Jump to content

Your most bonehead moment in nursing. Or 2. Or 3.

Nurses   (7,446 Views 79 Comments)

FolksBtrippin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

2 Followers; 14,207 Profile Views; 1,620 Posts

You are reading page 7 of Your most bonehead moment in nursing. Or 2. Or 3.. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

no.intervention.required has 5 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in stroke and cardiac nursing.

180 Posts; 4,517 Profile Views

Broke off the pleurx bottle, and the tip was left inside the connecting point.. hate those things ever since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

15 Followers; 1 Article; 6,341 Posts; 77,864 Profile Views

On 8/7/2019 at 5:54 AM, kbrn2002 said:

I did that not long ago with tube feeding. Spiked the bag of formula, primed the pump, took the cap off the tubing, turned it on. Only problem was I kind of forgot to actually attach it to the resident. That stuff is sticky!  Housekeeping was not impressed.

Housekeeping at Wrongway would have refused to clean up the mess because they don't clean up "body fluids".

"Hey! It's a fluid that goes into the body ain't it?!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

15 Followers; 1 Article; 6,341 Posts; 77,864 Profile Views

On 8/7/2019 at 10:39 PM, Crash_Cart said:

I once thought about describing a pt's bowel movement in the progress notes as, "BM appears consistent with the chili they are serving for lunch in the cafeteria today." 

 

Hilarious, Crash!

A few years ago, an NP questioned me on the consistency of a patient's diarrhea:

chunky.jpg.adaa815a2d72d0602d3051a199f994df.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

15 Followers; 1 Article; 6,341 Posts; 77,864 Profile Views

On 8/9/2019 at 10:35 PM, ThePsychWhisperer said:

 - During nursing school prior to reading the chart, I told a double AKA to "hop out of bed," so I could change his linens.

Several years ago, "Capt Ron" was a patient on the men's psych unit and I believed him to be evil incarnate. I had a difficult time remaining professional with him because I really wanted to inflict the same sort of pain on him that he inflicted on others.

I felt some degree of satisfaction when a threat Cat Ron made toward me ended up getting him sent to the state facility!

Some years later, I caught word that Capt Ron was going to be admitted to geriatric psych and I dreaded doing the admission. However, Capt Ron was subdued and in a w/c, unable to ambulate, due to paralysis resulting from a s/p spinal infection.

As he sat in his w/c and I was doing the admission, I asked Capt Ron how tall he was. He looked back at the handles on the w/c and flatly said, "Right now, about four feet".

I had difficulty suppressing a laugh and Capt Ron smiled at me.

During the assessment, I noted, among other things, that Capt Ron suffered from traumatic hypospadias which he informed me had occurred from a long term urinary catheter placement as he was fighting the spinal infection.

One night, later on, while Capt Ron and I were chatting, he asked me, "Have you seen my evil twin? I heard he had been a patient her some years back". We then talked about his previous admission, the accident which cause his spinal injury, what he had been through during its treatment, and how he saw his life from a totally different perspective now.

I told Capt Ron that he embodied an extremely rare occurrence: He had a change of consciousness, an epiphany, due to a revelation resulting from him dealing with his trials and tribulations; he truly was a changed man.

It was a very touching moment, I believe, for the both of us.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

spotangel is a MSN, RN and specializes in ED,Tele,Med surg, ADN,outpatient,homecare,LTC,Peds.

25 Articles; 244 Posts; 33,015 Profile Views

The ER was very busy with an unusual amount of pediatric patients, a few of them wailing infants. As I focused on getting a line into an old lady with spider veins, she whispered "Nurse Annie, check your scrubs". I look down to see 2 big wet patches. I had started to leak with the "let down effect" listening to all those infants crying! I felt like diary queen, smelt of milk and was mortified! Luckily I kept extra scrubs in my locker----!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

272 Posts; 6,198 Profile Views

I removed the spike from an IV bag that was half full, while it was still hanging. I had been acting pretty cool and know it all until that point. I had an unintended shower. 

I helped a postpartum patient to the toilet. I bent down to remove her old, super blood saturated pad. I’m still not certain what happened, but the pad flipped, spraying blood everywhere. I had new bloody freckles on my face, in my hair, and a little on my lips. Ugh!

Much to the relief of my patient, I came in to remove her IV heplock. I’m such a cool, competent nurse. I’m sure she was impressed. Fifteen minutes later, I walked in to deliver her last dose of IV antibiotics. Yes, IV antibiotics. I am a little forgetful sometimes. She had such a laugh. Thank goodness her physician (my cousin by some odd coincidence) said I could d/c the meds as she was sufficiently covered. Phew. The patient was very happy.

I could continue on for pages and pages, unfortunately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kitiger has 40 years experience as a RN and specializes in Pediatrics.

1 Follower; 918 Posts; 18,637 Profile Views

It was the end of a long, weary shift (I work private duty homecare, pediatrics). I noticed that my kiddo had hyperactive bowel sounds, not an unusual occurrence for him. I sat down to chart it, but this insistent niggling thought kept running through my head, "Are you sure?"

So . . . I grabbed the stethoscope and listened. Nope. He had normal bowel sounds.

. . . 😳 . . . :eek: . . . 🚾 . . . 💩

(I made it!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×