Question about Interview

  1. I am interviewing for a RN position in the Neuro/Trauma ICU. Is there anything in particular that I might need to brush up on before I go into the interview. I'm graduating in May, and to solidify a position on this floor would be fantastic. :hatparty: There are two positions that will be open because of two people transferring out of the unit. Are there any suggestions to better my chances of getting hired?

    Thanks
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  2. 3 Comments

  3. by   versatile_kat
    Dustin ... I work in a CTICU, but my first interview out of college was for an SICU, and they offered me the job before I left the building. I think one major factor in impressing your potential employers is self-effacing confidence. I know it sounds like an oxymoron but it's true. Make your weaknesses positive [i.e., you have a soft spot for children and would not want to work with ped's patient's (I'm assuming this is an adult ICU you're applying for), and the fact that you're a new grad is a weakness, but that will be improved upon once you start working and learning].

    Did you do any clinical's with an ICU during school? Let them know about it and how much you enjoyed it. Another sure winner is letting them know you're there for the long run. If you have plans on moving in the next 2 years, don't let them know about it!!! It costs the hospital A LOT of money to train you in critical care classes, and then orient you to the unit for 4 to 6 weeks ... they're going to want to make sure that you're a good investment.

    Most of all, remain relaxed during the interview. You'll be working in an ICU where the pressure is on almost all the time. If you're nervous and fidgeting during the interview, they may take that into consideration on whether or not you'll be able to handle the stress in certain situations (codes, patient bleeding, etc.). Good luck and let us know how it goes!!!
  4. by   DustinRN
    Quote from versatile_kat
    Dustin ... I work in a CTICU, but my first interview out of college was for an SICU, and they offered me the job before I left the building. I think one major factor in impressing your potential employers is self-effacing confidence. I know it sounds like an oxymoron but it's true. Make your weaknesses positive [i.e., you have a soft spot for children and would not want to work with ped's patient's (I'm assuming this is an adult ICU you're applying for), and the fact that you're a new grad is a weakness, but that will be improved upon once you start working and learning].

    Did you do any clinical's with an ICU during school? Let them know about it and how much you enjoyed it. Another sure winner is letting them know you're there for the long run. If you have plans on moving in the next 2 years, don't let them know about it!!! It costs the hospital A LOT of money to train you in critical care classes, and then orient you to the unit for 4 to 6 weeks ... they're going to want to make sure that you're a good investment.

    Most of all, remain relaxed during the interview. You'll be working in an ICU where the pressure is on almost all the time. If you're nervous and fidgeting during the interview, they may take that into consideration on whether or not you'll be able to handle the stress in certain situations (codes, patient bleeding, etc.). Good luck and let us know how it goes!!!



    Thanks for the information. So, should I tell them that I plan on applying for CRNA school in 2-3yrs? Probably not.
  5. by   versatile_kat
    I responded to your PM, but in answer to your current question, no, I would not let them know you are planning on applying for CRNA school. My current job knew from the get go that I was applying for CRNA school, but hired me anyways because I had a great deal of CVICU experience. You, on the other hand, are just graduating. Keep that little pearl to yourself until the time is right (i.e., don't bring your GRE study books with you to work).

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