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Worth it to go to Canada in order to graduate 4 months faster?

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by sixthwannabe sixthwannabe (New Member) New Member

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I am hold both American and Canadian citizenships. I got accepted to transfer into a top Canadian nursing BSN 2 year program and an American BSN 2 year program. However, the Canadian program graduates 4 months faster than the American program.

Ideally, I would like to graduate ASAP because I want to be streamlined into the BSN program.

However, it is really that beneficial to graduate faster? If I graduate nursing school in Canada, I will work in the US. However, if I go to school in Canada, then it will be that much more difficult to get into an American ICU position right out of nursing school?

Wouldn't the four months I save by going to an Canadian school be offset/negated by my having to spend time obtaining an American RN license anyways? I know how difficult it is to get into an ICU , let alone get into an ICU from a Canadian program!!

With the American school, there's a much better chance of getting into an ICU directly out of nursing school as they do externships with critical care units.

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17,783 Visitors; 1,840 Posts

I don't know the answers to your questions. I can only ask, when you look at the big picture, is 4 months out of your life really that big of a deal to stress over this much?

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5,131 Visitors; 474 Posts

I was just curious what city in Canada offers a 2 year Bsn?? I am Canadian but reside in the US. Many of my friends are RN's in Toronto. All the programs there are 4 years.

To answer your question. I don't think 4 months is worth all the hassle if you already reside here in the US.

Serena

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5,133 Visitors; 183 Posts

I was just curious what city in Canada offers a 2 year Bsn?? I am Canadian but reside in the US. Many of my friends are RN's in Toronto. All the programs there are 4 years.

To answer your question. I don't think 4 months is worth all the hassle if you already reside here in the US.

Serena

University of Toronto has only a 2-year second entry program, and York University (suburban Toronto) has both a traditional 4-year and a 2-year program. The one at York is only a couple of years old, so your friends may not have heard of it.

There are options in other cities as well, but I don't remember them off the top of my head.

I wouldn't make the 4 months a big factor in my decision - but tuition fees are likely to be lower in Canada. There were a few Americans in my program who came for lower fees, even though they didn't have dual citizenship and had to pay the significantly higher international student fees.

On the other hand, a Canadian school may not prepare you as well for the NCLEX, so you'd have to do a lot of self-study to work in the US. The Canadian licensing exam is a lot less scientific and more touchy-feely-bullcrappy, and from what I gather from the student threads on allnurses, our courses reflect that difference in emphasis.

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HeartsOpenWide is a RN and specializes in Ante-Intra-Postpartum, Post Gyne.

2 Articles; 26,415 Visitors; 2,889 Posts

Four months is not that long and not a guarantee you will even get a job within four months after graduating.

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5,366 Visitors; 621 Posts

is cost not a factor? anyways, i'd stick with a usa school if that's where you want to work.

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10,110 Visitors; 611 Posts

. The Canadian licensing exam is a lot less scientific and more touchy-feely-bullcrappy.

I'll take the touchy-feely comment...even the less scientific comment...but "bullcrappy?" Really?

Sheesh.

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7,154 Visitors; 460 Posts

I'll take the touchy-feely comment...even the less scientific comment...but "bullcrappy?" Really?

Sheesh.

In the spirit of international good will, and in deference to our esteemed neighbors to the north, I will apologize for my countryman's indiscretion.

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loriangel14 specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

1 Follower; 36,009 Visitors; 6,922 Posts

Maybe the OP had better stay in the US if that is what she thinks of Canada and our nursing exam.

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7,154 Visitors; 460 Posts

Maybe the OP had better stay in the US if that is what she thinks of Canada and our nursing exam.

Misinterpretations on both of our parts, the OP did not post the offending comment, and I assumed (apparently incorrectly) the comment was of U.S. origin.

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michigansapphire has 4 years experience.

5,218 Visitors; 133 Posts

Would you be able to sit the NCLEX in your preferred US state with a degree from a Canadian program? Doesn't the state board of nursing have to receive documentation of your education from your school? I would think a Canadian school would not be familiar with US state board procedures.

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5,133 Visitors; 183 Posts

Misinterpretations on both of our parts, the OP did not post the offending comment, and I assumed (apparently incorrectly) the comment was of U.S. origin.

Just to confirm... I am born, educated, and employed in Canada, so no need to worry about an international incident! And I only call my nursing program "bullcrappy" because stronger words aren't allowed on allnurses.

Cheers eh, Rhymeswithlibrarian

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