Why would this be used vs. usual?

Posted
by T-Wave T-Wave, RN Member

Specializes in Ophthalmology. Has 14 years experience.

Hi All,

New to helping out in an Ophthalmology clinic. Looking to understand why the clinic uses this closed iv catheter. What is a "closed" catheter, anyway?

I have included a link (below) of the BD Saf-T-Intima™ closed catheter.

https://www.bd.com/en-us/offerings/capabilities/infusion-therapy/iv-catheters/bd-saf-t-intima-closed-iv-catheter-system

Wondering why we are over same guage butterfly needle and regular "pigtail". We do use with a infusion pump for Visudyne therapy.

Thanks!

T-Wave

BettyGirard

BettyGirard, BSN

Specializes in School Nurse. 152 Posts

Quote

Preattached extension tubing offers a closed system to minimize blood exposure during catheter insertion.

Edited by BettyGirard

Wuzzie

4,864 Posts

^ What she said. Also I hate, hate, hate those IV catheters. Nothing like an uncovered needle flinging around on a wire. Ridiculous design. The Nexivas are much better if a closed system is a must. Give me an old-school Angio and I’ll take the exposure risk any day.

T-Wave

T-Wave, RN

Specializes in Ophthalmology. Has 14 years experience. 15 Posts

Thank you for your replies!

I totally agree about the needle part. That cover that is supposed to slide down seems a bit hinky.

I looked at the Nexivas. They do seem to be a much better design. I haven't seen those before. I will see if my hospital can get them!

As to the other part of the answer, I am not sure I understand. We are always trying to reduce exposure to blood. Why aren't these all the time?

So what types of situations would this device be used over a regular butterfly needle and extension set? Does it have to do with site placement (say a larger caliber vein) or that there will be frequent changes in connections?

Thank you!

Wuzzie

4,864 Posts

When you speak of “butterfly needle” what exactly are you talking about?The term can apply to any winged needle but some have different purposes. For example what we refer to as “butterflies” are strictly used for blood draws only, we never infuse through them. In fact the package they come in has a warning that they are not to be used for infusions. However, our Nexiva IV caths are also winged so technically a butterfly but we just call them IV caths or refer to them as a “Number 22l” or whatever gauge.

iluvivt

iluvivt, BSN, RN

Specializes in Infusion Nursing, Home Health Infusion. Has 32 years experience. 2,773 Posts

2 hours ago, Wuzzie said:

^ What she said. Also I hate, hate, hate those IV catheters. Nothing like an uncovered needle flinging around on a wire. Ridiculous design. The Nexivas are much better if a closed system is a must. Give me an old-school Angio and I’ll take the exposure risk any day.

Wuzzie...BD makes a Safety Intima and the needle is no longer exposed.The Intima wings and tubing are so much softer and easier to tape than the Diffisics and Nexivas.One drawback is that the intimas are not power-injectable capable but the design allows for the insertor to get flush to the skin for insertion.In certain vein locations it's very difficult to get the angle you need because of the design of the catheter but the Intima allows it.As an IV specialist I prefer to not only have one catheter to work with.

Wuzzie

4,864 Posts

Good to know that they have improved the Intimas. I have not had any problems with the Nexivas even with difficult angles. I still prefer Angios but alas I have no choice.

T-Wave

T-Wave, RN

Specializes in Ophthalmology. Has 14 years experience. 15 Posts

We use a 25G x 3/4" BD Vacutainer push button blood collection set when we do a regular fluorescein angiography.

Why not use a closed catheter for that as well?

T-Wave

Wuzzie

4,864 Posts

7 hours ago, T-Wave said:

We use a 25G x 3/4" BD Vacutainer push button blood collection set when we do a regular fluorescein angiography.

I bet if you look on the package it says "not for infusion". Ours do and apparently our radiologists don't care. They recently started using these types of butterflies to infuse the PET tracer because they worried about scant amounts of it sticking to the side walls of a regular IV catheter causing radiation poisoning or something of that sort.

T-Wave

T-Wave, RN

Specializes in Ophthalmology. Has 14 years experience. 15 Posts

We use a 25G x 3/4" BD Vacutainer push button blood collection set when we do a regular fluorescein angiography.

Why not use a closed catheter for that as well?

T-Wave

T-Wave

T-Wave, RN

Specializes in Ophthalmology. Has 14 years experience. 15 Posts

So when you say "angio" what does that mean? A specific product or is it a category?

Thanks!

T-Wave

Asystole RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Vascular Access, Infusion Therapy. 2,313 Posts

On 6/2/2019 at 4:43 PM, T-Wave said:

So when you say "angio" what does that mean? A specific product or is it a category?

Thanks!

T-Wave

You will hear "angio, angiocath, angiocatheter" from time to time. It is a genericized trademark which meaning varies from region to region. Typically it refers to a single lumen, round bore hub, peripheral IV catheter, sometimes for the longer +2" catheters.