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Would you call in sick?

Nurses   (11,791 Views 81 Comments)
by AnnieOaklyRN AnnieOaklyRN (Member)

AnnieOaklyRN works as a RN, Paramedic.

3 Likes; 1 Follower; 33,685 Visitors; 2,577 Posts

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Newgradnurse17 has 2 years experience as a BSN.

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Well I disagree. You took this job knowing about your commute. You must of known about the lack of time between shifts. You've created this mess, now you have to deal with it. If I was your employer and I found out you were calling in sick because of the commute I would let you go immediately.

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NurseCard has 13 years experience as a ADN and works as a RN.

140 Likes; 3 Followers; 2 Articles; 34,926 Visitors; 2,844 Posts

That's a long, long, long commute.... I interviewed once for a job that I

really wanted, but it was going to be about an hour and fifteen minute

commute at least.. during the interview process I was considering renting

a small apartment, IF I got the job. I didn't.

I'd call in.

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a school nurse.

507 Likes; 10,901 Visitors; 1,060 Posts

Well I disagree. You took this job knowing about your commute. You must of known about the lack of time between shifts. You've created this mess, now you have to deal with it. If I was your employer and I found out you were calling in sick because of the commute I would let you go immediately.

Granted, but the immediate issue is if the OP is safe to: 1. do the commute and 2. practice. Regardless of the longer term issue, under the current circumstances do you think they should go into work?

I think the situation is not sustainable and yes, not fair to the workplace. You should resign as professionally as possible.

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AnnieOaklyRN works as a RN, Paramedic.

3 Likes; 1 Follower; 33,685 Visitors; 2,577 Posts

Well I disagree. You took this job knowing about your commute. You must of known about the lack of time between shifts. You've created this mess, now you have to deal with it. If I was your employer and I found out you were calling in sick because of the commute I would let you go immediately.

umm, this has nothing to do with the commute, and more to do with the fact that I got no sleep and it was unsafe for me to drive or care for patients! Nothing to do with my commute, I just literally couldn't fall asleep because I am not used to sleeping during the day, and flip flopping between days and nights certainly isn't helping. Also as an added bonus we had a meeting Thursday morning AFTER a 12 hour night shift and were forced to stay another hour and 15 minutes which is just ridiculous! Post the minutes, but don't make your night shift stay 13 plus hours!

Please read the entire original post before accusing me of not going to work because of my commute time!

Annie

Edited by AnnieOaklyRN

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AnnieOaklyRN works as a RN, Paramedic.

3 Likes; 1 Follower; 33,685 Visitors; 2,577 Posts

Just to clarify the actual physical commute driving, with little to no traffic is 50 minutes which is more then doable. The only time I get this is when its a saturday or sunday shift that starts at 7 am, otherwise its horrendous. I figured it wouldn't be nearly as bad as it is during the off shifts (11a-11p and 7p-7a) but it is unfortunately. I also try and take public transportation to avoid having to sit in the traffic, as I find it a little more relaxing, the problem is is that it takes 2-3 hours going that way. No easy solution

I have tried to work with the manager, as the traffic is a bit less during off shifts and it takes 1.5 -2 hours instead of more during those times, but she says she cannot do it. I was actually told could work 11a-11 pm during my interview once off orientation, and clearly that was missinformation. I was also told I would do a couple nights per a schedule (it is actually 6 plus a schedule), and that there would only be 2 or so call shifts per an entire schedule (there are usually 1 to 2 a week for each person!).

Just to reiterate my decision to leave is NOT just based on commute time, its the team dynamics and the job itself, and the schedule which they were not honestly about during my interview. Since I started 5 plus people have left, the team has very poor morale and it isn't getting any better anytime soon.

The city where this job is, is EXTREMELY EXPENSIVE, as in a 1 bedroom apartment in a slummy part of town cost about 2000.00 a month. A hotel room is 200.00 plus a night, so those are not options. I own a house in the woods and prefer that, and I would never live in any city! I have always wanted to work at this hospital, thus I accepted the job knowing that it may not work out, or it may end up being my dream job. It hasn't worked out, so I am looking for a new one. There are many people in this world who have taken jobs only to realize it was a big mistake... it happens!

Annie

Edited by AnnieOaklyRN

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

321 Likes; 3 Followers; 112,117 Visitors; 12,931 Posts

Can I get an honest answer why a one way 2+ hour commute seemed like a good idea? I am trying to understand why this is acceptable to some and how they rationalize that type of commute.

That was exactly my question. I wonder about the thought process behind accepting a job that is 2 hours away. Edited to add: NM, Just saw Annie's explanation above.

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AnnieOaklyRN works as a RN, Paramedic.

3 Likes; 1 Follower; 33,685 Visitors; 2,577 Posts

While you are looking for the new job is it possible for you to Cluster your nights together and get a cheap hotel room near work? The gas and possible tolls alone would probably pay for a hotel room right?

I would love this, but right now I am being precepted and am subject to my preceptor's preferences, which is to not have clustered nights. Also our team is so small it is hard for the scheduling person for what they want. I have tried to work with the manager as far as when I get off orientation and she has been unwilling. I was also told I could have permanent 11a-11p shift when I interviewed which was clearly not the truth!

Read my later post above, the physical commute is only 50 minutes, it's just that the traffic is just that bad at all hours. I have a hybrid so gas isn't a huge issue, especially since it switches to the electric motor when I am sitting in stop and go traffic. There are no tolls. Hotel rooms in this city start at 200.00 plus a night!

I have looked at many different options and they are all more expensive or worse then just driving in for each shift, or taking the bus. The only solution is to find a new job....

Annie

Edited by AnnieOaklyRN

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middleagednurse has 50+ years experience and works as a RN.

3 Likes; 10,129 Visitors; 550 Posts

While you are looking for the new job is it possible for you to Cluster your nights together and get a cheap hotel room near work? The gas and possible tolls alone would probably pay for a hotel room right?

Or an airbnb would be cheaper.

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19 Likes; 642 Visitors; 145 Posts

Or an airbnb would be cheaper.

Actually this ^^^ or Priceline. You can bid on Priceline for hotels around the area and you have control over what you're willing to pay. Worst case scenario is they don't take your bid. Best case is they do. There are different star ratings for the different hotels. Of course, don't expect to get a 3 star hotel for $20, but you can get some pretty decent deals on there. I certainly have.

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1,772 Likes; 4 Followers; 17,092 Visitors; 2,548 Posts

umm, this has nothing to do with the commute, and more to do with the fact that I got no sleep and it was unsafe for me to drive or care for patients! Nothing to do with my commute, I just literally couldn't fall asleep because I am not used to sleeping during the day, and flip flopping between days and nights certainly isn't helping. Also as an added bonus we had a meeting Thursday morning AFTER a 12 hour night shift and were forced to stay another hour and 15 minutes which is just ridiculous! Post the minutes, but don't make your night shift stay 13 plus hours!

Please read the entire original post before accusing me of not going to work because of my commute time!

Annie

To be fair Annie in your first post you did mention that your lack of sleep will be worsened by your long commute which made it sound like you felt you would be okay if the commute was shorter. I did a long commute (1hr 45 minutes each way). Frankly, it's not sustainable. If you think you're unsafe I would call off...this time. But until you find a new job you need to have a Plan B in place so this doesn't happen again. It seems to me your life is worth an occasional $200 although I suspect with a little investigating you would be able to find something cheaper. Sorry your dream job turned into a nightmare. Been there, done that!

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1,154 Likes; 7 Followers; 21,340 Visitors; 2,702 Posts

Well I disagree. You took this job knowing about your commute. You must of known about the lack of time between shifts. You've created this mess, now you have to deal with it. If I was your employer and I found out you were calling in sick because of the commute I would let you go immediately.

You disagree about what? You can disagree about whether the OP should have accepted the position, but that wasn't the question, and the immediate situation of what today (now yesterday) holds has to be dealt with separately. This discussion isn't about whether people should feel entitled to keep a job where they expect to be able to regularly not show up to work because they didn't want to make the commute they themselves chose. It would be a moot discussion anyway - since that is quite the self-limiting situation (termination would be rightfully forthcoming).

We do not put ourselves or patients at further risk just because of something we supposedly should of (sic) known, nor because we have made a choice that isn't working out (which we now know is for reasons not 100% due to the OP, and in fact involves at least some false pretenses on the employer's part). In any case, the OP is in the process of rectifying the situation, which was information initially available to readers.

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2 Likes; 4,225 Visitors; 325 Posts

Just to clarify the actual physical commute driving, with little to no traffic is 50 minutes which is more then doable.

If my math is correct, and only assuming the easy 50 minute commute and working a .6/8day per month schedule, that's still over 13 hours of driving per month. 32 hours and more of driving assuming working a .6 if considering that they are all the long commute of two hours. Driving is inherently dangerous, the more driving, the more chance of an accident. And you're trying to do it some of the time with little or no sleep. Eesh. You could pick up almost a full extra week of hours to work for a job closer to home.

Just to reiterate my decision to leave is NOT just based on commute time, its the team dynamics and the job itself, and the schedule which they were not honestly about during my interview. Since I started 5 plus people have left, the team has very poor morale and it isn't getting any better anytime soon.

Maybe it's because everyone is commuting 2+ hours per day? /s

The city where this job is, is EXTREMELY EXPENSIVE, as in a 1 bedroom apartment in a slummy part of town cost about 2000.00 a month. A hotel room is 200.00 plus a night, so those are not options. I own a house in the woods and prefer that, and I would never live in any city! I have always wanted to work at this hospital, thus I accepted the job knowing that it may not work out, or it may end up being my dream job. It hasn't worked out, so I am looking for a new one.

The only solution is to find a new job....

So I'm thinking your job has to be in one of four areas: CA, NY, IL or WA. TX?? I'm just curious.

There is another solution: move closer. Sure rents are more expensive, but the cost in maintenance of your vehicle and the cost of time would offset that price. What is your time worth to you? It's ok, we know that's not going to happen.

So my takeaway from your post only reconfirms my bias towards long commutes, and that is that they are absurd. No offense.

Edited by Accolay
Make the right decision: still call out.

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