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You aren't imagining this . . . "RNs Are Delaying Retirement. . . "

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Specializes in NICU. Has 28 years experience.

MrChicagoRN, RN

Specializes in Leadership, Psych, HomeCare, Amb. Care. Has 30 years experience.

Actually, its 24% of nurses who were working at age 50, still working @ 69.

But your point is correct. Many nurses who would have retired 5 or more years ago, couldn't because of the recession. Or maybe they did retire, and returned when the economy crashed and are still rebuilding their retirement funds.

Sometime in the next 5-10 years their will be a large sucking sound as we boomers make a mass exodus.

TiffyRN, ADN, BSN, PhD

Specializes in NICU. Has 28 years experience.

Thank you for helping me read this better! I work with a couple of nurses who intended to retire 2-3 years ago but haven't been able to financially swing it.

Reminds me of a thread some time back in which an angry new grad (angry because he or she couldn't find a job) wanted to know why the Old Folk insisted on keeping jobs that should go to the Young 'Uns.

Mmmhmmm.

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 6 years experience.

Actually, its 24% of nurses who were working at age 50, still working @ 69.

But your point is correct. Many nurses who would have retired 5 or more years ago, couldn't because of the recession. Or maybe they did retire, and returned when the economy crashed and are still rebuilding their retirement funds.

Sometime in the next 5-10 years their will be a large sucking sound as we boomers make a mass exodus.

Depending upon the rate of the exodus, there may be a HUGE sucking sound leading to a massive hiring spree, or it could simply be a light hoovering and hiring will pick up a little but nothing super massive. I suspect that once the exodus takes hold and nobody can ignore it, hospitals that only hire BSNs will once again turn to hiring ADNs but with a provision that they get a BSN within a certain number of years. This isn't my attempt at prognostication, to me this is just good logic after seeing a couple nurse boom/bust cycles. I have no idea when this will occur... but at some point it must happen as these retirements will occur willingly or not because eventually nurses currently in the workforce will eventually become too old to work.

Depending upon the rate of the exodus, there may be a HUGE sucking sound leading to a massive hiring spree, or it could simply be a light hoovering and hiring will pick up a little but nothing super massive. I suspect that once the exodus takes hold and nobody can ignore it, hospitals that only hire BSNs will once again turn to hiring ADNs but with a provision that they get a BSN within a certain number of years. This isn't my attempt at prognostication, to me this is just good logic after seeing a couple nurse boom/bust cycles. I have no idea when this will occur... but at some point it must happen as these retirements will occur willingly or not because eventually nurses currently in the workforce will eventually become too old to work.

Will there be a "giant sucking sound"? Of course, because as you and others have said sooner or later even the tail end Baby Boomers (those born in the early 1960's) will leave the bedside if not retire from nursing all together. However which pool generates that vortex may be an open question.

In many markets inpatient beds are shrinking. This is either due to facilities closing and or simply reducing capacity by closing units and floors. The push from both federal and local governments is towards more outpatient/ambulatory/urgent care and less hospital admissions. Once you start to move away from the hospital based model 24/7 staffing is reduced or even eliminated for some units/floors.

The overall trend in all sectors of American business is to do more with less employees. That is to increase productivity using technology and so forth while not having a corresponding increase in labour costs. Places are becoming very efficient in how they staff and everything speaks to that trend only continuing. The trend in all sectors has been when older/experienced workers leave their positions are often "split" among other employees. That is others will pick up a larger work load instead of hiring a new employee to fill the position especially at the previous wage/benefit package.

The healthcare sector currently is one of the bright spots in the US economy in terms of hiring. However when you look closely at who is being hired last time one looked a good portion were UAPs/tech and administrative workers. That is interesting to me at least because it could indicate that facilities are moving towards using more aides and techs and not hiring a corresponding number of professional nurses.

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

Yeah, I read that article and some of the other comments the younger generation made, such as nurses being MANDATED to retire at 55!

Sounds like a brilliant idea. They can support me in my "elder" years, because I will expect the same pay as I sit on my geriatric butt. :roflmao:

T-Bird78

Has 6 years experience.

I worked with one nurse who was let go at age 74 after she'd been hospitalized and had used all her PTO and FMLA time. She passed away less than two years later from complications of a surgery related to that illness. Another nurse retired at 72, only to come back PRN for 2 more years.

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

I work with a nurse who works a .6 at age 73, on a med/surg unit, night shift!

applewhitern, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 30 years experience.

We have one that is nearing 80. Still going strong. I like to work and think it helps keep one's mind sharp. About the ADN comments, the whole point of the ADN in the first place was to get registered nurses into the workforce quicker, during a major nursing shortage. Once upon a time, it was actually harder to get into an ADN program, than it was to get into a BSN program. When the next shortage hits, the ADN will be welcomed with open arms.

tokmom, BSN, RN

Specializes in Certified Med/Surg tele, and other stuff. Has 30 years experience.

We have one that is nearing 80. Still going strong. I like to work and think it helps keep one's mind sharp. About the ADN comments, the whole point of the ADN in the first place was to get registered nurses into the workforce quicker, during a major nursing shortage. Once upon a time, it was actually harder to get into an ADN program, than it was to get into a BSN program. When the next shortage hits, the ADN will be welcomed with open arms.

Maybe, but if they do, I bet the caveat will be obtaining a BSN in a certain amount of years.

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 41 years experience.

Depending upon the rate of the exodus, there may be a HUGE sucking sound leading to a massive hiring spree, or it could simply be a light hoovering and hiring will pick up a little but nothing super massive. I suspect that once the exodus takes hold and nobody can ignore it, hospitals that only hire BSNs will once again turn to hiring ADNs but with a provision that they get a BSN within a certain number of years. This isn't my attempt at prognostication, to me this is just good logic after seeing a couple nurse boom/bust cycles. I have no idea when this will occur... but at some point it must happen as these retirements will occur willingly or not because eventually nurses currently in the workforce will eventually become too old to work.
I am hoping ofr my daughter's graduation from her BSN program year...LOL around 2018

Beautiful Mind RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Oncology, Epic CT.

Reminds me of a thread some time back in which an angry new grad (angry because he or she couldn't find a job) wanted to know why the Old Folk insisted on keeping jobs that should go to the Young 'Uns.

Mmmhmmm.

Really? Someone actually made a thread like that.

One word...."Wow". :no:

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 16 years experience.

Really? Someone actually made a thread like that.

One word...."Wow". :no:

Here's one: https://allnurses.com/nurse-colleague-patient/elderly-coworkers-becoming-851393.html

And this is a more likely contender: https://allnurses.com/nursing-student-assistance/retirement-nursing-field-814916.html

And this is probably the exact thread RNsRWe is thinking of: https://allnurses.com/nurse-colleague-patient/bitter-dried-up-579931.html

Unfortunately, it is a topic that comes up every so often and gets a bit contentious. However, with many older nurses having lost their retirement with the economic recession and the fact that the age for social security keeps getting pushed back, there are going to be many nurses working longer simply because they can't afford not to. That still doesn't mean they can't do the job- some can't, some can, but retirement is largely a decision left to the individual person.

akulahawkRN, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in Emergency Department. Has 6 years experience.

I am hoping for my daughter's graduation from her BSN program year...LOL around 2018

Hopefully it starts earlier than that so she'll be readily hired on. Got my fingers crossed for her!

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Reminds me of a thread some time back in which an angry new grad (angry because he or she couldn't find a job) wanted to know why the Old Folk insisted on keeping jobs that should go to the Young 'Uns.

Mmmhmmm.

There have been a number of threads like that. And one thread where the new grad had a job in the ER and couldn't get along with her co-workers so she said they should "all just retire already and get out of my way so I can rock the ER." Perhaps we Old Folk are being bullied! ;)

Oh'Ello, BSN, RN

Specializes in Heme Onc.

Oof..I Desperately hope for no "sucking sound". Would be the prime opportunity to "rework" and hire UAP's to fill RN positions again.

azhiker96, BSN, RN

Specializes in PACU. Has 10 years experience.

There could be several reasons why nurses are working longer. I intend to work until I'm 70 to maximize my social security check. With my family hx and diet and exercise I should be able to draw on that for at least two decades after retirement. Plus, working longer increases the pension I get from my employer.

I also enjoy the work and my coworkers so there is no real reason for me to retire early.