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Worried about hiring requirements..........

Nurses   (2,838 Views | 21 Replies)

10,021 Profile Views; 685 Posts

OK, here's my big issue. Do you guys think that within the next 3-4 years, it will be a requirement to be BSN, for the majority of hospitals to hire a nurse?

Will the ADN RN become the new LPN/LVN, so to speak?

I ask, because I want to ensure that I go for the right degree and don't want to get stuck without a BSN if that's what they will insist upon...I have to work after getting my RN.

What I'd LIKE to do, is get my ADN, them MSN. Within the next 2-3 years, do you see hospitals still hiring ADN's?

What do you think is the most likely outcome/scenario of this whole BSN requirement trend?

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4 Followers; 37,675 Posts; 102,975 Profile Views

The turnaround has not occurred in the last sixty years that it has been discussed and the idea bandied about, so I would not lose any sleep over it at this point. The wise thing to do is to get a BSN from the get go. Or do an RN to BSN program (online even) as soon in one's career as possible. No fuss, no muss.

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4,700 Posts; 38,360 Profile Views

I wouldn't lose sleep over this one.....Just get into a school and 2 step it (If needed IOW RN-BSN)......

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621 Posts; 5,541 Profile Views

adn's are here to stay, as long as, health care remains private (it's about profit, not care). we're a long way from nationalized health care (all health care workers working the the feds) no matter what the nuts say.

truthfully, a bsn is a waste of time is you're not going to get a higher degree and/or don't want to work in areas that generally required a bsn (which is generally government work and other areas).

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378 Posts; 4,734 Profile Views

I am applying to both programs although I would prefer the BSN program but if I get in an ADN program I will do that. I live in the Bay Area and you are lucky if you can get into ANY program at all. The Nursing dept at my school said that the RN-BSN program is not competitive at all, you are in once you have your RN.

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

7 Followers; 13,340 Posts; 60,519 Profile Views

It depends on where you live ... and what type of job you will want as a new grad. In some places and in some hospitals, it is currently the case that they hire very few ADN's for certain jobs. Other hospitals in other places hire ADN's all the time.

You will have to investigate the employers in YOUR area to answer that question.

What is the situation in your area?

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106 Posts; 2,606 Profile Views

It might happen here eventually, but it will take several years and it will be gradual. I know most Canadian provinces now require a BSN and their LPN's have similar education to American trained ADN's. I graduate in 2 days with my ADN, but I think all RN's should have their BSN. I hope to do the RN-BSN as soon as I can.

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fungez has 19 years experience.

364 Posts; 7,642 Profile Views

As an ASN I'd advise you to get your BSN immediately or as soon as possible. Not because ASN is not as good (I actually prefer ASN students as they tend to be older and more motivated) but because it is more marketable and needed for advancement. Trust me, you won't want to do bedside forever. And, all things being equal, wouldn't you prefer a four year degree employee over a 2 year? Just be warned, some schools will try and jerk you around if you wait too long to get your BSN. I called the local college about getting certified in transcription, and they wanted me to retake A and P and medical terminology, of all things. Even after I explained that I've been an RN for almost 20 years they just kept saying "if it's been more than 4 years since since you took A and P, you will have to retake it." I told them they were smokin' crack and that was the end of that conversation. Oh, well, I don't type that great, anyway. Anyway, getting a BSN can only help you, so just bite the bullet and do it. Good luck to you.

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11,191 Posts; 54,435 Profile Views

whether folks want to acknowledge it or not, more employers are desiring a bsn, with some even requiring it.

as ilg suggested, research your regional requirements but the trend is definitely headed towards bsn.

leslie

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26 Posts; 1,147 Profile Views

I had the same questions going in..this is the way I handled it. I got my prereqs at a community college that offers an ASN program and a good bridge program to another school that offers a BSN. I looked at what classes that both programs have in common and started off in those. Then I applied for the ASN program (very competitive) I figured if I didnt get in I could take the summer and another semester to get the extra classes I need for the BSN program and apply there. Really you will find that with prereqs an ASN degree takes about 3yrs and a BSN 4yrs really not a big difference when you think about it. I decided just to go for BSN, you never know what is going to happen in the future job market and this is an extra security. Also I had put this time aside to go to school so I might as well get it all done!

Hope this helps!

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685 Posts; 10,021 Profile Views

I had the same questions going in..this is the way I handled it. I got my prereqs at a community college that offers an ASN program and a good bridge program to another school that offers a BSN. I looked at what classes that both programs have in common and started off in those. Then I applied for the ASN program (very competitive) I figured if I didnt get in I could take the summer and another semester to get the extra classes I need for the BSN program and apply there. Really you will find that with prereqs an ASN degree takes about 3yrs and a BSN 4yrs really not a big difference when you think about it. I decided just to go for BSN, you never know what is going to happen in the future job market and this is an extra security. Also I had put this time aside to go to school so I might as well get it all done!

Hope this helps!

Thanks for all the replies, you guys! Yes, I was considering going for the U of A program in Tucson for the BSN. But then again, what do y'all think of RN to MSN? Is it significantly more expensive than RN to BSN?

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4 Followers; 37,675 Posts; 102,975 Profile Views

Your last question would depend upon the program you are considering. You will have to do some investigation of various programs to see what their costs are and keep in mind that costs increase as time passes.

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