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Mkiwi

Mkiwi

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Mkiwi's Latest Activity

  1. Mkiwi

    High cost of nursing courses

    Thank you, that's good to know! I'll post another question about that, I think, just to find out what others have experienced:) Argh, it's a minefield!
  2. Mkiwi

    High cost of nursing courses

    Thanks. Also useful to know! I agree with you on protecting your investment. I'd hate to think what happens to your qualification if your school does lose accreditation, yikes.
  3. Mkiwi

    High cost of nursing courses

    Thank you for your reply. That's really useful, especially about the credit hours. Since you pay by the credit hour I realise that means more money, let alone more topics to cover so I'm really glad to know that. I am really leaning toward an accelerated BSN now, especially because I think it will be more transferable if I go abroad again. I have an Associate's degree in another subject and people never really seem to know what it is. It often gets officially translated as a lower qualification equivalent than it is. Although I'd have the RN status to go with it, I think the BSN will be the most universally understood. Has anyone here done a course that their employer paid for? How does that work? Do you work part-time and study part-time or do they give you leave to study full-time usually?
  4. Mkiwi

    High cost of nursing courses

    I understand that now but did not understand that before as I thought you would have to get through a BSN before you could become an RN. But, as I mentioned in a previous post, I see now that it is about the test, not about the course. There are two grades of nurses here in NZ, one has a post grad diploma, which is the same as an Associates degree in US parlance, and one has the BSc. The first one does not become an RN (I can't remember the name they use offhand but I think it is "enrolled nurse"). You need to do the BSc (BSN) in order to become an RN. Both can work as nurses, but they have different responsibilities. So, I was thinking the ADN vs. BDN thing in the US was something like that. I am still a little confused as to why there are different courses, however. For example, why would anyone spend 4 years on a BSN when you can still pass the NCLEX and get the same result after a 1-2 year Associate's degree? I see one of the differences is that some do not hire ADN graduates...why is that? Do those with an ADN usually get fewer duties or something? Or is it a state-by-state preference?
  5. Mkiwi

    High cost of nursing courses

    For a start I have to say that you guys are awesome, to use a word that is overused here in New Zealand, because I feel like I at least have a starting point to clear through all the mud I've been swimming in as far as nursing courses are concerned. I am an American, went up to high school there, but then have lived abroad in the UK, some Asian countries and here in NZ ever since. All of my post-high school ed has been in the UK and NZ so a lot of the US system stuff is confusing. But I am thinking of coming back, 5 year old in tow, and would really like to become an RN. My limitations are such that I have been a student for M.A.N.Y. years and would like to get as far as I can with nursing, with as low a cost as I can (as I'm a solo parent), as soon as I can so that I can just get working and gaining experience. I want to be well qualified, of course, but I just can't afford to be out of the workforce for too long. A few things have been cleared up for me so tell me if I've got this right: ”RN” is not a result of doing a BSN, but a result of passing the NCLEX. So that means you can do an associates degree and become an RN so long as you can pass the test. A masters is not only unneccesary, but may even be limiting to future choices. Th quickest and easiest route would be an associates degree and then passing the NCLEX, but some may not hire ADNs. So, I'm thinking I need to do an accelerated BSN. It seems like they are 1.5-2 years long (although I guess i'd have prereq courses??) and I should come out quite employable. My second choice would be the ADN>employment>employer pays for BSN route, but I still end up doing more study years or, at least, taking a lot more time to get to the end product of being a fully fledged RN…do I not? My interest? Very likely paediatrics or educational nurse of some sort as I have been a teacher all of these years and I feel my skills would go nicely in there somewhere. But, hey, I might discover something completely new once I'm studying, and I'm open to that. Now I'm trying to figure out how to find community colleges that do these courses in the area of Southern California that my parents live in as that is probably where I will be living. I've found a few, but they are private and the cost per credit” thing drive me nuts! I just want to know a ballpark figure how much these courses will cost me. What do you think you all ended up spending? If you were having a, I shudder to say it…”mid-life” career change, what route would you go for?
  6. Hi all, This is my first post! I am a career changer who has an undergrad degree in Sociology and MA in Linguistics plus a postgrad teaching cert. I'm keen to do an accelerated course of the BSN>MSN variety so I can come out with a masters and also be a qualified RN (Hope I've got that right. I've just started researching this and it's all so confusing). I'd like to do the course in southern California and UCLA does the programme but it seems to be $50,000! Can that be correct? Am I looking in the right place for a course? Can I do it any cheaper, but not online as I want the hands-on experience? Many thanks :)
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