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Willow Moonsidhe

Willow Moonsidhe

RN in Home Health
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  1. Willow Moonsidhe

    Please help me, I'm in trouble.

    You made a mistake and nurses are human. Sounds like you have gotten solid advice from the post but I will be praying for you and your family. Willow
  2. Willow Moonsidhe

    The Downward Spiral: Incivility in Nursing

    I took both articles out as even though I quoted who wrote it and gave reference to the website which I seen done all the time on here. I do not want to offend anyone I was just trying to make people think for a change about what is important in life. Maybe if we all simply loved each other and really cared for each other this world would be a better place but everyone is too busy trying to point out any mistake someone makes even on here to give a ____. I had no intention in stealing anything it is articles anyone can read for free on the internet. Blessings to you all may your paths start to show love and light instead of judgment of others. ~Willow
  3. Willow Moonsidhe

    National Nurses Day: May 6th

    Yes they are =)
  4. Willow Moonsidhe

    National Nurses Day: May 6th

    Don't Forget National Nurses Day, also known as National RN Recognition Day, is always celebrated on May 6th and opens National Nurses Week. National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6th and ends on May 12th, the birth date of Florence Nightingale. ~Willow
  5. Willow Moonsidhe

    The Downward Spiral: Incivility in Nursing

    I am giving credit to the authors and the website. I feel especially reading some of the responses here that this is a much needed exploration into why these things are happening. Maybe it will help others to discuss it more in depth and the articles give ideals for dealing with it. Some of the responses have also helped me personally to look at solutions to help curb this type of behavior. Knowledge is power and never hurt anyone. Brightest Blessings Willow
  6. Willow Moonsidhe

    The Downward Spiral: Incivility in Nursing

    The Downward Spiral: Incivility in Nursing anifestations of the behaviors compel the reader to understand the context in which the information is being presented.http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/739328
  7. Willow Moonsidhe

    A Matter of Respect and Dignity: Bullying in the Nursing Profession

    Oh my gosh this sounds like what I went through this past year. I wish I had the clarity to do what that nurse did. I think the whole thing flustered me so much I did not know how to respond. I was going to add a tag about what do you do when the new manager is the bully but you summed up a good way to handle this. My Director actually sat with tears in her eyes trying to help me cope with the new manager but I thought if you feel so much for me why do you let her get by with it. My answer was to leave and just move on somewhere else with my career even though I had kept a notebook with all the facts to protect myself. I did not know you could call in a lawyer to straighten things out. I felt like the manager was almost purely evil she would even make up things that did not happen to write me up. Thanks so much for sharing this and hopefully I will not run into this situation again but if I do I will remember this. ~Willow
  8. Willow Moonsidhe

    A Matter of Respect and Dignity: Bullying in the Nursing Profession

    I started as a nurse in 1984 and there was no bullying then. People were more interested in giving good quality care than the power struggle I see today. I wish we could move the calendar back to those days and let the new nurses see nursing the way it use to be. There was a lot of pride in becoming a RN and a lot of team work among the nurse. Now all I see is division oh she only has a LPN or AD degree; instead it should be good for you for becoming a nurse and a pat on the back. Today I see a lot of what I dealt with in home health some young new manager trying there best to show administration that they see all the errors by writing up things they don't even know what they are writing about. I actually got wrote up by one of the rudest Clinical Managers I had ever seen in my whole career. The write up was for poor customer service for not getting the order form correct on a bed attachment that holds a warming blanket machine. This same patient I had taken my lunch break to go by the home and help get the lady in the car for an appointment so the daughter did not have to pay $400 for an ambulance ride and I also bought the same lady a contour cloud pillow for Christmas because she needed it for neck pain but could not afford it. But as we all have known before you get written up sometimes so someone with an inferior view of themselves can look good in managements eyes. It is so sad. It was the first time short of one medication error I had ever been written up since 1984. I had a crush injury in my foot and was out of nursing a few years until 10/2009. Since then I have been through 5 jobs looking for one with people who really care about the patients and want to work as a team. That is a sad statement of nursing today. Blessings to you all on this board who care enough to try and make a difference by posting care and concerns here. Love ~Willow
  9. Willow Moonsidhe

    Appalled at LTC standards of nursing care

    Ok started new job today and they staff nights with 1 nurse to 30 patients a much better ratio than 60 to 80 per nurse for sure. =)
  10. A Matter of Respect and Dignity: Bullying in the Nursing Profession Laura A. Stokowski, RN, MS Authors and Disclosures
  11. Minimum Nurse Staffing Ratios for Nursing Homes Ning Jackie Zhang; Lynn Unruh; Rong Liu; Thomas T.H. Wan Authors and Disclosures Posted: 05/19/2006; Nurs Econ. 2006;24(2):78-85, 93. © 2006 Jannetti Publications, Inc. Information from Industry Advanced degree open doors for working nurse Listen to one nurse’s powerful story of achievement after earning an advanced nursing degree. . Watch her inspirational video Introduction http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/531036
  12. Willow Moonsidhe

    Mistakes Common in U.S. Hospitals

    Mistakes Common in U.S. Hospitals By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters Health) Apr 07 - About one in three people in the United States will encounter some kind of mistake during a hospital stay, U.S. researchers said on Thursday. The finding, which is based on a new tool for measuring hospital errors, is about 10 times higher than estimates using older methods, suggesting much work remains in efforts to improve health quality. "Without doubt, we've seen improvements in health care over the past decade, and even pockets of excellence, but overall progress has been agonizingly slow," said Susan Dentzer, editor-in-chief of Health Affairs, which published several studies in a special April issue on patient safety. The special issue came 10 years after an influential Institute of Medicine report that found significant gaps in health quality. "It's clear that we still have a great deal of work to do in order to achieve a health care system that is consistently high-quality -- that is, safe, effective, patient-centered, efficient, timely, and devoid of disparities based on race or ethnicity," Dentzer said. Medical errors can range from bedsores to objects left in the body after surgery to life-threatening staphylococcal infections. A study by Dr. David Classen of the University of Utah and colleagues compared a new quality yardstick developed at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement in Massachusetts, with two common older methods of detecting errors -- reports of errors voluntarily included in the medical record and an older method for assessing errors developed by the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, or AHR. "A key challenge has been agreeing on a yardstick for measuring the safety of care in hospitals," the researchers wrote. To find the best yardstick, the team tested three methods of tracking errors on the same set of medical records from three different hospitals. Among the 795 patient records reviewed, voluntary reporting detected four problems, the Agency for Healthcare Research's quality indicator found 35, and the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's tool detected 354 events -- 10 times more than AHR's method. "Our findings indicate that two methods commonly used by most care delivery organizations and supported by policy makers to measure the safety of care ... fail to detect more than 90% of the adverse events that occur among hospitalized patients," the team wrote. The findings suggest there may be many errors that go undetected. In a separate study in the same issue, a team led by Dr. Jill Van Den Bos and colleagues at the Denver Health practice of the Milliman Inc consulting firm, used insurance claims to estimate the annual cost of medical errors that harm patients to be $17.1 billion in 2008 dollars. They found that 10 types of errors accounted for more than two-thirds of the total cost, with the most common ones being pressure ulcers or bedsores, postoperative infections and persistent back pain following back surgery. The researchers recommended that those three types of errors receive top priority for intervention and improvement. Both studies were supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which focuses on U.S. healthcare issues. SOURCES: http://bit.ly/ftoNg3 http://bit.ly/gvMTlm Health Affairs 2011. http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/740479?src=mp&spon=24
  13. Willow Moonsidhe

    Should Nurses Blow the Whistle?

    Yes I did it anonymously at http://oig.hhs.gov/fraud/hotline/ This is CMS fraud page.
  14. Willow Moonsidhe

    Should Nurses Blow the Whistle?

    I blew the whistle on that job I quit after one night. In truth though I have seen more unethical things than I ever would have dreamed of since I came back as a Registered Nurse from disability. Nurses charting crap they did not do and things they did not teach. It is awful but I know why it happens. There is not enough hours in the day to do the things expected of them. It is such a different world with so many different expectations of workers. The reason I blew the whistle on the nursing home is that it was totally unsafe. LPNs came in from the other floors and did the skilled charting, but they did not even go in the rooms and look at the patients. ~Willow
  15. Willow Moonsidhe

    Should Nurses Blow the Whistle?

    Should Nurses Blow the Whistle? Jennifer LeClaire With the various corporate scandals of recent years, we've seen plenty of headlines about whistleblowers in the business world. Now, the nursing industry is bringing us its own front-page cases that could see more medical watchdogs come to the fore. Legal experts say the number of whistleblower cases in the healthcare field has been on the rise since 1999, when the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies reported that medical errors are the nation's leading cause of death and injury. "Nurses are becoming more vocal about concerns that healthcare organizations are using unlicensed assistant personnel and not employing enough nurses on a shift," says attorney LaTonia Denise Wright, RN, of the Healthcare Risk Aversion Group in Cincinnati. "This is a real concern, because these practices lead to medical errors." Nurses Speak Out Nurses are also blowing the whistle on questionable practices. Cindy Moore, RN, got vocal about the way Florida's Duval County Health Department diagnosed people with sexually transmitted diseases. She complained that health officials were not notifying infected people in a timely manner and was subsequently fired for her accusations. Likewise, Stephanie Hohman, RN, blew the whistle on the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) emergency room when she became concerned about patients' rights and possible abuse. Hohman was also fired. And psychiatric nurse Stacie Neldaughter, RN, was fired after reporting alleged misuse of shock therapy treatment at a Wisconsin hospital. Despite the career risks, healthcare attorneys say nurses have a responsibility to blow the whistle on such activity. "Everyone has a moral obligation to blow the whistle on unsafe practices," says attorney Joanne Sheehan of Friedman, Newman, Levy, Sheehan and Carolan in Fairfield, Connecticut. "A nurse may be disciplined by the state licensing board for participating in unsafe practices that can harm patients." Employer Retaliation While this is certainly true, Wright advises nurses to understand the potential backlash before speaking out. "You could be terminated, and even if you decide to file suit, it could be years before you get your job back-if you get your job back," she says. "The statutes are normally very narrowly worded, and they vary from state to state. It's not a decision that you should make lightly." More than 50 percent of workers who flagged incidents of unlawful conduct in 2002 were fired, according to a study by the National Whistleblower Center, a nonprofit educational advocacy organization dedicated to supporting employee whistleblowers. Many others said they faced unfair discipline. The protections are limited even where a whistleblower statute is applicable, since statutes of limitation often force employees to learn of their rights and file a complaint within 30 days of being fired or disciplined. Steve Lee, RN, says his career nose-dived after he blew the whistle on alleged unsafe practices at a Texas hospital. He has since launched Nurseprotect, a grassroots effort to support nurses who face retaliation for whistleblowing. "Don't blow the whistle unless you are willing to give up your career for it," says Lee. "Whistleblower laws are symbolic and largely ineffective." While many agree with Lee, more nurses are finding protections and remedies under new state whistleblower laws, say experts, especially since the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act came on the scene with federal provisions built in. Mixed Outcomes In August 2003, a jury decided that the Duval County Health Department fired Moore in retaliation for making accusations about unsafe departmental procedures. The two sides settled and Moore got her job back. Hohman won her four-year battle against UTMB when a jury ruled that the facility retaliated against her for whistleblowing. The jury also awarded her wages and damages totaling $500,000. But in Neldaughter's case, even though the Wisconsin Coalition for Advocacy found that her hospital's procedures for obtaining informed consent for shock therapy were coercive, she did not get her job back after taking court action. "If you are thinking about blowing the whistle, then you need to make sure you are protected by whistleblower statutes," advises Wright. "If not, then address it through your management or through your union. Court battles could take years to resolve and winning is not automatic." This article was originally published on Monster.com. http://nursinglink.monster.com/benefits/articles/6515-should-nurses-blow-the-whistle?page=3&utm_content=nl_c1_20110419_whistleblower&utm_source=nlet
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