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Working with a fracture

Nurses   (1,475 Views | 18 Replies)

Cgritz77 has 6 years experience as a RN.

683 Profile Views; 32 Posts

This might be a dumb question, but do any nurses out there have any experience working while you've had an injury? I fracture my right ankle, which is my dominant side, and I'm currently looking for employment. I know this will take months to heal, and I need surgery next week. I am currently in a splint and may be in a cast or boot after surgery. I know most working environments are obviously not suitable for this, but was wondering if anyone knows any that are? I hate to think I will have to wait months to get employment. Please let me know.

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JBMmom has 6 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Long term care; med-surg; critical care.

1 Follower; 854 Posts; 12,163 Profile Views

My coworker is in a walking boot and still working bedside on the hospital. Obviously your activity tolerance will be determined by the doctor, but I don't think many hospitals will prevent a long-term employee from joining them for a short term issue. However, if you think you can't handle being on your feet to work, that may require that you alter your plans.

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in school nurse.

1,541 Posts; 14,280 Profile Views

2 minutes ago, JBMmom said:

My coworker is in a walking boot and still working bedside on the hospital. Obviously your activity tolerance will be determined by the doctor, but I don't think many hospitals will prevent a long-term employee from joining them for a short term issue. However, if you think you can't handle being on your feet to work, that may require that you alter your plans.

I disagree somewhat. It'd be different an employee was already on board, but if you were HR, which candidate would you choose- the one without limitations or the one with? (temporary or not)

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165 Posts; 1,528 Profile Views

I'm not sure about how easy it'll be to land a job in a boot, but a nurse where I'm doing clinicals is in a walking boot. Shes always on the move, too. 

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515 Posts; 3,992 Profile Views

I would not interview for any jobs while in this condition. I would wait until surgery is over and you are almost done with the boot or whatever you will need post surgery.  You want to put your best self forward in an interview, and showing up on crutches and needing surgery is not good. 

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,322 Posts; 46,389 Profile Views

Just another thought - you could be considered a vulnerable RISK not just to the facility's safety, but more importantly to your own wellbeing and recovery.

Even a small mishap could jeopardize you healing process and then you'll be worse off than ever.

To rnhopeful - I'm really surprised about that nurse you mention. I question if her original injury occurred on the job and she's under a 'light duty' worker's comp management plan?

If one were to zig when they should have zagged ..... Too much risk IMO.

To OP - are you eligible for short term disability? I would just worry about your being safe.

Sorry I can't give any better answer that you'd like to hear.

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165 Posts; 1,528 Profile Views

32 minutes ago, amoLucia said:

To rnhopeful - I'm really surprised about that nurse you mention. I question if her original injury occurred on the job and she's under a 'light duty' worker's comp management plan?

 

I think hers is a sprain? It did not happen at work and she was still having a full patient load. She seems fine though. 

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Cgritz77 has 6 years experience as a RN.

32 Posts; 683 Profile Views

40 minutes ago, amoLucia said:

Just another thought - you could be considered a vulnerable RISK not just to the facility's safety, but more importantly to your own wellbeing and recovery.

Even a small mishap could jeopardize you healing process and then you'll be worse off than ever.

To rnhopeful - I'm really surprised about that nurse you mention. I question if her original injury occurred on the job and she's under a 'light duty' worker's comp management plan?

If one were to zig when they should have zagged ..... Too much risk IMO.

To OP - are you eligible for short term disability? I would just worry about your being safe.

Sorry I can't give any better answer that you'd like to hear.

I understand that. Thank you for the concern 🙂 I am also concerned about my safety, and I figured it was a long shot, but it couldn't hurt to ask. I'm not sure about any disability. I don't know the ins and outs of that process. I left a job at the end of February and have been searching since. I have had a few interviews and a few employers were interested, but I have some complicated issues going on. In 2017, I had a DUI. Long story short, I have a lawyer involved and ended up signing some type of agreement with PNAP almost 3 months ago. However, I have not heard from them yet regarding what to do, and I reached out to them myself to shed some light on it, but they told me they couldn't give me an answer without seeing the agreement. So for weeks I have been trying to get my attorney to send me the agreement so I can send it to them, but to no avail. I was honest in my interviews with employers about going into that program, but they want to know specifics before they hire me, which I don't even know. The whole thing is a huge mess, and I really need income.

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Cgritz77 has 6 years experience as a RN.

32 Posts; 683 Profile Views

2 hours ago, Jedrnurse said:

I disagree somewhat. It'd be different an employee was already on board, but if you were HR, which candidate would you choose- the one without limitations or the one with? (temporary or not)

I definitely agree with this. If I were HR, depending on the candidate's experience, I'd most likely choose the person who isn't disabled.

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JBMmom has 6 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Long term care; med-surg; critical care.

1 Follower; 854 Posts; 12,163 Profile Views

1 hour ago, Cgritz77 said:

I definitely agree with this. If I were HR, depending on the candidate's experience, I'd most likely choose the person who isn't disabled.

It's illegal for a facility to not hire a qualified applicant due to a disability, including something like an injury, pregnancy, etc. Whether the foot injury would affect the OP's ability to be considered "qualified", I'm not sure. I'm not an HR expert, but legally it would not be a reason not to be hired.

This is from a business law website:

The law prohibits employers from asking potential employees about previous injuries during the interview process, even if the employee has an obvious disability. However, employers can ask job candidates whether they are able to perform specific functions the job requires, such as lifting items of a certain weight or standing for extended periods. Employers can also ask whether the candidate would need special accommodations to perform a given task.

Employee Disclosure

The law does not require a potential employee to disclose past injuries or disabilities during an interview, regardless of how he sustained them. Some job candidates may choose to disclose this information if they need special accommodations during the interview or on the job. Nonetheless, it is illegal for an employer to deny employment to an otherwise qualified candidate solely based on a previous injury or disabling condition.

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267 Posts; 5,926 Profile Views

I would still apply and interview. Sometimes the process takes a while anyway and you might be well on your way to recovery by the time they are ready for you. And, depending on the job, they might be willing to wait for you. I know we have waited a couple months for people to fulfill other obligations before starting. 

You could always mention when you schedule and interview that you are currently injured but still very interested if you want to be up front about it. The worst they can do is say no. 

Good luck!

Edited by ORoxyO

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SmilingBluEyes has 20 years experience.

2 Followers; 19,584 Posts; 65,816 Profile Views

Wait------did I read you had a DUI? Oh boy that is a problem. Unless and until you are cleared by the board (meaning you will have to successfully enter into Nurse Recovery Program ---name varies by state) you have a big problem. You may not even be eligible to work if there is any hold/limitation on your licensure. And your potential employer will be more than interested in this.

 

It's not the fracture you need to worry about, from what I see, but the DUI.

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