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Why are accelerated BSN programs closing?

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by lexladybug lexladybug (New Member) New Member

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I live in the DC area and a decade ago, I considered changing careers and doing an accelerated BSN. Some of the local options included Georgetown and Johns Hopkins. My career took a detour and nearly 10 years later, I started looking into programs again and found that neither of these programs are offered anymore.

Does anyone know why- is this a trend all around? Were there problems with successful completion of a program at this pace? I had only looked into a few local universities because I can't move for school so this limits options quite a bit. Just curious why this is happening.

I even emailed Georgetown to ask what had happened to the program and the administrator who wrote back simply said "We do not have an accelerated BSN program, but feel free to reach out if you are ever interested in one of our Master of Science in Nursing programs!" which I found odd!

Thanks!

Edited by lexladybug
typo

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45 Likes; 1 Follower; 47,310 Visitors; 2,128 Posts

[...]

I even emailed Georgetown to ask what had happened to the program and the administrator who wrote back simply said "We do not have an accelerated BSN program, but feel free to reach out if you are ever interested in one of our Master of Science in Nursing programs!" which I found odd!

Thanks!

While I haven't noticed this trend in my area, this doesn't surprise me. And, I think you have your answer here, when you compare cost and length of the accelerated BSN with the master's entry programs.

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llg has 40 years experience as a PhD, RN and works as a Nursing Professional Development + Academic Facult.

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I certainly don't know about other schools, but I know that one accelerated program in my area closed because their graduates had trouble passing their courses and their NCLEX pass rates were not good. The same school's traditional program had good NCLEX pass rates. So they figured that the acceleration probably had something to do with the problems -- and closed that program.

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This must be a local phenomenon. ABSN programs are very much alive and thriving everywhere else.

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NICU Guy has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a NICU RN.

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ABSN programs in this area are thriving along with their traditional programs. The ABSN program that I attended had a near 100% first time NCLEX pass rate. My cohort had a 100% pass rate with half passing at 75 questions.

Edited by NICU Guy

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Quota has <1 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Oncology.

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DC metro resident here who just recently finished an accelerated BSN program. My program everyone was successful in classes and I don't know official NCLEX pass rates but everyone I'm in contact with from my cohort passed. My school's accelerated program has had higher NCLEX pass rates than the traditional program as well. Their accelerated program isn't going anywhere.

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Might be local ...

I'm a grad of an ABSN, and that program has an enormous waiting list and was highly competitive (last time I saw it was 3 years). There are two other schools in the area that just started their own to meet demand.

Everyone passed the NCLEX in our graduating class of 60, according to the newsletter sent out that year. Not sure of the official stats for years past and since, I'd have to look.

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I'm in an accelerated nursing program and this will be the last year as a BSN. They told us it's due to the financial burden for students, since it's hard to get federal financial aid for a second bsn so students must apply for private loans. They will be converting to an MSN to help with this

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a school nurse.

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I'm in an accelerated nursing program and this will be the last year as a BSN. They told us it's due to the financial burden for students, since it's hard to get federal financial aid for a second bsn so students must apply for private loans. They will be converting to an MSN to help with this

Ah! Mystery solved...

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I don't know regarding the above. Plausible...I'm in an ABSN program, but others in my area have shut down to become CNL programs.

Oops, posted before I was finished...

I think it's about the money and prestige of having master's/doctoral programs. Why have students commit to 12-15 months, when you can get them hooked for at least a couple years. The CNL designation is also a carrot, I believe. They make students believe they will be promoted faster than the average RN, but I have yet to see this happen.

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llg has 40 years experience as a PhD, RN and works as a Nursing Professional Development + Academic Facult.

247 Likes; 5 Followers; 57,555 Visitors; 12,977 Posts

I'm in an accelerated nursing program and this will be the last year as a BSN. They told us it's due to the financial burden for students, since it's hard to get federal financial aid for a second bsn so students must apply for private loans. They will be converting to an MSN to help with this

That's how some of the original CNL programs and entry-level MSN programs started. I had forgotten that until your post reminded me of it. Students were paying bit money and not qualifying for undergraduate loans because they already had undergraduate degrees. So they had to come up with some entry-level MSN options.

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