here disturbes me for one main reason, and that is the idea of South not preparing students. I recently (6 months ago) graduated from their accelerated BSN program and I have to say that I feel I was very prepared for work.

    When I say very prepared, that is in the theoretical sense; South is very very good at this. I was not totally prepared in the clinical sense because let's face it, no one that I have ever seen (in 6 months) who is a new grad is prepared clinically. The best thing you can do is find a good area with helpful nurses and ask questions. By the way, I am working in a MICU if you were wondering which area.

    However, the last post was correct in saying that they do show preferences. They especially show preferences toward the demographics the poster said: upper-class white females. But even with this, I did not receive any grad I didn't deserve...I just happened to get all the patients who were very critical. I am very glad that this happened, as it helped me prepare for work though.

    Everyone has an opinion, and every school isn't perfect but I did enjoy South.
  7. 0
    Quote from 11SAnurse
    The last post on here disturbes me for one main reason, and that is the idea of South not preparing students. I recently (6 months ago) graduated from their accelerated BSN program and I have to say that I feel I was very prepared for work.

    When I say very prepared, that is in the theoretical sense; South is very very good at this. I was not totally prepared in the clinical sense because let's face it, no one that I have ever seen (in 6 months) who is a new grad is prepared clinically. The best thing you can do is find a good area with helpful nurses and ask questions. By the way, I am working in a MICU if you were wondering which area.

    However, the last post was correct in saying that they do show preferences. They especially show preferences toward the demographics the poster said: upper-class white females. But even with this, I did not receive any grad I didn't deserve...I just happened to get all the patients who were very critical. I am very glad that this happened, as it helped me prepare for work though.

    Everyone has an opinion, and every school isn't perfect but I did enjoy South.
    I didn't mean to disturb you, but I was referring to the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, not South Alabama.


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