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Why go to LPN school?

Nurses   (20,786 Views | 17 Replies)

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I sincerely ask this meaning no disrespect to LPNs/LVNs

This was a few years ago, but my classmates and I were out to lunch before clinicals (in scrubs), and the person working there was excited to share with us that she was in LPN school. She told us about the program and we were just really confused. Our RN program was 24 months total. Her LPN program was 18 months. She planned to go through a bridge program (12 months) through the same school to become an RN after working as an LPN for a while. Still, years later, this bothers me. You're already investing 18 months of work and school, why not just add the 6 months and be at your end goal?

Just to add, these are all private "for profit" schools, so acceptance isn't really an issue and pricing at both schools was comparable.

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MissDiagnosis has 2 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Rehab/LTC.

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Each person has their own unique reasons behind the journey they take. It shouldn't matter which route she chose to take, as long as it's the one she wanted.

I'm an LPN. I fully intend on going back to get my RN through a bridge program, then later get my BSN. For me, starting as an LPN gives me the opportunity to put food on the table, save money and still work on becoming the nurse I know I am capable of being.

I get asked constantly why I didn't just do my RN first. The answer is simple, I chose to become an LPN so I can work in the career I want and still be afforded the opportunity of furthering my education, while being able to provide for my beautiful family.

In the end, it shouldn't matter "why" or "why not". She has goals, and has a plan of action.

Some people choose to just be LPN's and there is no shame in that either.

Being an LPN isn't less than being an R.N. It's not the same but it's not less than by any means.

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Davey Do has 41 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

17 Followers; 1 Article; 6,693 Posts; 82,888 Profile Views

I didn't know if I really wanted to be a nurse, so I thought one year of training and checking out the field wouldn't waste a lot of my time, so I became an LPN.

I'm glad I took that route and one reason was that the clinical time in LPN training was much more than in the RN program. Half of the day in the LPN program was spent in clinicals. Not nearly as much in the RN program.

But I kind of see where you're coming from, Remotefuse- what's six months?

Yeah...

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

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I sincerely ask this meaning no disrespect to LPNs/LVNs

This was a few years ago, but my classmates and I were out to lunch before clinicals (in scrubs), and the person working there was excited to share with us that she was in LPN school. She told us about the program and we were just really confused. Our RN program was 24 months total. Her LPN program was 18 months. She planned to go through a bridge program (12 months) through the same school to become an RN after working as an LPN for a while. Still, years later, this bothers me. You're already investing 18 months of work and school, why not just add the 6 months and be at your end goal?

Just to add, these are all private "for profit" schools, so acceptance isn't really an issue and pricing at both schools was comparable.

Class difference is probably the biggest reason. Six months longer and a "little bit" more money out of pocket are manageable to some. Others are not so fortunate. They need to make a smaller investment for less pay and get to work NOW.

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Alex Egan has 9 years experience as a LPN, EMT-B and specializes in Home Health (PDN), Camp Nursing.

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So for me it was a two part issue.

1. I loved being an emt. Does this translate to nursing. I would rather invest a year and 11k to find out than 3 years and 30k. At that time the local ADN program was usually 3 years and more often longer because of the scam they had going for clinical. It was a lottery, you do all the prerequisites and then apply to nursing. If you didn't have an A in A&P 1 and 2 as well as a few other classes you wouldn't make the cut. You could try again next year but had to be a part time student the entire time. The result was lots of debt and time. This practice is now illegal.

2. My family was poor. Not the, well we can just not eat out as much poor. We were getting food from the food bank and moving ever 4 months to keep from being evicted, even with my parents having full time work. 6 months would have been a real strain. Not to mention the greater debt.

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1 Post; 72 Profile Views

Why not got to lpn school?

I was a CNA first and now I am a lpn student. I think it’s good to experience each to be able to empathize with ALL nurses. Being able to know what that person goes through helps you better understand. Some nurses who haven’t had the experience can not relate to someone who has and that’s the difference. Also my program is 11 months and if I decide to get my RN it will be an additional 10 months.

Edited by Jcoleman92

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Lurkndmurk has 1 years experience as a LPN.

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My LPN program was only 3 semesters- all in all though, including breaks & time off- it was about 8 or 9 months. I am a single mother, i planned on taking work off to go into nursing school because I wanted to give school everything I had without any distractions. Initially planned to go straight for my RN until i heard about the LPN program. I figured it would be MUCH easier to take a year off of work instead of 2 years. Plus now that I got my LPN- I am making TRIPLE what a made before (minimum wage SUCKS)- in one weekend I made what I used to make in TWO weeks! This is going to benefit me EXTREMELY for the LPN to RN bridge program, since I won't have to bust my butt full time working minimum wage; I can easily do 2 or 3 shifts without having to struggle financially.

Added bonus- I wasn't sure if nursing was going to be the right career for me. LPN program gave me the opportunity to test the waters and see if I would even make it (I was a straight A student). I was concerned that I wasn't going to be smart enough and that I would hate it. I'm an introvert, but I realized I'm a different person when I'm caring for my patients and i love it. It fills my soul with a renewed sense of being and accomplishment. Its the most amazing feeling in the world; I actually feel like I'm making a difference 🙂 

I was also getting older.. I kind of wanted something solid to show that I was doing something with my life before I turned 30. I dont know why... but personally, it helped me feel like I accomplished something really special since I got to become a Nurse in my 20's.

I wasn't able to apply for the 2018 RN program because I didn't have the classes required. I would've JUST started the ADN program this semester if i went the other route... Either way, I would have graduated as an ADN in the same amount of time because I will be in the 2020 bridge program and graduate spring 2021 (which would've been the same graduation date had I started ADN Fall 2019).

It made more sense for me to do it this way. I'm proud to be an LPN, I worked SO hard to get here. I don't have family around (theyre in a different state) so being a single mom with a toddler, it was rough. But my son is so proud and loves telling everyone that his mom is a nurse & that I help people- HE WANTS TO BE A NURSE NOW TOO! 🙂 It was worth every struggle to see him waving at me during graduation with a HUGE grin on his face. I dont think he completely understood since he was only 3, but it was still an awesome feeling

I love nursing & the LPN program was the BEST decision I could have made. I don't think I could have handled 2 years of nursing school. I like having 2 semesters off before I go back for round 2 🙂 LPN school burned me out with constantly studying ( we had exams literally every week or every other week.) I'm not sure if ADN is as intense, but I don't think I would've survived 2 straight years. I pushed myself to the edge & finished JUST in time before falling over.

Everyone is different, everyone has different paths. 😉 

Edited by Lurkndmurk

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Snatchedwig has 12 years experience as a ADN, CNA, LPN, RN and specializes in Medsurg.

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1. Not your business why someone chooses whatever decision in their lives. 

2. As stated before, I learned so much clinically in my LPN program.  I did so many skills as a LPN student vs a RN student. I also had a better clinical experience in totality.  

3. I rely on my CNA and LPN experience as a RN. If it wasn't for either it wouldn't have made me the nurse I am today.

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CharleeFoxtrot has 7 years experience as a ADN, RN.

629 Posts; 8,237 Profile Views

13 hours ago, Snatchedwig said:

1. Not your business why someone chooses whatever decision in their lives. 

2. As stated before, I learned so much clinically in my LPN program.  I did so many skills as a LPN student vs a RN student. I also had a better clinical experience in totality.  

3. I rely on my CNA and LPN experience as a RN. If it wasn't for either it wouldn't have made me the nurse I am today.

I was a paramedic and went through a bridge to RN program with RTs and LPNs and other medics of course. The LPNs helped everyone with the labs for practical skills and had great advice. Seems like their programs were a lot heavier on real world skills.

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1,180 Posts; 9,636 Profile Views

I started out as an LVN.  For me it was because the ADN programs in my area are difficult to get in to if your pre-req grades are not great.  It did take me 2 semesters longer than some of my friends but I didn't care.

I finished my LVN program in July 2005 and turned around and applied for the LVN-Rn transition program for January 2006 and got in.  Way less competitive going the LVN-RN route.  Finished the ADN program in May 2007.  No regrets at all.  Plus side was that while I attended the ADN program I was able to make some decent money as an LVN.  

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3 Followers; 5,663 Posts; 27,725 Profile Views

17 hours ago, Snatchedwig said:

1. Not your business why someone chooses whatever decision in their lives. 

 

The OP didn't say she grilled a particular person about her choices. She's asking a question to the general readership of AN. This is exactly the place for a question of this nature.

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Snatchedwig has 12 years experience as a ADN, CNA, LPN, RN and specializes in Medsurg.

2 Followers; 368 Posts; 3,047 Profile Views

3 hours ago, Horseshoe said:

The OP didn't say she grilled a particular person about her choices. She's asking a question to the general readership of AN. This is exactly the place for a question of this nature.

I never said she did. Where do you see that I said that? I said it's not her business. Dont add extra fluff to my response.

Edited by Snatchedwig

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