Jump to content

DNP?

Nurses   (1,986 Views 9 Comments)
by pinchy pinchy (New Member) New Member

395 Visitors; 2 Posts

advertisement

I am finishing my second year of nursing and want to work towards becoming a nurse practitioner. I am confused as to the difference between DNP and MS as a FNP. If I attend a school that offers the MS option for becoming a Nurse Practitioner, will I still be able to practice as a NP without going further and getting a DNP?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8,365 Visitors; 839 Posts

Yes. There is no need to have a DNP unless you simply want the extra education. Some people will say that one will need a DNP to become a nurse practictioner in X amount of years.

They're wrong.

If you want to be a NP, then I encourage you to put in about 5 years worth at the bedside. If you don't want to do bedside nursing for more than a year or two, then I would encourage you to look into PA programs.

NP programs are set up in such a way that they assume you have a wide base of clinical knowledge because you've spent years a nurse. Lately, however, it's the trend for nurses to enter into NP school after 1 year or less at the bedside. This sets you up for a very unsafe practice. NP schools do not have the clinical time in their programs to make up for a lack of experience at the bedside.

I know that's advice you didn't ask for, but there you have it. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

happy2learn works as a Employed at a Level 1 Trauma Center.

7,750 Visitors; 1,118 Posts

This is going to depend on where you want to go to school.

The schools by me are making all of the NP & CRNA programs DNP programs in 2012. They are no longer accepting applications for the MSN program. Their last MSN class has been filled.

There are others schools that are not doing this change.

If you become an NP through an approved Master's program, you should not have a problem. Even if they make the requirement for NP's to be DNP's, if you are an NP before then, it won't apply, there will be a grandfathering process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and works as a FNP/WHNP(E)/Educator/MedLeg Consul.

12 Followers; 18 Articles; 135,999 Visitors; 12,985 Posts

Right now, the DNP is only a vision. But, do not totally dismiss the possibility that it will become the terminal degree in 2015.

Right now, the MSN is the degree necessary to be an NP. If the DNP becomes mandatory, those who already are practicing as MSN-prepared NPs will be grandfathered in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8,365 Visitors; 839 Posts

Right now, the DNP is only a vision. But, do not totally dismiss the possibility that it will become the terminal degree in 2015.

A doctorate is always a terminal degree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and works as a FNP/WHNP(E)/Educator/MedLeg Consul.

12 Followers; 18 Articles; 135,999 Visitors; 12,985 Posts

A doctorate is always a terminal degree.

That's correct. But, right now, it is not the degree necessary to practice as an NP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement

8,365 Visitors; 839 Posts

That's correct. But, right now, it is not the degree necessary to practice as an NP.

I think you minimum degree.

Terminal means "the end; or the extreme of something."

A doctorate in nursing is a terminal degree. It's the last and highest degree one can receive in nursing. There are no more after it; hence, "terminal." It can't become terminal in 2015; it already is terminal.

A MSN, currently, is the minimum degree necessary to enter into advanced nursing practice. However, many would like make the terminal degree, a DNP, the degree necessary for entry into advanced nursing practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and works as a FNP/WHNP(E)/Educator/MedLeg Consul.

12 Followers; 18 Articles; 135,999 Visitors; 12,985 Posts

I think we are splitting hairs, but yes, you are correct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SandBetweenMyToes has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Burn Nurse.

1 Article; 5,858 Visitors; 175 Posts

Many (most?) quality NP schools require a minimum of two years full time work experience as an RN before admission to the NP program. This is for very good reason. There are schools out there that will allow you to progress directly from BSN to NP, but in my opinion it is not a good idea.

I just finished my Primary Health Care (Family) Nurse Practitioner, and I can tell you, the clinical portion (I had 750 hours clinical time in my degree), is not much. I had 10 years experience as an RN prior to the program, and I have used every bit of that experience. I cannot imagine going direct entry.

Becoming an NP has a very steep learning curve. There is a reason the better programs require a minimum RN practice time, and simply stated, it is SAFETY.

Do yourself a favor, and get some experience under your belt before getting your NP. I agree with Fribblet in that if you are not planning to work as an RN prior to going on with your education, PA may be a better route for you. Just remember to look at the differences in scopes of practice before you commit to one or the other.

Good luck!

Edited by SandBetweenMyToes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing 0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×