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Bhavana

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Bhavana's Latest Activity

  1. A family member has to do a wee bit more than be difficult to be banned from a facility. If we banned all the annoying family members, our patients would have no visitors at all. Myself, I just ignore them when they start acting up. I pretend they just don't exist. But for the average pain in the butt relative? Not much you can do. I try to think about what is really going on with them - they are dealing with one of life's greatest stresses. We need to have some compassion in this case. Then you have people who want to complain, and will never be happy, no matter what you do for them (these are the ones I deal with by ignoring - which works well, because they eventually walk away and find someone more responsive to annoy) Truth is, dealing with the families is part of the job. No one knows as well as me that even the most well meaning of them can suck up all your time and energy, but what can you do?? Just smile, grit your teeth, and keep on going.
  2. Bhavana

    Will it ever feel better???

    First of all, as a per diem nurse, the next shift's nurse is not going to expect you to know every little thing about every patient, since you probably do not work with them regularly. Just know their basic medical history, their most important issues, such as why they are there, and what happened during your shift, that's all. If the on-coming nurse asks something you can't answer, grab the chart and the two of you can look it up together. What are these things that you are forgetting? As long as all the patients were assessed, got their meds and proper treatments, and you didn't kill anyone, then I don't think you should be too stressed. Where I work, they are big on signing out meds - so I don't forget to do that. It's the old saying "If it wasn't signed, it wasn't done". Make a list of the things that are important not to forget at your job, and go over it before you leave every night. And don't be so hard on yourself if you do forget something. You are a human, not a robot, and we are not all perfect. If it is something really important, call when you get home and tell the nurse that took over your patients that you didn't do it and ask her to. I have done this, just did it 2 nights ago, and it is usually not a big deal. We all have bad nights. There are nights when I want to go in the bathroom and cry every 10 minutes. Nights when I cry on the way home. Nursing can be stressful. But it doesn't mean you are doing a bad job. I am grateful to work one floor, with the same patients every night. At least I know them, and know what to expect, and that makes my job somewhat easier. Just do the best you can and hang in there. Certain things DO get easier as your confidence builds - and this can take a lot of time in nursing.
  3. Bhavana

    RN's forced to do CNA work

    No one said you are not allowed to have an opinion, but like many of the CNA's that have responded to this post, you seem to be taking it personally when someone says that they wouldn't want to do cna work. I think your feelings are coloring your judgement. I know a lot of great nurses who never worked as CNA's. It is not a prerequisite for nursing. And all of this is strongly dependent on the type of nursing you choose - a hospital or rehab nurse with 5 or 6 patients may have more time to pitch in with patient care than a LTC nurse, some of whom might have up to 30 (25 of them incontinent) patients to medicate and do treatments on every shift. With the average 2 med passes, that puts you at approximately 60 times you are medicating - and with the elderly, you don't just give them a few pills to swallow and that's it. Pills have to be crushed, BP's have to be checked, there are peg tubes and there are neb treatments, there are blood sugars to be checked and insulin to give...and don't forget, some patients with dementia can be combative when you try to get them to do things. So you have to be pretty creative to get them to participate sometimes. Your attitude and willingness to do it all are commendable, but may not be realistic in a good deal of nursing situations. I am sure you will be a great nurse, though. Good luck with school, it's awesome that where you work now is paying for it, I have never heard of that for a CNA. In fact, seems that even paying for furthering education for RN's is becoming a thing of the past. Where I work used to do it, but not anymore. With all the cuts recently, this has become one of the first things to go, and I live in an area where there are a lot of people, and a lot of new nurses because we have so many nursing schools. Competition for jobs is brutal. Guess all the hospitals and nursing homes could go broke trying to get us all our BSN and Master's degrees. Anyway, I do wish you well. Not my intention to argue, just to show a different view.
  4. oh do I feel your pain. My way of handling it was to completely ignore the annoying, negative, downright rude family members. I didnt waste time arguing, or justifying myself or my aides, i just pretended they were not there, that they did not exist. Since I was usually in front of my med cart, they'd come sauntering up, and start with their BS, and I'd just keep doing what I was doing like they were not even there. NO eye contact, and don't acknowledge them at all. And the beauty of it was, considering they were rude and demanding to everyone who listened, anyone in management would run in the other direction when they see them, so they really couldn't even find anyone to listen to them if they wanted to complain that I was ignoring them.
  5. Bhavana

    Some tips that might help

    Appearances mean so much. Be dressed properly, be clean and well pressed. Look the part. You will be representing this place - think about how you would want people representing YOUR business to look. most important, be yourself! be friendly, be outgoing. be nice, be interested in the job, the company. many places hire people they like and figure that your personality is something you bring to the job - they can train you to do the work, but they can't train you to be a great person, a great asset to the company.
  6. Bhavana

    RN's forced to do CNA work

    working as a cna and observing nurses is not the same as being one. Respectfully, it is always the ones who have no idea who think they know the most. where you live and work also has a lot to do with your duties. where I work, and in most large cities, rns do not do patient care on the same level cnas do. you seem to be stuck on changing diapers and schlepping bed pans as all a part of "nursing", and while that may technically be so, it is not practical for an rn to stop what she is doing and run to empty a bed pan every time a bell goes off. the more interruptions a nurse has, the more likely it is that she will make a mistake. This is a proven fact. I only hear honesty in the op's attitude. Just because he or she does not want to do the dirty part of patient care does not make he or she any less entitled to be a nurse. You have no nursing experience, but feel the right to judge someone on their career choice because they don't see it the way you do? nursing is a varied field with endless options. we are not all robots who leave nursing school thinking the same way and wanting to do the same things. And the op is 100% spot on about time constraints. nurses do not sit around all night reading avon books and waiting for call bells to go off. often they have more duties than they have time for, this is the way it is in most nursing jobs. not sure where you will work, but what sums it up is too many patients per nurse and very little time for comforting and plumping pillows, its all run run run, and run some more. you are likely to have a change in attitude when your responsibilities increase, a day will come when the 5th call bell for toileting goes off and there are no aides around to get it. having to stop what you are doing to take care of "cna work" every half hour adds up to a lot of time at the end of the night that you will have to stay past your clock out time to try to finish up your work. time you are not likely to be paid for. you are entitled to your opinion, but there is a huge difference between the two jobs. while the line between the two may occasionally blur, there is a reason why one requires a college education and one does not. There is a reason why one pays well and the other generally does not. while a nurse may occasionally have to help out with patient care, it is her job to delegate most of it, and this is in black and white on the job descriptions for RN's at places that employ both CNAs and RNs. Being humble and not coming off like you know everything there is to know about nursing, and other nurses and their motives, will help you immensely once you get out of school. Just an FYI to keep an open mind and realize that not everyone, including some great nurses, sees things as you do. Best of luck.
  7. Bhavana

    NJ Disorderly Persons Charge

    I know someone who did the same thing - answered NO on the application, then something turned up in her background. I suppose she had to reapply, explain why she answered NO the way she did - she didn't think it would show up. Instead of being about to take the NCLEX in July after graduating, she had to wait till October. Can't you reapply, explain what happened? Things should work out...oh, and by the way, the same person I mentioned didn't even find a job till the following summer. So I wouldn't stress too much about this, lots of nurses in NJ are having trouble finding work now anyway - maybe things will be better on the job market by the time you get all this worked out.
  8. Bhavana

    NJ Disorderly Persons Charge

    The schools don't really care about the student's criminal background - it's the clinical location facilities that require these checks- i.e. the hospitals, nursing homes, wherever clinicals are done. And yes, you are right, the board will probably, if your daughter writes them about her background and how things have changed etc etc - there would most likely be no problem with her getting a license. Have you tried different schools? Have you talked to a lawyer? There are lawyers that specifically deal with nurses and legal situations that apply to nurses.
  9. Bhavana

    NJ Disorderly Persons Charge

    wow, that's a little judgmental on your part, wouldn't you say? I wasn't aware that all nurses must be beyond reproach, perfect angels, above the rest of the human race. You are very naive if you think they are.
  10. Bhavana

    Am I too old to just be starting?

    The opinion of a lot of nurses of all ages is that the younger nurses tend to be less reliable and call out more. They also are not as committed, and jump from job to job more so than more mature nurses. I am sure that those hiring take this into account as well.
  11. maybe no direct careplan questions, but COUNTLESS questions on the steps of the nursing process, which is what careplans are based on.
  12. Care plans are a pain in the butt, but they do serve a purpose - to get you thinking about diagnosis and to drum the NURSING PROCESS into your head. The nursing process is what it is all about, and we have to know it, understand it. Once you actually start working, care plans will be standardized and can be pulled up in the computer - and most of the stuff will just become instinctual. To think of the HOURS I spent working on care plans when the average nurse completes them in 20 seconds! But, those hours were not wasted, I learned a lot.
  13. Bhavana

    Advise for upcoming clinical

    I wish my school had required the iPod - heck of a lot more convenient than lugging around the Davis Drug book! We needed the steth, scissors, watch, penlight, bandage tape, black ink pens, and small forceps WITH teeth. Always be sure to carry xtra batteries for your penlight, or an extra penlight. Mine was always dead, probably because I left it on too many times. Something else I found convenient for clinical was a small notebook, small enough to fit in the average scrub pocket, the best are those index card notebooks. Better than having to carry a clipboard around, or loose pieces of paper. I was always forgetting that stuff, leaving it behind in patient rooms, etc. Other things you may need to carry in your bigger bag - bottled water, snacks, a good med/surg book for looking things up if necessary when working on care plans (Lippencotts Straight A's in Med-Surg Nursing is a good, and smallish book) and also those little pocket nursing books, they have them for every subject, at least get one on meds. Also keep paper, and extra copies of care plans or anything else required. For us females, a good sized makeup bag with all those necessary feminine things - including deodorant, hand lotion, etc, I bought a lot of those little sample sizes at the drug store. If your scrubs are dark colored like ours were, carry a lint brush.
  14. Bhavana

    Advise for upcoming clinical

    Listen and learn. Unless you know everything, speak only when spoken to or asked a question. Acting like a know it all is clinical suicide, they will go out of their way to make sure you know that you DO NOT know it all. Be humble and show respect to the instructor. Keep a low profile. Show up on time, uniform clean and pressed. If you are wearing white, and it starts to look yellowish, go out and splurge on some new scrubs, they are cheap and how you look DOES matter to many instructors. Be prepared for whatever it is that you will be doing that day - read any associated chapters, have any assignments done and ready to turn in, have your stethoscope, penlight, etc. at hand and ready to use. Be organized. Be ready for anything!! Most of all, be positive and cheerful and eager to learn. You'll do great! Good luck!
  15. Bhavana

    Is this academic dishonesty?

    I doubt it. I also think it is a good idea to get a head start, especially with the fundamentals. Buy a used textbook, best to get one that your future school uses. Get familiar with the basics. Wouldn't hurt to find out what the math/dosage/calculation requirements are and learn about those, or become familiar with medical terminology. Don't get too carried away, because you don't know exactly what your school will require when you start. Sometimes too much too soon can be confusing.
  16. Bhavana

    Am I too old to just be starting?

    Are you for real??? 26 and you are wondering if you are too old? Do some research. At least half the students in my school were over 35, some were over 50, and I would bet that this is the norm. Nursing is very popular as a second career.
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