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KalipsoRed21

KalipsoRed21 BSN

Currently: Home Health

Content by KalipsoRed21

  1. KalipsoRed21

    All these nurses writing articles

    To me this is the problem. To me the mere fact that the hospital only has to follow their own policy regarding staffing is a problem. The fact that JACHO even mentions shareholders in their mission statement is a problem. Yes we all complain about keeping up with building codes, but usually hospitals have building management personnel that are responsible for helping us keep hallways clear and temperatures correct. There is no one helping us keep patients safe. Upper management and accreditation boards are touting that they are making things safer through mandatory paperwork that merely provides lip service to the kind of care we should be able to provide once ratios are adequate and administrative creep is put in check. I am not saying it is upper management’s fault....I realize they a doing their job. What I am saying is that at the point where monies and service collide, we are failing to provide value to those we are serving. And like our government currently, instead of coming up with a plan that makes changes that the public are demanding (good care at a reasonable cost) policy and regulation continue to focus on paperwork as a means to correct the issue. You can keep adding whatever kind of check lists and check boxes to my day that you want, if the impact of all this extra paperwork and policy never impacts care in a manner which gets us to the goal (good care at a reasonable cost) then their is no point. And I would argue that a by product of all this extra work is a false sense that we are making an impact. Because complying with ‘The Joint commission’ and thus facility policy for the very short time JACHO is ‘in the house’ and then returning to survival mode is ineffective. That me filling out additional paperwork only allows the hospital metrics to look like they’ve been met on paper. If healthcare was actually meeting these metrics then the USA healthcare system would NOT look like the over priced piece of crap that it does on the world market. I don’t blame management, I don’t blame JACHO, but it is obvious to me that this system we have is not working, so no, I don’t have a lot of respect for it. I do blame shareholders for their profit margins when it is obvious the system is not working in favor of those it is suppose to serve. I also blame elected officials for the same reason.
  2. KalipsoRed21

    All these nurses writing articles

    To you advanced degree nurses that like writing all the articles on here, I have a request for an article. I want to know if accrediting agencies actually help healthcare facilities. For example JACHO: “OurMission: To continuously improve health care for the public, in collaboration with other stakeholders, by evaluating health care organizations and inspiring them to excel in providing safe and effective care of the highest quality and value. “ Do all the JACHO nit picky crazy regulations actually help quality or has it gotten to the point that accreditation organizations gotten over zealous with regulation and box checking that patient care is actually worsening even though charting and other administrative measures are showing high marks Are we being nit picked apart about measures that have minimal effect while unquantifiable direct care measures, due to the inability to consistently be able to quantify and identify them, being ignored and not valued solely because there is no way to measure for them or just the face that they are not on the ‘list’ of things to monitor? I feel like healthcare is becoming the ‘wanna be’ field. Where we are more often posers for good care through over charting but actual care and facility staff sanity has gone by the wayside. I don’t like my profession...I don’t respect it because we have lost focus due to reimbursement and over regulation. I don’t feel like I can advocate for the good in my career, because while I know TONS of nurses, CNAs, MDs, NPs, etc that care greatly about patients, all of us are stuck doing a *** job because of over regulation and reimbursement strategies. I am all for hospitals making money, and I like rules, but are we over doing it to the point that we are not obtaining the obvious goal of taking good care of people as the minimum standard?
  3. KalipsoRed21

    Sorry nursing

    I like you nursing....almost love....but the constant emotional abuse kinda prevents me to getting to the point of saying, “I LOVE my job.” The most I can muster is, “Well, I like taking care of my patients.” Administrative creep and ensuring the “right“ supporting statements in to my documentation so that we can get “Max reimbursements” really diminishes most of the joy I have in patient care. Because who really enjoys spending 10 minutes assessing a patient and glancing at their record and the next 45 charting about it? We pay too much money for care as a society to be giving such poor service as a profession. I know no one is trying to give poor service, the industry is just set up that way. And because we care beyond the boundaries of a stated job, we spend to much time trying to hit these unattainable time goals for patient care while spending less and less time with those we care about the most in the name of duty. It isn’t honorable, it’s stupid. And on one’s death bed one will not reminisce happily about spending all the extra paid or unpaid time at work doing “the right thing”, one instead will regret all the pointless hours spent on pointless paper work instead of with those you love....because you are a nurse, you know how short time is, and yet we are letting paperwork dictate our lives and separate us from our families....for what? Insurance coverage? Shameful, not noble.
  4. KalipsoRed21

    Arrgghh!!!! Coworkers!!!!!

    Short story: Had a new patient come home Thursday. Bed bound, wound vac, PICC line, hadn’t had a BM in 6 days. Daughter is the main caregiver and overwhelmed. Admission night I spent 2+ hours troubleshooting wound vac and attempting to replace dressing to get it to seal as dressing placed earlier in the day by hospital staff was already leaking when I got there at 6pm. Also changed PICC drsg and caps due to line being so hard to flush that it feels like I’m flushing through a clamped line. It does, however, flush and work. Try to call MD Friday before noon when office closed twice, no return call. Try to call afterhours MD twice, no return call. I do know, however, that MD on call got my messages because along with informing about difficulties with wound vac seal, plans to do wet to dry until Monday, as I had gone through all the wound vac supplies that were sent home with patient, confirming with wound vac service that order for additional supplies had been made but Apria not able to tell me ETA of delivery, I also asked for Nystatin powder for groin fold yeast infection. Well when I got to the home for follow up visit daughter was getting call from pharmacy about nystatin powder. Friday visit leak had reoccurred to wound vac. I attempted to troubleshoot and replace, started to leak again 10min after placement. Took it off and reviewed wet to dry with daughter. She is not taking to it well. Was there from 3-5:20pm and still didn’t get to teach SASH again to daughter because I had to teach wet to dry. Plus PICC still hard to flush and daughter had difficulty flushing. Medicare/Medicaid patient thus ataplace needs to be set up through outpatient infusion center can’t go to ER to do it....and to be honest in the 6 years I did ER at the 4 different facilities I worked at, the only place that was willing to see the patient in the ER for ataplace was a tiny 20 bed hospital with a 3 bed ER that used their ER as an infusion center as well. All of the larger facilities wouldn’t do it as an ER visit. Problem with setting this up with an outpatient infusion center over the weekend is the patient/daughter use a state funded transportation system that requires 3 day notice for transportation. So while the line isn’t flushing great the 24hour pump for Zosyn is working. So the second day I see this patient I get that I need additional supplies to make the wound vac work appropriately, supplies are orders but probably won’t make it there until Monday. I will need to set up outpatient infusion appointment and transportation but next week is Thanksgiving so who knows how that is going to mess with that! Also kinda getting the feeling patient needs placement and that daughter isn’t going to be able to handle all this for long. I will try to do all this Monday but at 5:20pm on a Friday I can’t do anything about it. The line is working well enough for infusion to go in, The daughter is still wanting to try to take care of patient at home, so I don’t see a reason to send her to the ER. I have the patient added to the schedule for the weekend staff to see her at 3pm each day. Write orders for wet to dry to be preformed at each visit, please reinforce wet to dry education with daughter. Flush both lines to PICC and heparin lock red line. Then change zosyn bag and restart pump. If you have time review SASH with daughter. Also sent email to all social workers (but they don’t work weekends) that patient likely going to need placement to SNF due to daughter overwhelmed with care needs. Discussed this plan with my manager and sent out an even more descriptive email to all weekend staff with the same information I provided here. Please call with questions and gave them my personal cell phone number. I’ll be damned if these ***es weren’t calling me going: “Well it sounds like she should have never been discharged from the hospital.” I’m like “No ***, but she was and here we are and no I don’t see a reason to send her to the ER.” “Well I have wound vac supplies but you were there over 2 hours Thursday and Friday...” And again I’m like, “That’s why I wrote for wet to dry dressings over the weekend, so you wouldn’t be there screwing with a wound vac for 2 hours like I was and I will attempt to deal with it again on Monday.” “Well she would be sent to the ER for ataplace, I mean if the PICC is that hard to flush can you even trust the medication is going in at the rate it should?!” Again I’m like “Hard to flush is not unable to use. Yes I did check and the continuous infusion over 24 hours with an elastomeric ball is working appropriately. You will still have some in the ball when you get there because on Thursday I saw her at 6pm for a 7pm dose. And yesterday I got there at 3pm and started it at 4pm. So if you go see her today at 3pm and change it there will be a little bit left, but I’ve been trying to move the dosing back so that no one is going out at 6pm to see her.” “Well, so you are wasting drug?!” Am I working with a bunch of idiots or what?!?!?! Like I tried really hard to make it as easy as possible for them to get through the weekend as possible. WOW!?!?!?! Yes, she is a mess, yes she needs to be in a SNF, but she was discharged home with home care. I really feel what that means is that we have to now deal with this mess until it can get straighted out. Of course I would send her to the ER if I thought she wasn’t getting her medications or it looked like the daughter was not going to be able to care for her at all, but it is more like the daughter may be able to do it if she just calms down and pays attention. Right now she is overwhelmed and afraid....ultimately I think she will choose to have her mother take to SNF, but the patient is AxOx3 and currently the daughter is trying not to let her mom down. None of that requires ER admission...stupid effing co workers. I don’t know why I even spent the time writing it all down and making the orders.
  5. KalipsoRed21

    I Was Fired...for Being Abrasive and Having Attitude

    “Old school” does not mean it is not evidenced base. True, as stated in my original post “....nurse was practicing ‘old school’ BUT NOT ‘evidence based’ was to let her show me what she thought I should be doing and let her do it to the patient.” I sure as ***, as a new grad, would NEVER tell a nurse who has been practicing 10,15,20+ years that I think s/he is doing something that is not evidence based. That IS NOT the place of a new grad....period, never, ever. To believe there is an absolute right and wrong in medicine is just juvenile at best. There is policy and actions not in the policy. The idea of right and wrong do not belong in a field where the best choice of action is a medical OPINION. Not to mention that MOST facilities do not implement the latest evidence based practices for YEARS after the studies have been completed. The only exceptions to that are university/research institutions. So doing something “old school” BUT NOT “evidence based” is not necessarily wrong, but possibly not optimal. Thus the importance of getting another nurse that you trust more and preferably has some authority to go over with you what the nurse you don’t trust as much has shown you. And will allow you, the new grad, to confront the nurse when s/he sees you doing something a way they didn’t show you, as no experienced nurse is going to trust the course of action taken by a new grad when it conflicts with how they practice.
  6. KalipsoRed21

    Referral Fee/Bonus?

    So my sister in law is harping on me. She works with a lawyer who does Mesothelioma cases. She tells me that this lawyer will give me 100K for every referral that ends up being a case he can do something with. I have tried to tell her that I don’t think I can do that due to Stark Laws. I’ve never been much of a saleswoman anyway. But then I think, is this how those law nurse consultants get rich? Is this legal? Any thoughts?
  7. KalipsoRed21

    Help...need AWAY from bedside but don't know where to go...

    Read Dave Ramsey’s “The total money makeover.” Revamp your budget and learn to live off of half of what you make (yes it is possible). Then your need for money won’t take over your desire to live.
  8. KalipsoRed21

    I Was Fired...for Being Abrasive and Having Attitude

    Well as poopy as it must feel to get fired, it is better to be let go than struggle to fit in where you don’t. But for the next year it is SUPER important that you quit telling people what you know or what you think you know and just be greatful for ANY advice you are given.....even if you think it is incorrect. My way around ruffling feathers when I was new and pretty sure a nurse was practicing ‘old school’ but not ‘evidence based’ was to let her show me what she thought I should be doing and let her do it to the patient. Chart that you were assisted by nurse so n’ so for that procedure. And when I had the next one, grab a different senior nurse I may have trusted a little more to watch me do it. If she said I did it correct or showed me something different I would start practicing that way. If the first nurse said something about what I was doing then I could just say, “Well —— told me to do it this way.” Maybe we should all talk together? Most likely no one will want to have a group meeting about whatever it is you are doing and you just continue to do things the way you were shown by the nurse you trusted more. I know it seems like a long way around, and it is, but this is how to be humble.
  9. I have spent 11 years as a nurse. I have had the experience of floor nursing, tele, cardiac step down, emergency, travel, infusion, and now home health. I wish I could tell you I felt the $47,000 dollars I invested for a BSN were worth it, but I don’t. I, after 11 years as a nurse, would tell you to change your degree or take a lower paying job in any other career field job at $10 an hour to start. In the long run you probably will be happier and end up with greater income potential. In 2008 when I started as a tele floor RN, I made 20.47/hr which was a dollar an hour more than anyone who came to the position never being a nurse aid prior to their first RN position. I now make $29.71/ hr as a home health nurse. I do not get mileage, as they gave me a car. I feel that is important to note because so many want to try to inflate the benefit of getting paid mileage when it is menial. Not to mention the hours that I spend charting without getting paid because when I actually clocked in all my hours I would get in trouble. So, as with ALL of my nursing positions, it is expected that I get 60 hours of work done in 40 hours of time even though that goal is not realistic. And if I continue to clock the hours it actually takes me to do the job at the expectations that have been laid before me by the organization and the oath I took, I will continue to get in trouble by my employer for not meeting expectations. For those who wish to say, “Well maybe you are just not successful at nursing.” “Maybe nursing isn’t your cup of tea?” I am a very successful nurse. I have had awards at 4 of my positions. I have never been fired, or been written up even. But the continued disrespect of my time AT EVERY POSITION I’VE HELD in the name of nursing being a career of ‘sacrifice’ is a lie fed to us to increase profits and screw patients. Yes, I LOVE my patients. The thought of failing them and leaving them to this crappy world of medicine is a large reason I stay. But that reason is starting to fade. The realization that the only people I can rely on is my family and I cannot continue to let my oath to my patients continue to impede that precious little time I have to spend with them. Especially when that time is to propitiate a machine that is allowing patients to become more entitled and less considerate about what I sacrifice to serve them. Or to be used as a cog to increase profits for hospitals or insurance companies while my wages stagnate and my patients suffer due to the all to common expectations to do more with less. It is not worth it. If you cannot be a salesman for medicine or think of people as dollar signs, then do not go into medicine. If you think you will make a decent living and that the school debt is worth it, it may be, but only if you start with an associates degree or plan to go into management 2 years after you get your BSN. I wish I could advise you differently. I wish I could tell you that all the sacrifices you made to get where you are were meaningful and will lead you to great things, but I can’t. For most of you it won’t. The idea that nursing is a ‘calling’ is a subtle way to keep us under paid and permanent scapegoat for the field of medicine. The only thing to improve these conditions would be unions. We have to fight for fair pay and reasonable job expectations and the best way to do that is unified.
  10. KalipsoRed21

    Nurses Charged in Deaths of 12 Nursing Home Residents

    More than 100 years ago, state and territorial governments established BONs to protect the public's health and welfare by overseeing and ensuring the safe practice of nursing. BONs achieve this mission by outlining the standards for safe nursing care and issuing licenses to practice nursing. Once a license is issued, the board's job continues by monitoring licensees' compliance to jurisdictional laws and taking action against the licenses of those nurses who have exhibited unsafe nursing practice. Nurse to patient ratios sounds like part of “outlining the standards for safe nursing care” to me. No not all errors are related to ratios. My point is there isn’t a good way to judge the error as a decisive act of the nurse (impaired judgement, unsafe, un ethical) when the ratios are not already in place. If you are going to work and it feels like Russian roulette as opposed to organized chaos, well then how can ANY error be appropriately analyzed if the situation was unsafe to start? And from judgements I’ve read the BON often judges in a manner that goes something like this, “It is the nurse’s duty to protect the patient and s/he should have recognized the unsafe situation and wrote it down on a piece of paper so we could tell that they knew it was dangerous and so that we know they said something to their manager. “ Giant eye roll here. It’s like signing up for karate tournament in one on one combat and then suddenly 5 opponents are in front of you. You say something about it and are told that this is what you signed up for by the coaches and then the judges (BON) tell you that you have poor execution of your skills because otherwise you would have beaten all your opponents when you were suppose to only have one.
  11. KalipsoRed21

    When Should I Retire? My Struggle

    “I lack enthusiasm for the Flavor of the Month. I zone out if someone starts saying they want to “move the needle” or do or don’t have the “bandwidth” to “pick the low-hanging fruit”. Just don’t admonish nurses to be “more resilient” when taking away resources. It’s not an opportunity to “do less with more”, it’s short-staffing” I loved that statement! Anyway, I think retirement is a USA problem. We are an ageist society. Why isn’t it beneficial for employers to allow elderly to work at a slower pace with less expected hours? Why can’t they see the value in their experience as something worthy of the pay even if they aren’t the most ‘efficient’ part of the work force? I feel that experience is something sorely undervalued and the reverence for it has been in steady decline along with union labor and the rise of ‘right to work’ standards in the US. Us younger people need very experienced mentors more than we realize.....not the RN who is your senior by 9 months. Also this problem is more related to work culture in America because we work all the darn time. We do not cultivate ourselves much out of our work identity which leads to such a feeling of loss when you no longer are going to work. We are terrible at realizing how short our time is on this planet and believe that the whole idea of, “If you don’t like the time requirements of the job then get another one.” Instead of a more practical, “This is my life, how do I fit this job into it.” Such a lack of flexibility in US work culture, but I do hope that millennials fix that. Everyone complains about how they don’t want to work. I feel they want to live and do some work, but our work culture isn’t set up that way, although most employers could make it that way if their profit margins were smaller. Good luck to you on your journey.
  12. KalipsoRed21

    Nurses Charged in Deaths of 12 Nursing Home Residents

    I don’t miss understand their mission. Their mission is not accomplishing anything worthy of having them exist in their current state.
  13. KalipsoRed21

    Nurses Charged in Deaths of 12 Nursing Home Residents

    That’s just a lot of excuses not to act if you ask me. Very basic things will get missed and I highly doubt as retarded as judgments that I have read by several BONs are that they would rule in the nurses favor if she had to many patients and missed something ‘simple’. Which, to me, defeats the purpose of protecting the public from a ‘bad nurse”. It reminds me of a Facebook page post I recently read stating something like, “Nurses aren’t running around like crazy because they are competing against each other for the Daisy award. They are doing it in hopes of not being “the one” who missed something important.” I feel this is a pretty common feeling, especially in facility and hospital nursing. There is nothing professional about playing hit potato with people’s lives then having a BON judge those who dropped it as incompetent. That is just stupid. So respectfully, I don’t feel that any BON is doing their job to protect the public appropriately. I get that they aren’t here to boost nurses, or be political, or protect nurses, but they aren’t protecting the public either.
  14. KalipsoRed21

    Legal obligation for disaster relief

    Interesting paper I just read:https://www.law.berkeley.edu/library/resources/disasters/Anderson.pdf But it is about officers during Hurricane Katrina (as nursing is most definitely not the only career that suffers this issue). Here are some excerpts. ”In any disaster situation, the first three hours are the most critical for response, and can determine the extent of life and property lost.2 After Hurricane Katrina made landfall this past August and the winds dropped below fifty-five miles per hour, the New Orleans Police Department (NOPD) spent its first few hours of search and rescue retrieving almost 300 of own officers from rooftops and attics.” So the “crucial 3 hour” window the police spent most of that time finding their own officers. A benefit of being of the force for sure....or not. How many would have evacuated themselves and their families instead of staying due to their job obligations? ”3 After the storm sixty officers resigned, forty-five were fired,and two committed suicide. Nearly 70% of the police force lost their homes.4 All together the NOPD lost approximately 7% of its officers.5 The failure to plan adequately for police response takes it toll on the community, on the police department, and on individual officers themselves.” ”Yet low pay and under-funding are consistent problems for the city’s eight police districts. As of July 2004, entry level New Orleans police officers made $27,508 ($37,363 in 2019 money)in base salary, with an additional approximately $5000 ($6791 in 2019) of benefits that included a uniform allowance and payment for mileage. A police sergeant made $38,119 ($51,774 in 2019) in base salary and an assistant superintendent $62,096.13 ($84,341 in 2019) The only current standard issue equipment for police officers are their gun, badge, radio & nightstick – individuals are responsible for their own uniforms, gun belts, raincoats, and handcuffs. Many officers work second jobs to make ends meet.14 *in 2019 was just me using an inflation calculator to get the same salaries in today’s money. I don’t feel like those wages differ to much from nursing salaries. It is like all of USA is wanting those in public services to sacrifice their lives for free. Not to mention the second part of the contract ( I feel) is self accountability. Citizens fall so far below the realm of taking responsibility for themselves and their families that it is really hard for public servants to keep up our end of the ‘ethical’ code. I never disliked people as much as I have learned to since I’ve become a nurse, which just makes me care less to put my life in peril for one of them.
  15. KalipsoRed21

    What city do you work in and how much do you get paid hourly?

    Home Heath - 11 yrs experience - closest big city is Saint Louis, MO but the job is in Illinois. $29.71/ hour (I do not get mileage as they provide the car and the gas.) Required to work every 3rd weekend with one of the 2 days on call and also on call 2-3 other days a month. On Call you get $2 an hour unless called out then you get time and a half for as long as it takes to do the call. Weekend differential is $5.
  16. KalipsoRed21

    Save yourself; get out of medicine.

    Personal opinion. I have spent 11 years as a nurse. I have had the experience of floor nursing, tele, cardiac step down, emergency, travel, infusion, and now home health. I wish I could tell you I felt my $47,000 dollars for a BSN were worth it, but I don’t. I, after 11 years as a nurse, would tell you to change your degree or take a lower paying job in any other career field job at $10 an hour to start. In the long run you probably will be happier and end up with greater income potential. In 2008 when I started as a tele floor RN, I made 20.47/hr which was a dollar an hour more than anyone who can to the position never being a nurse aid prior to their first RN Yes, I LOVE my patients. The thought of failing them and the crappy world of medicine I would be leaving them with is a large reason I stay. But that reason is starting to fade. The realization that the only people I can rely on is my family and I cannot continue to let my oath to my patients continue to impede that. It is not worth it. If you cannot be a salesman for medicine or think of people as dollar signs, then do not go into medicine. If you think you will make a decent living and that the school debt is worth it, it may be, but only if you start with an associates degree or plan to go into management 2 years after you get your BSN. I wish I could advise you differently. I wish I could tell you that all the sacrifices you made to get where you are were meaningful and will lead you to great things, but I can’t. For most of you it won’t. The idea that nursing is a ‘calling’ is a subtle way to keep us under paid and permanent scapegoat for the field of medicine, don’t be one of the dunces that fell for it like I did.
  17. KalipsoRed21

    Legal obligation for disaster relief

    Agree with you wholeheartedly. Nursing is not more important than my life, my family, and my needs. I would need A WHOLE lot more pay and/or benefits for me to consider it to be. Also I don’t think that EMS/police/electric crews should be putting their lives on the line either for Hurricanes. You know they are coming get out or take your chances, don’t call 911.
  18. KalipsoRed21

    Legal obligation for disaster relief

    Wow, so insightful. Thank you for posting your experience. I agree that so much needs to be done to strengthen a nurses’ power to say no and to force hospitals to be more appropriately prepared for disasters. So much legislation needed. Thank you.
  19. KalipsoRed21

    Nurses Charged in Deaths of 12 Nursing Home Residents

    Because if their mission is to make sure the public is safe, and their is like a TON of evidence based articles demonstrating the poor out comes for patients when nurses ratios get to high, AND there is a recommendation from the ANA on what the ratios should be, then all of their judgments on nurses should first be based on if the ratios are appropriate. If there are articles upon articles demonstrating how nurses fail when ratios are high, then any nurse complaint brought to the board should be nulled if the nurse to patient ratio was not at the recommended level. We have scientific proof that increased misses and death occur in patients when the ratios are to high, how can they possibly make an accurate judgement as to if that nurse was practicing poorly or if s/he was overwhelmed and it was a slip through if the ratios are not at the recommended levels to keep the patients safe?
  20. KalipsoRed21

    They almost had me fooled

    Yeah, I like IV teams too. I love PICCs though. It would be best to have both, but maybe ask to float to the ER once in a while....or just go down there 2 full shifts and do nothing but start IVs and draw blood. It’s a real skill booster.
  21. KalipsoRed21

    Save yourself; get out of medicine.

    I discourage others because I honestly feel the healthcare system is not effective and a lie. I discourage others because there is no REASON anyone in this field should be suffering from experiences like this. I am not a fatalist. I am a realist. Realistically I feel nurses are more likely to be punished for a no right answer situation today than they have been in the past, all for the sake of the almighty dollar. I don’t feel that risk is one that should be undertaken for the shell of a profession. I wish I had known when I decided to be a nurse that I wasn’t going to be helping people, that I was mostly going to be a scapegoat for money hungry business practices. And I feel this way about nursing, doctors, teaching, policing, and EMS.
  22. KalipsoRed21

    Nurses Charged in Deaths of 12 Nursing Home Residents

    That is the plight of all BONs. They aren’t established for nurses, they are for the public. HOWEVER, if they really wanted to protect the public they would all be pushing for legislation that requires better staffing ratios.
  23. KalipsoRed21

    Save yourself; get out of medicine.

    I am on a Facebook page that is entitled ‘Nurses With Cards’ and this was something someone posted today and it resonates with me. I understand that some of you have found jobs you enjoy in nursing. That is great and I am glad you were fortunate. I just really feel that more often than not the experiences are like mine and that is a problem for our profession and for ourselves as future patients. There are 2.8k responses to this post so far and many of them show camaraderie. I never wanted to be a big shot in this profession. But I do feel that with the time put in school, and the responsibilities required we all deserve WAY better than how we are being treated. My favorite part of what that nurse had to say was when she mentioned that we aren’t competing to win the Daisy Award, we are just trying to make sure we aren’t ‘the one’ who forgot something that costs someone their life. ‘The one’ who gets fired and his/her license taken away because ‘They should have know better. You always put the patient first.’ Although he/she did it just wasn’t the right patient at the right time because he/she was overwhelmed. Then everyone’s response turns to, “ Well then he/she should have spoke up.” Speak up about what?! This is averagely how the job is. This is what he/she has been told is their responsibility. And the first 3-5 times they did speak up they got in trouble. Come on, no one who has had this be the majority of their nursing experience can see this profession as good. “THIS is why I'm retired! Loooong rant: Do you want to know why so many "good" nurses are leaving hospital floors to work in home health, administration, nurse practitioner or clinics? Let's put this into perspective. Your mom is really sick. So sick that if she gets any worse they will have to move her to ICU. She is getting IV medications and is constantly needing help navigating around her room to go to the bathroom, get in the chair or reposition in the bed. She was independent before she came to the hospital but because she is sick she is a little weak and has tubes and monitors hooked to her 24/7. Now imagine that the same nurse who is taking care of your mom for the next 12 hours has 5-6 other patients. This nurse has been out of school 1-2 years and has worked the last several days in a row because the floor is constantly understaffed. But the nurse will have help, right? Like there are aids and charge nurses? Each nurse aid has anywhere from 12-18 patients each. The charge nurse is responsible for keeping the floor running smoothly but is also responsible for four patients. Now, your mom needs help getting to the bathroom, but at the same time, one patient is having a hard time breathing, another patient's blood transfusion needs to be changed, a patient's family member is yelling down the hall about pain meds, and an elderly patient is trying to get out of bed. Who would you choose to see? Do you let your elderly patient fall? Do you get the man his pain meds? Do you go change the infusion and check your patient for adverse reactions? Do you go make sure the man is breathing? Or do you help the lady go to the restroom? Personally if it was my mom, I would want someone to help her to the bathroom. I would want someone to make sure she didn't fall or pull her IV out, but the fact of the matter is, she is at the bottom of the priority list. Do you want your nurses having to make these decisions every day because management refuses to fully staff a floor? What if I told you that CEOs and administration get huge bonuses for lowering costs, while nurses kill their selves to not make any life threatening mistakes? Because in reality, nurses are not competing to see who can win a Daisy award; they are competing to make sure that they aren't "the one" that misses something that cost someone their life. Something has to change! Edit: I had no idea my little post would resonate with so many people! The response by nurses has been both amazing and saddening. It breaks my heart to hear people left the profession they loved or that things have been the same for years. Nothing will change if nothing changes! Nurse on!”
  24. KalipsoRed21

    Save yourself; get out of medicine.

    I wish it were a feasible thing to go back to school. Agriculture sounds like it would be interesting. But I knew when I started nursing school there would be no second chances at college. There would be no changing my career in the middle of the program either. I have to many friends that have 60k of debt from doing that and still have no degree and a job that might be decent if they didn’t have a second mortgage they were paying every month. No way to get it written off or forgiven. I was fortunate, but really not fortunate, to have my inheritance from my dad’s passing to pay off my student loans. Otherwise I would still have 15 years of payments left. I will never put my self at the mercy of a paycheck in that manner ever again. I love people and the idea of teaching others to be healthy. However, I find that nursing is more about paperwork than actually getting to deal with people, and that the time allotted to actually teach your patient’s the things they need to know to be successful at home is abysmal to non existent....I work home health now and while there is more time that I use to have, it is still abysmal to the amount that would be required to do a good job; mostly because the paperwork in home health is gargantuan compared to the hospital. A career should be a part of one’s life, but in all my nursing careers it has over taken my life. Even currently as a home health nurse I am suppose to be working 3, 8-hour shifts a week. That’s 48 hours a pay period. I went back and looked, I have not worked less than 62 hours a pay period since I started 18 months ago. I average 80. I, at most when begged, will pick up 2 shifts a month. Still shouldn’t have me averaging 80 hrs every 2 weeks. But with mandatory on call...which is mandatory over time, and “sorry I know 6 patients a day is what you are suppose to see but you need to take 7 today.” there is no stopping the additional hours. I’ve tried saying no. I started looking for another job....again. I let them know I have interviews; and their response was, “Well you were completely compensated for all the time you worked.” So yes, I have heard of other home health agencies not paying their nurses hourly and I really am lucky that I work for one that provides complete compensation for the time put in HOWEVER, that is not my point and I will never be satisfied with that sort of response....which is pretty much the standard response as I am on my like 7th nursing job. I want to work the hours I agreed to work, no more. I don’t want to be in a stupid committee, participate in hospital fundraising, or any of that crap (I do though because I have found if you don’t managers make your life harder.). Furthermore, I am just getting to the point that working weekends and holidays are no longer acceptable, being on call is not okay, and I don’t really give a rats *** that people think ‘that is the name of the game’. I am done with this game. But then you go apply for medical assistant jobs or phlebotomists positions and you don’t even get called in for the interview.
  25. KalipsoRed21

    Illinois License by Endorsement

    6 weeks for the temp license and 6 months for the real deal. That was in 2012.
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