Jump to content

Why???? Are?? They?? Failing???

Students   (7,591 Views 40 Comments)
by Nurseades2b Nurseades2b (New) New

1,328 Profile Views; 11 Posts

I know there are other articles on this but I need some good encouragement today from y'all. I started first semester this week and I was amazed to see there are about 10 out of 87 in my class who are repeats. That scares me! It's not my schools fault. My school's pass rate for NCLEX is above national average. I am extremely self motivated, don't mind studying 5+ hours a day, I have no husband and no kids and no job (yay student loans!) so I can GIVE what it takes. I have friends but am okay to not hang out with them. I've never been one to have to "have a social life" I just started getting scared this week wondering "will this happen to me even if I give and sacrifice everything??" I DO NOT want to be a repeat! I'm ready to be a nurse. Failure is not an option. Why do you think people fail? Please encourage a newbie!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 317,662 Profile Views

Less people fail than we realize...

However, those who fail are more likely to be vocal about their predicaments, while people who pass are inclined to move on with their lives. It is called negativity bias: other peoples' derogatory life events remain seared into our awareness.

For instance, from reading posts on these forums, we'd think that failing NCLEX is a part of everyday life. However, 85 percent of US-educated candidates pass on the first attempt. But due to negativity bias, the small minority of people who fail remain etched into our memories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

4 Followers; 4 Articles; 8,882 Posts; 104,374 Profile Views

For some, it can be the transition from being taught as a child into adult learning. Two very different things, and I did not handle it well- I ended up on academic probation after my first semester.

Others don't realize just how difficult nursing school can be, and they do not adequately prepare- organizing themselves, studying, etc. Others don't know how to study, and don't ask for help.

Some people just aren't cut out to handle the rigor of nursing school.

So what can you do to help yourself succeed? Know how to study in the ways that work best for you- take a learning styles inventory. If you have trouble understanding something, ask for help- see a tutor, utilize office hours, join a study group. There are so many ways to set yourself up for success, but there are also things you can do or neglect to do that will set you up for failure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 317,662 Profile Views

I had another thought that I was initially reluctant to mention...some (but not all) nursing programs admit students who lack academic prowess.

A student who struggled through foundational prerequisite coursework has a higher likelihood of failing than one who hit the ground running and never looked back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HelloWish has 3 years experience as a ADN, BSN and specializes in IMCU, Oncology.

485 Posts; 7,117 Profile Views

We have had about a third of our class fail going into the 4th and final semester. We too have a high NCLEX pass rate. I have personally felt that the majority of the students who are less likely to pass the NCLEX will fail and thus the reason for the high NCLEX pass rate.

I went into my program knowing I would do what it takes to pass and succeed throughout and have been very successful thus far. The people who I have seen fail, IMO didn't learn to take NCLEX style questions and didn't focus on what they needed to learn as a nurse, spending too much time on content that we really aren't tested on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11 Posts; 1,328 Profile Views

I absolutely LOVE what you said about negativity bias. I could not agree more. I've heard before that you don't hear positive things about NS on the internet because the Internet is usually a place where people come to vent- not to celebrate. I truly wish there were more positive people encouraging each other. Who knows how many have been scared out of nursing school? Thanks for your encouragement! I can and will do this!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

111 Posts; 2,336 Profile Views

First, I would plan to spend every evening, and a good part of the weekend studying. It may not take you that much time, but if you plan for it then you will happily surprised with your excess time.

Second, definitely try different types of studying (re-listening to lectures, reading the textbook, YouTube, study groups, flashcards, re-writing study guides, etc). Nursing school and NCLEX style questions are TOTALLY different than what you did in your pre-reqs. It may take a different type of studying for you to absorb the knowledge in the way needed to do well on the tests.

Third, know yourself. If you are a previous 4.0 student you may not be after your 1st semester of nursing school. Do your best, and ask for help when needed. Accept that nursing school is hard and accept that you may not get all As. However, if you got into nursing school by the skin of your teeth, be prepared to up your game. In most nursing schools the grade scale is harder, a 76% is failing in my school. A C can very easily slide into a D come finals, so never get complacent!

There is a high fail rate in most nursing schools because the school wants to keep it's NCLEX pass rate high. I picked my school because it has the highest pass rate in the state. If they let people who probably won't pass the NCLEX graduate then it will lower their pass rate and lower their desirability. Lower desirability means less tuition $, so it is a no brainer for them :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jacob080110 specializes in Oncology.

27 Posts; 2,174 Profile Views

Out of the 36 students that began the nursing program, at the school I attended, when I did, only 6 of us graduated (on time). Our school had an NCLEX pass rate above the national average but this is only because they did not allow anyone to make it through the program if they were not 100% certain they would pass the NCLEX the first time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

927 Posts; 9,350 Profile Views

There are many individual factors. A lot of students are older and juggle family and a job while doing the rigors of nursing school. I worked full time nights when I was in nursing school. There was one semester where I was hanging on by the proverbial thread. I had my bachelors already in another field, I thought it would be a cake walk, cause hey, I made it through college once before, right? So for me, nursing school was a wake up call - I had never worked harder academically than I did while in school.

So I can't speak for others, but I can guess there are others who have life choices they've made and are now trying to remedy that by changing careers and trying to pay the mortgage.

I do know there were some very young ones whose mothers/aunts/sisters/cousins are nurses and they just fell into it, not realizing that's not what they wanted. But it was all they really knew or were pressured into it. You can't make someone do what they don't want to do, is all I'm saying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

direw0lf has <1 years experience as a BSN.

1,045 Posts; 10,771 Profile Views

I've been on AN fairly regularly since August. People on here have stated they failed because of having a hard time managing their personal issues with nursing school. Some of them failed only by 1-2 points. I want to keep from taking out student loans, so I work and try hard to get the most out of scholarships. It's definitely getting harder as my nursing classes get harder, but I stay ahead of my assignments and studying and tune out distractions when I have to.

P.S. With your determination you sound like you're setting yourself up for success not failure..just stay ahead and beware of drama with your classmates!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jacob080110 specializes in Oncology.

27 Posts; 2,174 Profile Views

My highest level of education, before college, (and besides a GED I earned on a whim at age 14), was the third grade. I NEVER once struggled with any type of class or came anywhere close to a C throughout my entire college career. I am one of the least intelligent people in a room at any given moment, but I finished an ASN program in 18 months, passed NCLECX in 37 minutes with 78 questions, and NEVER came close to struggling. If you show up to every class and take notes, there is no reason to worry or waste time studying. If a loser dropout such as myself can make it through nursing school, then there is literally NO excuse for anyone to fail.

Edited by Jacob080110
missed period, haha

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

168 Posts; 4,886 Profile Views

My school has a 99% pass rate but we have lost 7 of our original 20. It is tough and time consuming. Statistical speak, those we have lost tend to be young and first time degree. Those with kids and husband's are staying strong. I would have thought they would have a better chance for life to get in the way. I am a mom of 3 and in my 40's. I think having life experience helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×