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RNathome2010

RNathome2010

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  1. RNathome2010

    How many days off are appropriate?

    I don't know of any pdn case where the nurse does not get ample downtime including paid meal breaks, even if they're not officially scheduled. Last minute cancellations do suck. But there's usually the chance to pick up more hours during another shift or at another assignment. As for the hours, if you don't need 40 hrs why hold then month to month instead of just scheduling for a stable number of fewer hours? My guess: by committing to being someone's 40hr/week 5-day nurse, you get flexibility to take any if those 5 days off and still get enough pay. Rather than bring held to, say, mon-Thursday -- what if something comes up Tuesday after all? Better tell the family you'll do all the days so you have a backup day.
  2. RNathome2010

    How many days off are appropriate?

    Why can't you compare this to other jobs, and other universal standards of work ethic? And if you don't need 40 hrs, why essentially "hold" 40 hrs / week with a stable schedule, while routinely working less? And I am not concerned with my coworkers private affairs. I'm questioning the standards in this industry.
  3. RNathome2010

    How many days off are appropriate?

    Wow. This is why I asked. First, I'm not crossing a line as one poster said by questioning this behavior. My hope was to understand what counts as per diem. Yes, the agency is allwoing it... they allow anything. We know this, and we're lying if we say otherwise. We're lucking if agencies have our backs, they definitely do not have the families' backs in most cases. I understand that many nurses enter home care because of this interpretation of flexibility. But that does not make it professional. In no other job would you be able to get away with just taking the equivalent of weeks and weeks off of work, while an employer holds your position for you. We know that if we take a summer off, or a medical leave, that we could lose our position. Why then is it ok to take that same number of days off spread throughout the year? Answer: Because we know that probably the family will put up with it. I agree with trachmom, the reason nurses and agencies get away with this is because the customer, the families, are that needy. Something to think about. I also have to say that most of the nurses I've worked with do NOT think they can just take days off every month, when they're working stable shifts. We take pride in our job, we recognize that we've been asked to perform a very important job, for people who are suffering (patients AND their families). There seems to be a great split between PDN nurses (and agencies) as to what is counts as professional. And I'm not sure where all of this venting about being forced to cover shifts for other nurses is coming in, or being forced to work and take not time off. I didn't argue for that, and either has any family I've worked for. Just looking for basic, minimum professionalism.
  4. RNathome2010

    How many days off are appropriate?

    I guess my question is, if you commit yourself to work 9-5 M-F didn't you already chose your schedule? That's not per diem, it's s commitment. Right now, one nurse is on track to take the equivalent of 6 weeks off this year, mostly in random days 2-3 times a month. The issue isn't whether the patient will be safe in her absence. It's whether the mom can work her part time job , keep doc appts, etc. with a schedule that is only reliable 80% of the time. Finding coverage for multiple random shifts every month seems like a lot to ask especially when there are 3 other nurses in the house who also need to take time. And since there are no back up nurses tho the agency has looked for a long time (complex case). I'm not saying don't take time. Just that if you had 3 weeks of vacation at another job, you'd still only have 1.25 days/month. And common curtesy would be to check with your place of work to make sure that your desired days work. There's good reason for this, you're part of a team.
  5. RNathome2010

    How many days off are appropriate?

    Hi, I'm wondering how other PDNs with regular full-time assignments schedule time off? I've pretty much followed the standards of regular office work -- 3-5 sick days/year, and 2-3 weeks worth of vacation or personal days, scheduled in advance and in after discussing w/the family. I haven't had any problems with this, and only rarely need to negotiate a day off. But other nurses I've worked with think nothing of taking 2-3 shfits off each month, and often that's not even scheduled. This is very stressful for the family, and it puts more pressure on the other nurses in the home. The agency just says, well their per diem so we can't do anything. I guess I don't think of this as per diem work. I commited to a schedule, and it's my job to do the work. No, I don't benefits, yes I wish I did. But I don't think it's fair to take that out on the family. I get other perks from this job, and I chose it. Am I being too conservative? How do you all deal with time off?
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