Jump to content

Why go to LPN school?

Nurses   (763 Views 6 Comments)
by remotefuse remotefuse (Member) Member

5,583 Profile Views; 177 Posts

I sincerely ask this meaning no disrespect to LPNs/LVNs

This was a few years ago, but my classmates and I were out to lunch before clinicals (in scrubs), and the person working there was excited to share with us that she was in LPN school. She told us about the program and we were just really confused. Our RN program was 24 months total. Her LPN program was 18 months. She planned to go through a bridge program (12 months) through the same school to become an RN after working as an LPN for a while. Still, years later, this bothers me. You're already investing 18 months of work and school, why not just add the 6 months and be at your end goal?

Just to add, these are all private "for profit" schools, so acceptance isn't really an issue and pricing at both schools was comparable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MissDiagnosis has <1 years experience.

18 Posts; 188 Profile Views

Each person has their own unique reasons behind the journey they take. It shouldn't matter which route she chose to take, as long as it's the one she wanted.

I'm an LPN. I fully intend on going back to get my RN through a bridge program, then later get my BSN. For me, starting as an LPN gives me the opportunity to put food on the table, save money and still work on becoming the nurse I know I am capable of being.

I get asked constantly why I didn't just do my RN first. The answer is simple, I chose to become an LPN so I can work in the career I want and still be afforded the opportunity of furthering my education, while being able to provide for my beautiful family.

In the end, it shouldn't matter "why" or "why not". She has goals, and has a plan of action.

Some people choose to just be LPN's and there is no shame in that either.

Being an LPN isn't less than being an R.N. It's not the same but it's not less than by any means.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

15 Followers; 1 Article; 6,341 Posts; 77,947 Profile Views

I didn't know if I really wanted to be a nurse, so I thought one year of training and checking out the field wouldn't waste a lot of my time, so I became an LPN.

I'm glad I took that route and one reason was that the clinical time in LPN training was much more than in the RN program. Half of the day in the LPN program was spent in clinicals. Not nearly as much in the RN program.

But I kind of see where you're coming from, Remotefuse- what's six months?

Yeah...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

2 Followers; 4,167 Posts; 29,833 Profile Views

I sincerely ask this meaning no disrespect to LPNs/LVNs

This was a few years ago, but my classmates and I were out to lunch before clinicals (in scrubs), and the person working there was excited to share with us that she was in LPN school. She told us about the program and we were just really confused. Our RN program was 24 months total. Her LPN program was 18 months. She planned to go through a bridge program (12 months) through the same school to become an RN after working as an LPN for a while. Still, years later, this bothers me. You're already investing 18 months of work and school, why not just add the 6 months and be at your end goal?

Just to add, these are all private "for profit" schools, so acceptance isn't really an issue and pricing at both schools was comparable.

Class difference is probably the biggest reason. Six months longer and a "little bit" more money out of pocket are manageable to some. Others are not so fortunate. They need to make a smaller investment for less pay and get to work NOW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alex Egan has 9 years experience as a LPN, EMT-B and specializes in Home Health (PDN), Camp Nursing.

6 Articles; 854 Posts; 23,113 Profile Views

So for me it was a two part issue.

1. I loved being an emt. Does this translate to nursing. I would rather invest a year and 11k to find out than 3 years and 30k. At that time the local ADN program was usually 3 years and more often longer because of the scam they had going for clinical. It was a lottery, you do all the prerequisites and then apply to nursing. If you didn't have an A in A&P 1 and 2 as well as a few other classes you wouldn't make the cut. You could try again next year but had to be a part time student the entire time. The result was lots of debt and time. This practice is now illegal.

2. My family was poor. Not the, well we can just not eat out as much poor. We were getting food from the food bank and moving ever 4 months to keep from being evicted, even with my parents having full time work. 6 months would have been a real strain. Not to mention the greater debt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

1 Post; 37 Profile Views

Why not got to lpn school?

I was a CNA first and now I am a lpn student. I think it’s good to experience each to be able to empathize with ALL nurses. Being able to know what that person goes through helps you better understand. Some nurses who haven’t had the experience can not relate to someone who has and that’s the difference. Also my program is 11 months and if I decide to get my RN it will be an additional 10 months.

Edited by Jcoleman92

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×