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rn_wee

rn_wee

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  1. Off topic, but is there a certain amount of time you have to work in the unit you're hired before you can transfer to another unit within the Henry Ford Health System?
  2. rn_wee

    ICU RN let go after 3 months

    Learning21 , sorry you had to go through that. I felt the same way as you, I too didn't tell only but a few people. I'd think that with 6 years experience you shouldn't have any difficulty finding another job or even going back to what you did before. I wanted to wait a little before applying for jobs, but the sooner you go back to work the better (at least it was for me). This may seem like a set back, but it's probably for the best. You would think that there would be a better way than to let you go in the middle of the day. Just wondering if you got any warnings for your work performance. I did, my manager was vague saying that "I needed some more support" handed me a sheet, which had a checklist of tasks she wanted me to fill out throughout the day like having my plan of care/head to toe assessment done before 10am. Looking back, I didn't harm anyone, I had no medication errors. I believe that when I was let go there was no other reason than personality differences. I didn't have much in common with many people at work, so I didn't know what to talk about with them. I wanted to just go to work and do just what I thought I was hired for - to work - not to try to make friends. If there is one thing I did learn, it's important to quickly assess how cliquey the unit is that you are working in. If it is really cliquey, than some how you need to find a way into the group. Talk about things you aren't interested in, do what ever you have to do, stick it out, put your time in (to at least make it long enough to get another job) than get the **** out of there. You might be questioning yourself right now, don't, the sooner you get back to working the better it gets.
  3. rn_wee

    ICU RN let go after 3 months

    A second interview? Geez, sounds like a prestigious hospital and or nursing position. Don't know many places that require a second interview. Yah, hopefully you will get a position that you like and is a good fit. It's difficult to tell how well a interview went. Sometimes it may be they have already selected the candidate, but have to interview a certain amount of people for some HR policy the institution has. I know one thing for sure after having a few interviews, is everybody asks the same questions. How important is customer service? Give me an example of when you went above and beyond to provide customer service. What is your greatest strength? What is you greatest weakness? Give an example of when yourself and a coworker has a disagreement and describe what happened to resolve that disagreement. Why should we select you out of all the other candidates for this position? Funny thing is when I had my interview for my previous ICU position, it was one on one with the manager of the unit, lasted less than 30 minutes, then I went on the unit for a while to see what it was like. That's it. My other interviews (for med/surg and tele units) have had two or more people asking all the awkward interview questions with a duration of at least an hour or more. Then a tour of the unit. One of the better questions I had was from a one of the senior nurses that was invited in on the interview that works on a med/surg unit she asked "What would you do if somebody needed to go to the bathroom but couldn't get out of bed?" I had sort of a confused look on my face as I thought it was maybe a trick question, but replied "I would put them on the bedpan." I guess she was trying to see if I was going to ask for a nurse aid to do it because she explained that a lot of nurses ask the nurse aid to do that even when the RN can easily do it them self. I took the contingent offer and gave myself a few weeks before my start date in hopes that I can find something with benefits before that. I know the pay is on the low side considering the hospital is a trauma 1 center in a major metropolitan city, and also is a good drive from my house. Not to sound pompous, but hey, if they want to keep the nurse retention saga going, I'm going to contribute to it. Pay nurses right, give us reasonable acuity ratios (I think there ought to be a country or at least per state patient ratio based on a easy to follow formula based off acuity) and compensate loyal nurses. From what I have already have heard from nurses who stay at their position for many years (like 8 or more years) is that they get paid a lot less per hour then someone who jumps around every year to a different hospital. Unless you work in an area you absolutely love. Whats the point in keeping a job other than getting your check to pay off the bills. And yes you are making a difference by helping other people and that feels great, but in what nursing job would you not be making a difference?
  4. rn_wee

    ICU RN let go after 3 months

    taramb7263 just curious if you landed a job yet and hopefully in the area you wanted to get in. I got an offer today for a contingent position on a m/s unit. Got offered 24.50/hr seems low for not getting any benefits. Am I out of question thinking the pay should be in the 30/hr range? Anyways, I got a few interviews next week, and waiting to hear back from a previous interview.
  5. Got a question. Got a job offer today for a contingent staff RN position on a m/s unit. I was under the impression that contingent paid better because you have no benefits. However I was offered 24.50/hr. Is this reasonable? I was thinking of something in the range of 30 to 37/hr. The HR person who offered the position said "yah we used to pay contingent more 10 years ago, not so today"... I don't know, sort of sounded shady to me. Anyways I am going to call HR tomorrow to tell them when I can start. Would it be out of the question to ask for more money?
  6. rn_wee

    ICU RN let go after 3 months

    Thanks everybody, it's extremely encouraging to see the replies. I got an interview at another hospital 4 days after being let go. It is closer to my residence although, it isn't a Trauma 1 center or a ICU (its a tele job only 2 days a week). If I get offered the job, I'm going to take it. The reason I told them at the interview, about only working 3 months at my previous job, was that Neuro wasn't my first choice, and that it was the first interview/job offer I got. As simple as that, didn't elaborate any further as no more questions were asked about it. I may have an advantage as I do have one year experience on a telemetry unit as a LPN, its hard to predict interviews, but I think it went well. Now my thinking has shifted from working ICU to working part time on a med/surg telemetry unit, and picking up a couple of contingent positions. Reason being, if needed I could work up to 60 hours a week (to help pay off student loans) or just work my part time job 2 days a week and take a nice vacation/break to help preserve sanity. I know someday I will be back in the ICU, and I will continue to study and learn, but for now I think what happened may have been a gift in disguise.
  7. rn_wee

    ICU RN let go after 3 months

    Worked at a Level 1 Trauma Center, great learning experience. Floor orientation lasted 11 weeks total. 7 weeks working 2 twelve hour shifts/week on the floor and the rest of the 80 hour pay period being in the classroom. After finishing the class work, I worked 4 weeks on the floor working 3 12's/week. My whole goal going in was to try to soak up as much as I could from my experience as possible, when on the floor I used a notebook to write down important notes about the unit. Always studied at home after work as I am single and had the time to do it so I would know the pathophysiology and fill the gaps of when I had questions medications, procedures, or conditions. I had it down so well I was able to draw the circulation of blood from the aortic arch to all the cerebral arteries where strokes were common (not too hard). Got to know and continued learning the different types of aneurysms, procedures, how they were done, I learned so much everyday... I always tried to help other people when asked. However, I didn't get along with and tried to get along with my preceptor but personality wise we were just different. I asked a lot of questions as I am new, but with every question my preceptor always asked "why/what do think is going on?" so I would be in the middle of trying to figure out multiple drips for a patient and ask for tips on how to hook them up and get the "how do think they should be hooked up?" question back for example. I wouldn't know and eventually my preceptor would help me after trying to figure out how while family members of the patient in the room watched me struggle to figure it out. Looking back I should have asked for a different preceptor. Anyways, towards the end of my probationary period, I asked my preceptor how I was doing, and got the answer that I would be on my own in a couple of weeks. Then come to find out, my last day of my probation period, my preceptor didn't show up, called in "sick". Later in the day, I was called to the unit managers office to be notified that I wasn't a good fit for the unit. Much to my bewilderment, the main reason cited is that I didn't understand the pathophysiology and conditions well enough. I was so shocked at the moment and was basically speechless and didn't see any use in arguing with my manager about it considering that whose word would my manager take someone who has worked for 8 plus years or someone who worked for 11 weeks? However, I was referred to another unit within the hospital, but I still want to be in an icu and my manager said that I couldn't use them as a reference to get in another icu. Long rant, but would I be crazy to apply to an icu at another hospital and how do I sell my story?
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