Best Career Path to Take?

  1. 0
    Hello,

    I'm a university graduate from Chicago holding a non-nursing BS degree, but I have all the pre-req's completed to be able to jump into, say, an ABSN program.

    My ultimate goal is to become an NP (preferable Family or something related to the ER). However I also want to reach this goal ASAP, or at least be able to support myself and a family ASAP. Which of the following options would allow this the best?

    ---Option 1) UIC's GEP program which is basically: 15 months of BSN curriculum, then sitting for NCLEX, and then going straight into an NP program (2-4 years depending on full/part time) - this would take me from roughly Jan 2014 to Fall 2017-2019
    Something to consider here: It's definitely possible for me to be doing the MSN portion part time and then working to support myself as well

    ---Option 2) Loyola ABSN program to become an RN w/ BSN by Mid 2014 then go onto an NP program, roughly 2-4 years.
    Something to consider, however, is that many if not all MSN/NP programs require at least a year of work experience as an RN, so that could delay the date in which I become an NP,
    but gives me time to work full time and save up (with family support)

    Considering my goals above, and the various considerations given with each option, which do you think is best for the long run, and also getting on my own two feet as quickly as possible?
  2. Poll: Which option is best? (please read below)

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  4. 6 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    The one year required experience is really important. Honestly I'd say to do whichever is best for you, you may want to go fast but can you actually handle that? Do you have a family or want to start one? Either option will most likely require one year of experience at the minimum. Think about it. Do you want a NP fresh out of school with absolutely no experience outside of clinicals? I know you want to start working in your dream job today, but taking it slower may be a better bet so you'll be a better NP. Just my two cents
  6. 0
    I voted for option one for the efficiency -- and my guess that it will probably be cheaper. (Money is an important consideration, but you didn't give that information.) However, I STRONGLY encourage you to get some clinical experience before getting too deep into the NP part of your program -- either by taking a little break and focusing on work (and that key transition from student to practicing nurse) -- or by going to NP school VERY part time at first.

    Also ... I would recommend option 2 if the schools in your area are going to be switching their NP programs to DNP programs any time soon. Find out what their plans are. BS to BSN to DNP might be a whole lot quicker and cheaper than BS to MSN to DNP.
  7. 0
    Many programs want a certain number of work hours as an RN before you graduate as an NP. Some want a certain amount of time or hours before you start the program. It's an important difference. With the first option you can work will doing NP courses and get your required hours.
  8. 0
    Quote from misssammyrae
    Think about it. Do you want a NP fresh out of school with absolutely no experience outside of clinicals? I know you want to start working in your dream job today, but taking it slower may be a better bet so you'll be a better NP. Just my two cents
    Quote from llg
    However, I STRONGLY encourage you to get some clinical experience before getting too deep into the NP part of your program -- either by taking a little break and focusing on work (and that key transition from student to practicing nurse) -- or by going to NP school VERY part time at first.
    I definitely agree, and what I think I forgot to mention was that I more than likely will be working as an RN and do the MSN portion part time (I think pretty much with either option, to finance the degree at the least). However UIC's direct-MSN program (1st option) has no requirement for work hours before getting the MSN as tigerlogic mentioned, since they allow you to go full-time through the MSN program after doing the NCLEX.

    Quote from llg
    Also ... I would recommend option 2 if the schools in your area are going to be switching their NP programs to DNP programs any time soon. Find out what their plans are. BS to BSN to DNP might be a whole lot quicker and cheaper than BS to MSN to DNP.
    That actually is another option, I am aware that UIC also has a program for BSN/RN to DNP, so doing Loyola's ABSN (until mid 2014) then getting into that direct-DNP program. What key advantages does a DNP give me over simply being a master's level NP?


    Thank you all very much for your help
  9. 0
    As more and more NP's get DNP's, it is likely that in time, the DNP will be the preferred degree -- and it may become required for some jobs. Right now, the DNP is only a recommendation of certain factions within nursing -- but the historical trend is for upgrading education. If I were interested in becoming an NP in the 21st century, I would be planning to get a DNP and be one of the people with the higher degree -- not one of the people with the minimal qualifications.
  10. 0
    So it seems like the best thing to do is think about getting a DNP as it's the wisest choice for the long run. Due to that, let me update the choices a bit:

    1) Like option 2 above, go to Loyola's ABSN program until mid/late 2014 to have BSN-RN, then (I'm assuming) work a bit, then go into UIC's DNP for BSN holders program (and most likely work during that).

    2) DePaul's program which would turn me, a non-nursing BS holder, into an MSN-holding RN by mid 2015, then since I have an MSN I'll be able to go into any DNP program regularly.

    Which is better/faster? What are the key pros/cons of each?

    Thanks again


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