Jump to content

Why two weeks?

School   (631 Views 7 Comments)
by chasinRT chasinRT (Member) Member

3,722 Profile Views; 199 Posts

If lice die off the host in 24 hours, why does everything say to bag things up for two weeks??  Even the CDC website.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OyWithThePoodles has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Med-surg, school nursing..

1 Follower; 1,281 Posts; 12,053 Profile Views

Good question, I have wondered this as well. Nits maybe?

Needing our resident lice expert to chime in. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

3 Followers; 2,589 Posts; 10,359 Profile Views

I am wondering if this is one of those sacred cow things that none of us question.

Of course when RJ junior had the lice in the 2nd grade we got rid of a lot of stuffed animals she never wanted but refused to give up. They all just....disappeared during Licemageddon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

51 Posts; 377 Profile Views

I have pondered this question as well :))))

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UrbanHealthRN has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatric/ Community and Public Health.

195 Posts; 3,115 Profile Views

It all comes down to the nits and very hypothetical worst case scenarios. Picture this:

My child comes home from school needing head lice treatment. After doing all the necessary hair care, I move on to cleaning her bedroom and decide to bag up some stuffed animals on her bed that she always sleeps with.

My daughter's head last had contact with those stuffed animals twelve hours ago. There's a stray, pregnant louse sitting on one of those animals that hasn't died yet.

The louse makes her way into the plastic bag and proceeds to lay her nits the next day before dying. 

The nits don't die, because I somehow leave the plastic bag near a heat source that provides constant warmth. The nits also take a full 10 days to incubate before finally hatching.

After the nits hatch, the new lice turn out to be very hardy and don't die off until nearly 48 hours later. 

The lice are now dead, 2 weeks have passed, and I proceed to take the stuffed animals back out of the bag and give them back to my daughter.

The end.

That's science for ya!

 

Edited by UrbanHealthRN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OldDude specializes in Pediatrics.

7 Followers; 1 Article; 4,782 Posts; 30,070 Profile Views

56 minutes ago, UrbanHealthRN said:

It all comes down to the nits and very hypothetical worst case scenarios. Picture this:

My child comes home from school needing head lice treatment. After doing all the necessary hair care, I move on to cleaning her bedroom and decide to bag up some stuffed animals on her bed that she always sleeps with.

My daughter's head last had contact with those stuffed animals twelve hours ago. There's a stray, pregnant louse sitting on one of those animals that hasn't died yet.

The louse makes her way into the plastic bag and proceeds to lay her nits the next day before dying. 

The nits don't die, because I somehow leave the plastic bag near a heat source that provides constant warmth. The nits also take a full 10 days to incubate before finally hatching.

After the nits hatch, the new lice turn out to be very hardy and don't die off until nearly 48 hours later. 

The lice are now dead, 2 weeks have passed, and I proceed to take the stuffed animals back out of the bag and give them back to my daughter.

The end.

That's science for ya!

 

This is a pretty good theory!! I'm not convinced a louse would lay an egg on a cold inanimate object but if they did, I'm not convinced you keep your house at a constant 98.6 degrees...otherwise it seems feasible - move over Bill Nye the Science Guy!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UrbanHealthRN has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatric/ Community and Public Health.

195 Posts; 3,115 Profile Views

3 minutes ago, OldDude said:

This is a pretty good theory!! I'm not convinced a louse would lay an egg on a cold inanimate object but if they did, I'm not convinced you keep your house at a constant 98.6 degrees...otherwise it seems feasible - move over Bill Nye the Science Guy!!

I completely agree with you, OldDude! I'm guessing her maternal instincts were kicking in real strong and she just HAD to get those babies out. Do lice have labor contractions? I don't know, lol. 

And as far as the temp goes, this house would definitely not be mine! I'm up in New England, and short of my cat deciding to roost on top of the bag for 10 days, I'd say this scenario's home involves Miami without air conditioning. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×