Question for the ADN students here!

  1. Hey all! I hope your finals are going well. I have two left!!!

    Anyways, i was wondering. Many of the students in ADN programs have said something about "levels" in their posts.

    Like, starting level one, finishing up level two-level 4, etc.

    What do you mean? Are levels split into quarters with two levels a semester? Just curious, as I had never heard anyone refer to their programs by "level" before.

    Thanks!!
    BrandyBSN
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  2. 4 Comments

  3. by   MRed94
    Brandy,

    I think that is the UK students talking, I know most of their schooling is at levels instead of grades. I might be wrong, tho....

    Marla
  4. by   Nixon
    Brandy,

    I'm not an ADN student, but I am a BSN student in Colorado. At my school we refer to semesters as levels. A level one student is in his/her first semester of the program, a level 3 would be in their third semester of a five semester program. I just finished my first semester with all A's. Next semester I'll be a level two student, one down four more to go. Hope this helps.

    Brad
  5. by   BrandyBSN
    Marla, now that I thought about it, i think they were from the UK Its interesting to learn how different programs use different words for things

    Brad, thanks for the info!

    Now i can put my curiousity to rest

    BrandyBSN
  6. by   StudentSandra
    in my program, level 1 is first year nursing students. that would be the first and second smester of the adn program. second level is second year in the nursing program, semesters 3 & 4.

    the level doesn't pertain to how long you have been in college, just the adn program. we only start nursing classes in the fall, so we only graduate nursing students in the spring.

    the summer between the first and second level, you can take an lpn exit course, take your boards and stop. or continue on, working as an lpn during the second year of school.

    current lpn's can take a summer course, (i forget the name) and join up with the second level students.

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