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Who still works as a floor nurse?

NP   (6,636 Views 17 Comments)
by OCRN3 OCRN3 (Member)

OCRN3 has 16 years experience and specializes in Med/surg, Tele, educator, FNP.

8,365 Profile Views; 388 Posts

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Who can't let working the floor go after getting the NP license and a NP job? Who misses the 3 days a week and comradeship?

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

143 Articles; 20,816 Posts; 187,653 Profile Views

Okay - I've been APRN for 10 years now and I still volunteer as pre-hospital RN! (lol - my little adrenaline rush). I'm at the ALS level so I run my own codes, intubate, do needle decompressions, the whole deal). My nursing background is mostly level 1 trauma center so it fits well to keep me current.

There are some days that I wish I hadn't gone back to school....please don't blast me for this....

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sailornurse has 39 years experience and specializes in ER/Tele, Med-Surg, Faculty, Urgent Care.

1,231 Posts; 17,056 Profile Views

Nope. Do Not Miss floor nursing. Not at all. After 20+ years on med-surg, no. The 12 hour shifts were one reason for returning for NP.

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5 Posts; 421 Profile Views

I definitely miss the comradeship. I was an RN for 13 years before becoming an NP. With some exceptions, my fellow RNs were friends and supporters. In my own personal 2-year experience as an NP in 2 different jobs, my fellow NPs/PAs in the workplace perpetuate a toxic work environment with being hypercritical, forming cliques, giving silent treatments, and bullying that slides downhill from the malignant, micromanaging physicians that I have worked under. I'm sure I'm the only one who feels this way, but I wish I had never become an NP. I actually had more autonomy, was treated with more respect, and had more meaningful/satisfying/rewarding patient contact as an RN.

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Alicia777 specializes in Surgery.

268 Posts; 5,836 Profile Views

I definitely miss the comradeship. I was an RN for 13 years before becoming an NP. With some exceptions, my fellow RNs were friends and supporters. In my own personal 2-year experience as an NP in 2 different jobs, my fellow NPs/PAs in the workplace perpetuate a toxic work environment with being hypercritical, forming cliques, giving silent treatments, and bullying that slides downhill from the malignant, micromanaging physicians that I have worked under. I'm sure I'm the only one who feels this way, but I wish I had never become an NP. I actually had more autonomy, was treated with more respect, and had more meaningful/satisfying/rewarding patient contact as an RN.

I was only 'liking' your first statement, sorry you feel that way. I too worked for about 15 years as an RN and miss my RN friends. Although I do have PA peers whom I get along with great and surgeons who are also overwhelmingly great to work with, I still feel in 'limbo' socially. Hard to explain I guess but that part was much easier/better as a nurse. I couldn't see myself returning to the floor to fulfill it though!

Edited by Alicia777

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Psychcns has 30 years experience and specializes in Psychiatric Nursing.

3 Articles; 859 Posts; 17,403 Profile Views

@sadNP. Move on! Get your resume together and start interviewing.

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juan de la cruz has 27 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care.

8 Articles; 3,791 Posts; 58,100 Profile Views

As ICU NP's, we still have the three 12-hr shifts, weekends, and holidays. We have a big group of our own (20 NP's and growing) so we do have that camaraderie. We also still have close relationships with bedside RN's because that's part of the job. We get invited to unit Christmas parties for sure so it doesn't seem like an "us vs them" dynamic.

Working in an academic setting, you will have residents and fellows coming through and having a social relationship with that particular group of physicians can be optional...some of us have made long lasting friendships with these individuals even after they've moved on to other settings. Some of us also have close social relationships with attendings. I think as an NP, your social circle can get bigger depending on your personality...we do have close relationships with critical care Pharmacists as well and some of us extend that outside of work.

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OCRN3 has 16 years experience and specializes in Med/surg, Tele, educator, FNP.

388 Posts; 8,365 Profile Views

Hi Juan, Love to hear there are these kind of jobs out there!

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163 Posts; 3,930 Profile Views

I will graduate in may and was tentatively offered a NP position on a CT surgery floor (where I have been a RN for 6 years). The position would be 3 12's & 1 weekend/month. I thought about 5 8's/week but I have young kids and it would be impossible to take them to appointments and other activities. I actually do not mind the 12's shifts.

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reggaemuffin is a MSN, NP, CNS and specializes in Registered Nurse.

106 Posts; 2,679 Profile Views

I will graduate in may and was tentatively offered a NP position on a CT surgery floor (where I have been a RN for 6 years). The position would be 3 12's & 1 weekend/month. I thought about 5 8's/week but I have young kids and it would be impossible to take them to appointments and other activities. I actually do not mind the 12's shifts.

Think long and hard before accepting that position. It may be hard for your RN coworkers to respect your new position, especially if it involves giving them orders. I had a friend who did this and it became very uncomfortable. it was like straddling two worlds. She ended up doing nursing tasks on top of her NP duties. Just food for thought.

Also, I get along much better with my fellow NPs then I ever did as a nurse. There were always some nurses that I knew were going to leave me a patient who needed blood but had no IV access or a new admission with no paperwork done. It created tension between some of us. Although full disclosure- I hated being a bedside nurse. I was miserable every shift so I'm provavly a bit biased.

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evolvingrn is a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice.

1,035 Posts; 8,244 Profile Views

I'm still new ..... It's a little odd in the clinic world but I'm not hating it. I don't need a social life at work....

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Goldenfox has 12 years experience.

303 Posts; 3,508 Profile Views

I definitely miss the comradeship. I was an RN for 13 years before becoming an NP. With some exceptions, my fellow RNs were friends and supporters. In my own personal 2-year experience as an NP in 2 different jobs, my fellow NPs/PAs in the workplace perpetuate a toxic work environment with being hypercritical, forming cliques, giving silent treatments, and bullying that slides downhill from the malignant, micromanaging physicians that I have worked under. I'm sure I'm the only one who feels this way, but I wish I had never become an NP. I actually had more autonomy, was treated with more respect, and had more meaningful/satisfying/rewarding patient contact as an RN.

Its not being an NP that's the problem. Its the places where you have been working. There are physicians and workplaces out there that totally suck. Sorry, but there's no nice way to say it. You have experience so you have more options. You should leave that toxic place and those nasty people behind and move on.

My view of the workplace setup is a bit different than the norm. I believe that a new job is nothing more than an audition. I don't believe in staying on at any job for too long if I give it enough time and it's not working out for me. Nasty coworkers are usually not an issue for me. I simply ignore them and their foolishness. I never let it get to the point of bullying. If they are doing things that interfere with my ability to do my job I confront them. I don't do micromanaging physicians either. If they see it necessary to be constantly meddling in what I'm doing then they need to do it themselves or get somebody else. Life is too short to waste on ridiculous people and their nonsense. Locum is the way to go. Perfect way to try out different workplaces until you find one that you like.

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