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FNP2019

FNP2019

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  1. FNP2019

    Georgetown/Simmons????

    Hi Future Provider, I totally get what you're saying. I think that recent grad vs not-so-recent grads have very different experiences MSN programs (regardless of the school). Having graduated 10 years ago with my BSN, I can say... yep- the material is pretty much new to me! Though I have used it extensively in practical application, it is an altogether different thing to be tested on it. And I see many of my extremely talented and experienced classmates facing the same dilemma. So don't be hard on yourself if you find yourself (now a few years out of school, I assume?) having a harder time than some of your classmates who went back sooner. To both you and the OP, best of luck in figuring out which program you want to do. Truth is, it is 100% dependent on your own work ethic. Bust your butt in school and you'll be fine when you graduate.
  2. Even if the two are the same cost, the question is: what job do you want to do? If you want to try out nursing, the ASBN is a terrific option. It'll give you the chance to really learn about being a nurse. You can also make good money as a nurse- often comparable (or more) than an NP- because you get hourly wages with shift differentials, overtime, etc vs salary. I am a strong believer that one should get nursing experience before becoming an NP- after working with direct-entry NPs, I gotta tell you, their lack of experience in nursing shows in an awkward way (making them difficult to work with), even if they are technically good at medication management and some of the other "advanced provider" tasks. Good luck!
  3. Rock your look whatever you go with, but certainly don't straighten it unless you want to! Certain jobs may require that you pull your hair back (or you might just realize that it is better to keep your hair away from patients who will tug at it if it is in reach- like kiddos!). Just practice styles that can work on a daily basis that aren't too much work, but still look neat, and you are good to go.
  4. FNP2019

    Georgetown/Simmons????

    Seriously? Classes at Georgetown EASY? I have to question whether your friend really did the GU program (I have heard people say GW was easy- and people almost always mix those two up). Also, Georgetown has a strict policy of not placing students with the same preceptor (I've only heard of it done by student request, but who knows, maybe it happened once or twice). I am in the FNP program right now and it is the absolutely most rigorous program I have ever done! (I daresay I am no dummy- I'm actually very good at school, with two bachelors degrees and a Masters from a top-tier Southern Ivy). To OP- Georgetown has been excellent. I'm finishing up my second semester. Professors are overall quite good- very knowledgeable in their topic. On campus intensive was EXCELLENT. My only gripe would be clinical placement- it is especially hard in cities... but that is pretty much true everywhere, even Brick and Mortar programs. Best bet is to go wherever you want (Georgetown, Simmons, probably doesn't matter) and network like crazy to secure connections at different sites. Advantage to that is you miss out on the crappy placements because you can vet the sites ahead of time for providers you like, distance from home, places you want to work, etc.
  5. Hi Meredith, I come from a similar background as you (MPH international health and development) and spent the last 8 years working in global health programs in DC before going back to school for my FNP and a complete career re-route. Please do careful research into jobs available once you're done. I have and there are VERY few opportunities, as advanced practice nursing is not recognized internationally. If you've got colleagues at the CDC, start connecting with them to find out if they accept nurse practitioners. You might find yourself up against MDs, who ARE internationally recognized, and passed over. You can certainly go the project management route, but keep in mind 1) your clinical skills may not get used AT ALL. (this is what drove me from the field and you'll be frustrated as you see your fellow clinicians, especially international colleagues, go from being valuable members of the healthcare system to managers pushing paperwork); 2) you certainly don't need a clinical degree (and the $80,000+ in debt you'll go into for it); and 3) funding is drying up in international development at an astonishing rate. Especially for HQ-based staff, as they are moving most operations out to the field where qualified locals can (and should!) be doing the jobs that used to be done by us expats. My recommendation: Network, network, network. Find the people who have jobs you want and talk to them. Find out who else is doing them. TL;DR: What specialty do I recommend? Probably NONE of them. Best of luck!
  6. FNP2019

    ASN or BSN for NGO work? Location: MA

    Sounds like a great plan! If you've got the languages, you are halfway there! :-) In the meantime, I encourage you to look into options that might expose you to health in the community- maybe working as an HIV counselor or as a translator in a clinic. Feeling comfortable with the medical environment and lingo will be a definite boost when you start school.
  7. FNP2019

    ASN or BSN for NGO work? Location: MA

    If you're really committed to the NGO route, I'd recommend going for a BSN, especially since MSF requires mgmt experience. It's great that you already have some developing country experience! I'd also keep in mind that they have a pretty strong preference for language skills, so it'd be good to start learning French too. (I've been working in international health for the last 6 years, and its the only way I've been able to get a job!) You can find MSF's qualifications here- General Requirements | MSF USA I'd also recommend checking out other organizations doing similar work- off the top of my head: Mercy Ships, International Medical Corps, and Project Hope all do great work. Best of luck!
  8. FNP2019

    What languages do you speak?

    Spanish and French here. Just trying to figure out what to do with them in Vermont!
  9. FNP2019

    Georgetown FNP program Fall 2017

    Hi pams155, thank you! Don't fret too much about the wait- mine took at FULL 6 WEEKS (the longest 6 weeks ever). I did the interview back in December and submitted my full application on New Year's Eve... it took 3 weeks for them to get through some "technical difficulties" in attaching my interview to the application, and another 3 weeks for the decision.
  10. FNP2019

    Georgetown FNP program Fall 2017

    You can join as long as you have your GU email address! You should be able to just search for it and request to be added!
  11. FNP2019

    Georgetown FNP program Fall 2017

    I just got accepted! I joined the facebook group for the GU MSN students already. Feel free to say hello!
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