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MilesRN

MilesRN BSN, MSN, DNP

Registered Nurse, Educator
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  1. MilesRN

    Is getting your DNP worth it?

    So, here is my two cents. I would like to know where the idea originated that being a nurse and holding any terminal degree we are not permitted the use the title "Doctor". Any individual from any discipline/profession who earns a doctorate from PhD, EdD, MD, DNP, DrPh, etc, is afforded that title of Doctor. Are we precluded legally by our Boards of Nursing? I have investigated this issue extensively. My board does not prohibit nurses from instructing themselves to patients or others as a doctor. They are required however to clarify their role as an RN, NP, etc. We should be proud of our accomplishments including the attainment of an advanced degree, and not sell ourselves short. Sincerely; G. A. Thompson, DNP, RN
  2. MilesRN

    Have a Bachelors, Do I Really Need a BSN?

    Keep in mind the acceptance of previous credit varies between colleges and universities. First, having a bachelors degree makes one eligible for graduate work including a nursing master. Some colleges offer graduate entry nursing programs for those with a nonnursing undergraduate degree. Consider (online) colleges such as Excelsior College as they offer an RN-MSN program. They may grant credit for your nursing program toward the program. You will still have to take upper-level undergraduate nursing regardless of previous lower undergraduate work. Also, consider CELP exams as they offer lower cost of obtaining college credit. Generally, most colleges may not accept nursing credit courses older than 10 years. However, this is worth investigating as I obtained my BSN from a college that accepted all my previous coursework including my nursing. Do your homework and conduct an extensive search it will pay off in the end. Best to you
  3. MilesRN

    Have a Bachelors, Do I Really Need a BSN?

    Good luck to you on your decision. Since you have a bachelor's might you consider an RN to MSN track? I recommend looking to an MSN in nursing leadership and administration. This would open many other doors that a BSN may not. Best. Gregg Thompson, DNP, MSN, BSN, RN
  4. MilesRN

    Difference between Ph.D and Ed.D

    I have to respectfully disagree with you regarding the difference between the EdD and Ph.D. In most cases, both the Ph.D. and EdD require an original research dissertation. I have actually conducted extensive research on all types of doctorates from research oriented to professional/practice. There is, however, a slight variation with the EdD from college to college. Certainly, most colleges still require the dissertation for the EdD, while a few have transitioned to a capstone project. The EdD tends to be more applied in the application of knowledge. In selecting a Ph.D. or EdD, I recommend you determine the end goal. If research is your passion, then, select the Ph.D. If you are interested in a college leadership then, select the EdD. If you select an EdD be certain the program requires a dissertation. Especially, if you decide on teaching at the collegiate level. You might also consider where you desire to teach. I am few regions of the country for instance where I reside, the trend is a Ph.D., or a professional doctorate such as the DNP for nursing. Best of luck
  5. MilesRN

    DNP/PhD Study

    The best advice is selecting the right program for you. The DNP is a viable option to the extensive time commitment of a Ph.D. Additionally, if looking for a doctorate degree one must consider the end goal. Are you interested in a research career? Then, the PhD is a good choice. If you are more inclined to clinical or an applied approach, then select the DNP. Either will serve you well as both are terminal degrees. I would recommend if selecting a DNP, find one that offers a specialization such as leadership, administration, or a clinical track for APRNs. Do not believe the DNP is an inferior degree. I challenge anyone to dispute the rigors of doctoral study unless they have finished a degree program. Doctoral study requires an extensive time commitment, tenacity, and perseverance. Keep in mind only approximately 1.5 percent of the entire population has a doctorate for a reason, it's very challenging. Remember, many faculties hold clinical doctorates to include JD, MD, PsyD, PharmD, and the like. Persons with the DNP are now obtaining tenure and even administrative positions such as Deans at universities across the U.S. I would recommend searching the job board and reviewing educational requirements for Faculty. You will find the DNP is now accepted as a viable doctoral degree and may be preferred over the EdD. If one is interested in obtaining a PhD after finishing a DNP, then, you might consider Indiana University of Pennsylvania. They offer a DNP to Phd requiring 33 hours to complete. The program is distance mediated and requires attending on ground classes twice per semester. Good luck in your search for the right program
  6. MilesRN

    DNP/PHD Dual Program Opinions

    The best advice is selecting the right program for you. The DNP is a viable option to the extensive time commitment of a Ph.D. Additionally, if looking for a doctorate degree one must consider the end goal. Are you interested in a research career? Then, the PhD is a good choice. If you are more inclined to clinical or an applied approach, then select the DNP. Either will serve you well as both are terminal degrees. I would recommend if selecting a DNP, find one that offers a specialization such as leadership, administration, or a clinical track for APRNs. Do not believe the DNP is an inferior degree. I challenge anyone to dispute the rigors of doctoral study unless they have finished a degree program. Doctoral study requires an extensive time commitment, tenacity, and perseverance. Keep in mind only approximately 1.5 percent of the entire population has a doctorate for a reason, it's very challenging. Remember, many faculties hold clinical doctorates to include JD, MD, PsyD, PharmD, and the like. Persons with the DNP are now obtaining tenure and even administrative positions such as Deans at universities across the U.S. I would recommend searching the job board and reviewing educational requirements for facuilty. You will find the DNP is now accepted as a viable doctoral degree and may actually be preferred over the EdD. If one is interested in obtaining a PhD after finishing a DNP, then, you might consider Indiana University of Pennsylvania. They offer a DNP to Phd requiring 33 hours to complete. The program is distance mediated and requires attending on ground classes twice per semester. Good luck in your search for the right program
  7. MilesRN

    College selection for doctoral program

    ( I apologize for the poor grammar). I always find it very interesting the bias and negative information against schools to include Walden University or Capella. I graduated from as you say from the "cheesy" "diploma mill" of Walden University in 2006 with an MSN. Walden is accredited and accepted within academia. I am living proof these programs are a viable option. The program at Walden was extremely rigorous and to meet graduation requirements I had to complete an extensive project and portfolio. Upon graduation, I acquired a faculty position at a "real" university. The brick and mortar university had no problem accepting my degree from Walden. Actually, many faculty from the same university selected to obtain their graduate degree from them. The real issue is regional and programmatic accreditation from agencies such as CCNE or ACEN. Walden certainly holds accreditation from CCNE and regional accreditation from HLC. Attending Walden has proven a great investment and I would recommend them to anyone. Additionally, if looking for a doctorate degree one must consider the end goal. Are you interested in a research career? Then, the PhD is a good choice. If you are more inclined to clinical or an applied approach, then select the DNP. Either will serve you well as both are terminal degrees. I would recommend if selecting a DNP, you find one that offers a specialization such as leadership, administration, or a clinical track for APRNs. Do not believe the DNP is an inferior degree. I challenge anyone to dispute the rigors of doctoral study unless they have finished a degree program. Doctoral study requires an extensive time commitment, tenacity, and perseverance. Keep in mind only approximately 1.5 percent of the entire population has a doctorate for a reason, it's very challenging. Remember, many faculties hold clinical doctorates to include JD, MD, PsyD, PharmD, and the like. Persons with the DNP are now obtaining tenure and even administrative positions such as Deans at universities across the U.S. I would recommend searching the job board and reviewing educational requirements for facuilty. You will find the DNP is now accepted as a viable doctoral degree and may actually be preferred over the EdD. As a final note, I earned my DNP (online) last November and as a result, now hold a real academic appointment at a brick and mortar college.
  8. MilesRN

    College selection for doctoral program

    I always find it very interesting the bias and negative information against schools such as Walden University or Capella. I graduated from as you say the cheesy, "diploma mill" of Walden University in 2006 with an MSN. Walden is accredited and accepted within academia. The program was extremly rigorous and to meet graduation requirements I had to complete an extensive graduate project and portfolio. Upon graduating from Walden I acquired a faculty postion at a "real" university. The brick and morter university which had no problem accepting my degree from Walden. Actually, many faculty from the same university investigated Walden and obtained their graduate degree from them. The real issue is regional accrediation and programmatic accrediation from the CCNE. Walden certainly holds both of these degrees. Attending Walden has proven a great investment and I would recommend them to anyone. Additionally, if looking for a doctorate degree one must consider the end goal. Are you interested in a research career? Then, select a PhD. If you are more inclined to clinical or an applied approach then the DNP is a great choice. Either degree will serve you well. I would recommend if selecting a DNP you find one that offers a specialization such as leadership or administration. Do not believe the DNP is an inferiour degree. Persons with the DNP are now obtaining tenure at many universities. I would recommend searching the job board and reviewing educational requirements for facuilty. Most now require either the PhD or DNP for a faculty appointment. DNPs are actually acquring Dean appointments. As a final note, I earned my DNP (online) last november and as a result now hold aa real academic position as professor.
  9. MilesRN

    Going to be dismissed from BSN program

    I live in the great state of Ohio, and we were told nearly 30 years ago that LPN's would be phased out. Well, here were are and they are still here. Many hospitals had eliminated the LPNs but not they are actively recruting them again. I would recommend a letter of appeal and request a meeting with the program Dean. If you want to be a nurse you will find a way. If this is your dream do not give up. Many outstanding nurses were not successful their first time in nursing school. Have you found a mentor/tutor? There are many resources available to help you. Look at Test Success by Nugent & Vitale available at Barnes and Noble. Purchase a NCLEX review book. Study and do practice questions each day.
  10. MilesRN

    MSN in Education or DNP

    I believe you should consider a MSN with concentration of nursing education. However, I recommend you explore programs offering the new AACN master's essentials. The new programs include courses in patho, pharmacology, advanced assessment, and an area of focus. Traditional nurse educator programs have not included a clinical component, and the updated curriculum will improve marketability. I disagree that all educators need a clinical specialty such as CNS or NP. Certainly, we need advanced practice educators, but not all faculty need preparation in advanced practice. However, clinically focused masters usually do not include courses in education. If you feel the need for clinical preparation, search for programs offering a combined track in education and a clinical specialty like the CNS. Some newer programs offer the combined track. As a nurse educator (MSN in nursing ed) teaching at the collegiate level for nearly ten years, I have taught content from assessment to mental-health nursing. Consequently, not all colleges or universities require the clinical track. If you are concerned about which path to complete, you might contact deans/directors of nursing programs in your area via email. Request they recommend the education preferred for faculty. Finally, I would recommend you consider an MSN program first before proceeding with a doctorate. The MSN will provide opportunity to enter nursing academia and explore teaching options. Best to you with your decision.
  11. MilesRN

    Current Walden University Students

    So, what's the verdict?
  12. MilesRN

    applying for MSN without RN working experience???

    Greetings, I already have a Master's Degree in Nursing. At present, I have started course work at an online University with hopes of completing the PhD in Nursing. Thanks
  13. MilesRN

    Clinical Nurse Leadership for an experienced RN

    Are you looking into Nursing Leadership and Administration programs. I guess there is some confusion? Thanks
  14. MilesRN

    Current Walden University Students

    Congrats for working on the BSN. You will not regret getting the BSN. Yes, St. Joseph's College is online. Here is a link for other programs for you to peruse. Have fun. http://www.allonlineschools.com/
  15. MilesRN

    Current Walden University Students

    I would recommend looking into the University of Phoenix and St. Joseph's College in Maine (http://www.sjcme.edu) Both offer the duel degree programs. Of course there are many other programs to consider. Have you considered Excelsior College? They have the RN to MSN track. They offer two tracks Clinical Systems Management and Education.
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