Jump to content
2019 Nursing Salary Survey Read more... ×

Working on More than One Floor?

First Year   (1,868 Views 20 Comments)
by GentheRN GentheRN, ASN, RN (Member)

GentheRN has <1 years experience as a ASN, RN.

455 Visitors; 17 Posts

advertisement

You are reading page 2 of Working on More than One Floor?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

122 Visitors; 6 Posts

While not separate jobs, at least in my hospital, any nurse off of orientation (6 months for ICU, 4 months for everywhere else) is able to pick up in any unit within their specialty across the entire system. The system comprises of many hospitals, including a level 3 trauma and a level 1 trauma/teaching hospital. Also, if you are an ICU nurse, you can pick up in ANY ICU, as long as the manager on that unit is willing to approve your shift. So, if you are trained in CVICU as a new grad, you can still pick up extra shifts in Trauma ICU or Neuro ICU. The same is true across Med/Surg-- cardiac tele nurses can pick up on a post-surgical floor and vice versa.

Not quite a different job, but there are plenty of opportunities to learn from other units. I have also always been approved for over-time in my hospital. If a unit really needs help that week, they will pay you overtime to work their. As a result, I have been able to float to tons of different units across multiple hospitals and learn a lot along the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GentheRN has <1 years experience as a ASN, RN.

455 Visitors; 17 Posts

While not separate jobs, at least in my hospital, any nurse off of orientation (6 months for ICU, 4 months for everywhere else) is able to pick up in any unit within their specialty across the entire system. The system comprises of many hospitals, including a level 3 trauma and a level 1 trauma/teaching hospital. Also, if you are an ICU nurse, you can pick up in ANY ICU, as long as the manager on that unit is willing to approve your shift. So, if you are trained in CVICU as a new grad, you can still pick up extra shifts in Trauma ICU or Neuro ICU. The same is true across Med/Surg-- cardiac tele nurses can pick up on a post-surgical floor and vice versa.

Not quite a different job, but there are plenty of opportunities to learn from other units. I have also always been approved for over-time in my hospital. If a unit really needs help that week, they will pay you overtime to work their. As a result, I have been able to float to tons of different units across multiple hospitals and learn a lot along the way.

Someday, floating sounds like it will be a great experience. Sounds like you've had a lot of great opportunity :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

xoemmylouox has 13 years experience and works as a Nurse.

39 Likes; 1 Follower; 38,229 Visitors; 3,145 Posts

I'm a float nurse. Some say it isn't wise for new grads to be floats, but I feel like depending on your strengths, it is a great opportunity to see and learn things in a fast paced, intense, way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GentheRN has <1 years experience as a ASN, RN.

455 Visitors; 17 Posts

I'm a float nurse. Some say it isn't wise for new grads to be floats, but I feel like depending on your strengths, it is a great opportunity to see and learn things in a fast paced, intense, way.

It does sound like an excellent learning experience, I will keep my mind open if that kind of opportunity presents itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

zoidberg has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN.

13 Likes; 6,391 Visitors; 243 Posts

I started on a med surg floor (mostly surgical). 4 months in and started working OT, and saw a lot, and now work in the med surg float pool full time. i have to do 3 12's, but can do 5 shifts in a week if i want. I get sent to any of the hospital's 20 adult med surg floors or ER/PACU (caring boarders waiting for beds). i love it. as previous people said, find out how your hospital utilizes you in OT, and make the most of it! floor nursing is great in that I can pick up what i want to earn some extra cash to pay for whatever. not all jobs have that flexibility. and float pool nursing is generally well compensated :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ventmommy works as a Respiratory Therapist.

8 Likes; 9,951 Visitors; 378 Posts

I can't imagine any hospital that would allow this because your PRN work would constantly be pushing you into overtime.

More importantly to your wallet, all that OT would push you into a higher tax bracket so all those extra hours yield not so much extra in your paychecks. I have a FT job at one hospital and a PRN job at another. I usually get at least one call shift per week at the FT job and work 1 or 2 days at the PRN job. That is the best way to maximize income.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
advertisement

46 Likes; 1 Article; 15,961 Visitors; 950 Posts

If you eventually want to pick up predictable extra hours, your best bet is to get a PRN position at a different hospital (as a few other previous posters have stated).

However, if you only want to work the very occasional extra shift, you can see about being put on the text lists for the floors that you're qualified to float to. Usually, if a unit is short for the upcoming shift, they'll start sending out texts or emails earlier in the day. Picking up an extra shift would put you into overtime, but if the unit is desperate enough to be sending out texts at the last minute then they'd almost certainly approve the overtime. Once you get more experience in your current unit and are eligible to float, you could see what units you feel comfotable floating to and ask their managers (as well as yours, since it may affect the whether or not you go into OT on your unit, depending on your hospital policies).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Luckyyou has 7 years experience and works as a RN, CCRN.

2 Likes; 15,714 Visitors; 446 Posts

I do this. I work my regular 3 shifts a week and then pick up extra in my old role at our sister hospital. My current unit pays for my three shifts, and the other unit pays for my hours worked there, plus the bonus and overtime for those shifts. They need qualified people for the equipment I'm certified on, so they happily pay the premium pay to be staffed appropriately. It hasn't been an issue and my full time manager is supportive in letting me help out in my old role.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×