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tatara

tatara

psychiatric nursing, med/surg adult care
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tatara specializes in psychiatric nursing, med/surg adult care.

tatara's Latest Activity

  1. Have you ever came across those old censored/pornographic videos and posters with main characters dressed or identified as nurses? During the 70's, media greatly influenced the society to view the image of nurses as less respectable and undesirable work force. Good thing it is now a thing in the past. People now have high regards to nurses, thanks to the constantly evolving nursing education. Wait, do people really look up at nurses? When I think of what they say that history repeats itself, I wonder how could it be to the nursing profession. Is there really a u-turn in this very far-advanced and far developed science? Is media still as powerful as it was before to kick dirt and stain the nobility and dignity of our profession? Or the responsibility is actually just in the midst of us who sometimes forget about the ideals of nursing and its values that are expected of us to emulate?
  2. tatara

    Gross Question....

    I often get to care for burn patients who can't afford regular debridement. I tell you, the smell haunts me even at sleep! I would spray cologne to a sheet of 4x8 gauze, line it inside my N95, and wear protective (sterile) gear with cap. My nose gets immune with the smell within 5 minutes of exposure. It doesn't bother me much now that I'm so used to those different horrible smells in my area; body odor, smelly feet, colostomy bag content, halitosis, hematochezia/melena, smegma... I can go on and on I'm gross.
  3. tatara

    Update on Sally

    Yes. Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever. It kills many children (even adults) here in the Philippines. Cases peak during rainy/wet season when mosquitoes breed easily. In some cases, fever is the only presenting symptom and while febrile, plt ct is within normal limit which masks the cause. Mortality usually happen when fever subsides and as patients are expected to get back on their feet, go to school and play, platelet count plummet resulting to hemorrhage. Many patients are rushed in the ER already too late for a promising prognosis. Sadly, misdiagnosis is another problem.
  4. tatara

    Being a Nurse for a Killer

    I think of lawyers who have to stand by the side of self-confessed criminals to defend them and their human rights. Nurses care, they don't judge.
  5. tatara

    Update on Sally

    She passed away last night. Sally, that sweet little child with dingy Barney developed massive UGIB. Her platelet count dropped from 51 to 22 in just a matter of 6 hours. She was trasferred to PICU, coded twice and died 9 hours after transfer. The mother blames those staff who took over because they got rid of barney while Sally was already unresponsive after the 1st code. They placed the toy in the patient's belongings box. She was even waiving goodbye at us on her ride down to the intensive care unit. Last time I saw her, she was smiling although irritated with the discomfort of her nasogastric tube. Why do angels on earth have to go to heaven too soon? Pardon me, I just feel compelled to post this one in memory of her. The joys and pains of nursing. This aspect of my job is what I hate most, dealing with myself every after a patient dies. Surely, I will get by. Sigh, what other profession gets one to grieve more often than by being a nurse?
  6. tatara

    Dingy Barney

    She passed away last night. Sally*, that sweet little child with dingy Barney developed massive UGIB. Her platelet count dropped from 51 to 22 in just a matter of 6 hours. She was trasferred to PICU, coded twice and died 9 hours after transfer. The mother blames those staff who took over because they got rid of barney while Sally was already unresponsive after the 1st code. They placed the toy in the patient's belongings box. She was even waiving goodbye at us on her ride down to the intensive care unit. Last time I saw her, she was smiling although irritated with the discomfort of her nasogastric tube. Why do angels on earth have to go to heaven too soon? Pardon me, I just feel compelled to post this one in memory of her. The joys and pains of nursing. This aspect of my job is what I hate most, dealing with myself every after a patient dies. Surely, I will get by. Sigh, what other profession gets one to grieve more often than by being a nurse? Thank you guys for commenting. I am learning a lot from your posts. :redbeathetatara * Name changed to protect patient privacy.
  7. tatara

    Dingy Barney

    I remember she was in good mood last night when I told her: " I see that you really love Barney, huh?" she suddenly she threw me a fierce look, with eyes blazing haha! My only concern is that Barney harbors godzillions of germs and microorganisms that can harm the patient with already compromised health condition. But I agree that it would be wicked of anyone to take away that only thing she best draws comfort from.
  8. Urine C&S sample from wet pads? No way. Your effort will be useless. That idea from a supervisor? Are you sure she knows what she's talking about or did she read and understand the order?:loveya: Extreme nursing ingenuity is needed. Very challenging. In our facility we use condom cath, but still, not a sterile means of obtaining specimen. I would encourage patient to drink plenty of fluids if allowed, wrap feet with wet towel or dip the pinky in cold water and then instruct the watcher to "watch out" for the patient to pee and catch specimen mid stream. It usually works when the watcher is as determined as the nurse.
  9. tatara

    Dingy Barney

    Attachment to inanimate object, say a toy, is cute and acceptable to a certain degree especially among hospitalized children who are in a great deal of stress. Cuddling a teddy bear is comforting and soothing, but when do parents need to consult a psychologist or a counselor for their child who just couldn't let anybody take away her precious rag doll? I have a patient, 5 year-old Sally*, who came in with Dengue H fever. The case is on its critical stage (6 units of platelet concentrate is ordered to be transfused ASAP) with all the classic symptoms on surface, and I understand how difficult it must be for the mom to see her child go through all those agonizing blood extractions. And then I noticed Barney, sooooo dirty and dingy (yikes! can't imagine the smell) also tucked in the sheets with the patient. Sally has that Barney since age 1, which according to the mother, her daughter couldn't sleep without it and it goes with her practically anywhere, in the school, church, birthday parties, park, etc. The child does not allow even her mom to take the stuffed toy for laundry and the family used all means to bargain but to no avail. She would throw tantrums and one time when her father forced her to let go of the toy she got sick and didn't eat. They just gave up. I learned later on with the phlebotomist that each and every blood extractions, he has to "draw blood" from barney first so that Sally would cooperate. Yes seemingly harmless, but totally abnormal behavior. She's a sweet little child, angelic even. But when asked about Barney, she just said defensively not to mind her and leave Barney alone. If you are the parent, what would you do? Being the nurse, to what extent can you offer help with parenting concerns like this? Nursing is a patient per patient challenge. :doh: * Nmae changed to protect patient privacy.
  10. tatara

    I Made It

    Don't mention it. just come again.
  11. tatara

    I Made It

    Seek yourself. For a while, get out of the picture and look at things in a different perspective. -Try to identify what motivates you, or think how you get inspired in accomplishing even the little things you do everyday. -Love what you do. Put your 100% into it. -Reward yourself -Laugh, smile a lot -Picture yourself as how you always wanted to be, choose a role model (an admirable, successful nurse whom you can get to talk and be inspired with) -Count your blessings -Appreciate little things that tend to get unnoticed like how a sincere thank you from a patient makes you feel inside -Have positive and happy thoughts every after shift as you head home -Write down or have a journal of those that you did during the day which you are unhappy about or which you could have done better given another chance -Do not succumb into failure, instead, remind yourself that before they became somebody, they too started as nobody -Pray I know they are easily said than done, but just try. After all, it is always possible to have fun and enjoy clinicals as you experience the peculiar ways into which you learn. I hope you can chase your dreams and make them a reality. God bless you.
  12. tatara

    I Made It

    I got so self-conscious while growing up because my perfect smile was replaced by large, corn kernel-looking discolored teeth! Ah, I thought, I had to do something to reverse whatever curse was cast upon my teeth. I dreamed of becoming a dentist. After many years, still holding on to my dream of earning a degree in dentistry, I motivated myself to survive high school so I can go to the city for college. Little did I know at that time, that my plan was very different from the one that I was made to fulfill. That summer after high school graduation, when my 80-year old grandma arrived from abroad (where she lived for over 15 years with my aunt), was the turning point. She was frail and obviously need a great deal of nursing care. She had a number of diseases along with different complications like hypertension, dysarthria (related to a previous stroke), and obstructive sleep apnea. My mom, being the youngest among her siblings, was tasked to care for her. I saw how challenging her responsibilities were and I admired how graceful and systematic she performed each and every bed bath and diaper change knowing that she didn't even have any caregiving training at all! All was purely done as to how she has done it to us when we were little. With my gestures of trying to offer help, mom would say, "grandma needs you to hold her on the other side of the bed so she won't fall, and you are to share her happy memories of how you've been while she's away" thus, was my role: to keep grandma safe, happy, and alert. Never did I notice that as I admire my mom do her morning routines with grandma, I was being inspired to be like her when it will be my turn to take care of her in the future. Suddenly, I seemed to have forgotten how yellow my teeth are and how such a flaw made me feel about myself; I seemed to no longer care if my sister is prettier; nor even if I could still I dream of flashing a perfect white smile to the cutest guy in a campus. I just knew right then that no matter how I look, I got to be the best nurse my mom, grandma, and my family would ever have in their whole lives. (I even have had a silly thought that if I'm going to wear a white nurse's uniform, perhaps my face would glow under the light, and so my teeth would be whiter in the mirror). Come 1997, with the help of my supportive parents and very proud grandma, I took the road less taken (during the time when employment rate in the Philippines among qualified nurses was at the abyss). How could I be in this course? Why did I enjoy attending the nursing101 class of miss t (for terrorist)? Perhaps, I thought, I was really born to become a nurse, it was just because I got so overwhelmed with frustrations about my imperfections and that I was so selfish not to notice life's clues. After deciding that I wanted to pursue nursing, I realized I was on the right path. My determination to love and finish nursing education peaked when I got to experience my first normal spontaneous delivery assist. I knew as soon as I hand-over that newborn to his teary-eyed father by the door that this is my calling. As I pursued nursing, I discovered that all the learning in fundamentals would only have meaning as they are applied in practice. As I became a registered nurse, I discovered that those learning are meaningless if the heart is empty and if it is only the brain that dictates what I should do. As I became a staff nurse in an adult care section of a tertiary hospital, I discovered that every learning experience is a speck of sand that gets into an oyster that will soon become a lustrous sphere of pearl. Every encounter with different clients and their families are grains of sand, and will just remain as such if I won't be able to pick something good and worthwhile out of every encounter while doing what is expected of me. Now, as I struggle through post-graduate study, I discovered that the great personalities behind the profession of nursing still speak of what they taught to our foremothers long before I become a nurse. They are not meant to be silenced under piles of nursing textbooks in college. As I use the nursing process, as I preserve the dignity of my profession, as I accept my limitations as a nurse while honoring the expertise of other allied health professionals, as I respect the dignity of my patients, as the thirst for education lingers in me, and as nursing becomes part of who I am, I believe I am doing my best to live by the teachings of these great theorists to whom I owe my pride as a nurse from. And even should mold and termites consume all the pages of their works in those books, their legacy lives on in each and every nurse who considers nursing as a selfless giving of oneself, a vocation. Grandma died a year before I finished college, but I was able to apply what I learned from school and be of significant help to my mother especially in taking turns during weekends when grandma was slowly slipping from life to death. She died peacefully and without decubitus ulcers. While I was preparing for hospital duty, already in my white clinical uniform, mom looked on in the mirror and said to me that she was no longer afraid to grow old and get weak because she has a daughter who will later be in-charge for her and dad. I got even more inspired to go on. And as for my teeth, well, they remained discolored but I was able to take care of them that for over 20 years, I still have a complete set of teeth. I do not mind grinning with these yellow teeth for if I should have been a dentist, I wouldn't have realized how wonderful it is to become a nurse and I wouldn't be this privileged of touching and making a difference in the lives of my clients. Besides, in no time I can afford to have my teeth bleached (with state-of-the-art technology), it will just really take some time. I know my worth as a person, as a nurse, isn't in my smile but in the smiles of my ailing patients who are pleased that I have become a blessing for them. This has been my personal journey and how I made it through. This is my calling.
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