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Which degree to go for?

Pre-Nursing   (1,408 Views 8 Comments)

953 Profile Views; 21 Posts

Hello,

I'm having trouble deciding which would be best for me to do. I'm still young, only nineteen, and I am willing to invest in my future. I'd like to work in labor and delivery, and eventually work in neonatal. In order to do that do I need to become a nurse practitioner? Would it be best to get my associates, and do a bridge program for a bachelors? Then work for a few years, and apply to graduate schools? Or just go straight for my bachelors?

Thank you for any suggestions! Greatly appreciated :)

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Devon Rex has 5 years experience as a ADN, BSN and specializes in Rehab, Ortho-Spine, Med-Surg, & Psych.

545 Posts; 7,942 Profile Views

Hello!

To answer your first question... no, you do not need to be a nurse practitioner to work in Labor & Delivery. I suggest you get your Associates Degree in Nursing first. This program will expose you to different areas of healthcare, including hospitals, and will give you a better undestanding of what it is like to work in L&D. Once you get your Associates degree, you can take the State Board exam called NCLEX-RN to become a registered nurse. That right there would be a great accomplishment. Not everyone can make it through the program.

Typically, people try to get jobs at this point. There are many online programs to complete a bridge RN-to-BSN. That's a bachelor's degree. This usually wont make you earn a a whole lot more money, but it is very desirable from the employer's perspective. SO, if you have the time, money, and energy... I'd definitely go for it.

For many years, in order to become a Nurse Practitioner, you would complete a Master's degree. Universities are now moving towards a doctorate degree instead. Eventually (in less than 5 years), the Master's degree for NPs will be gone.

If I were you, don't worry about the NP track until after you have become an RN. AT that point, you should have a lot more exposure to the field and you might find yourself surprised by the things you will learn.

Good luck with your studies !! It is worth it !!

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34 Posts; 1,144 Profile Views

If you just want to work in L&D as an RN you do not need a masters degree, HOWEVER if you want to actually deliver babies in the L&D you need a masters to be certified as a Nurse Midwife. This degree focuses a lot more on babies and their needs more so than a NP program. The rumor that schools will be phasing out masters degrees in nursing is just that, a rumor. There are currently only a handful of schools in the country that even offer these degrees so it's not even remotely feasible that in five years ALL SCHOOLS and ALL HOSPITALS will only teach/accept doctorate degrees in nursing. I have been volunteering in a local hospital for almost a year and I have never seen one person with a doctorate in nursing.

I am personally opting for the ADN route because I live in CA and the CSU system is just an absolute mess right now. Also, spots for transfer students in their nursing programs are almost nonexistent. I am lucky that there are about ten community colleges within 20 miles of my house so it will be just all around easier for me to earn my ADN and then do the RN-BSN bridge at our local CSU because that program is not currently impacted (although all programs at that school will become impacted Fall 2013 so who knows). If a BSN was more accessible to me I would probably do that because It would take me less time than the ADN-BSN route especially since a decade or two down the line I would like the option of becoming an NP which will be easier in old age if I already have my BSN.

Good luck in whatever you choose to do and hope this helps some! :loveya:

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Devon Rex has 5 years experience as a ADN, BSN and specializes in Rehab, Ortho-Spine, Med-Surg, & Psych.

545 Posts; 7,942 Profile Views

Hello Devyn Renee,

You misunderstood me. I did not say the master degree in nursing was going to be phased out or anything else. You are blowing my answer out of proportion.

I am referring to the Nurse Practitioner's master degree. It is NOT a rumor, it is a fact. It is being replaced by a doctorate degree for Nurse Practitioners. You can still go for a masters in Nursing, but that is not what PassionwithaPurpose was asking or refering to.

Log on to the University of Florida's website, refer to the second question. College of Nursing - University of Florida

It reads:

Q: Will the new DNP mean the end to nursing master's degree programs?

Over the next several years, it is expected that nursing schools will begin to phase out those master's degree tracks that prepare nurses for advanced practice (e.g., nurse practitioner). This is in keeping with national recommendations (American Association of Colleges of Nursing and the accrediting body, Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education) that as of 2015, advanced practice nurses should be prepared with a DNP, not a master's degree. The national bodies that offer the certification exams for advanced practice are expected to require nurses to hold a DNP prior to examination as of 2015, and perhaps earlier for some specialties. Selected schools may initially offer the DNP as a completion program for those who already hold a master's degree in nursing. However, over time many schools will phase out the advanced practice master's degree tracks. The DNP is designed to be a post-baccalaureate degree and there is considerable interest among baccalaureate degree graduates in pursuing this degree already.

Other master's degree tracks in nursing, such as the Clinical Nurse Leader and will continue.

*** The lesson here : Verify your references before you cast someone of "spreading rumors". The sooner you learn this, in the long run... the easier your life will be, and the less embarrasing moments you will have in front of others. ***

I do not mean to come down hard on you, I have a 17 year old... it pains me today's youth often go by what others say (especially people they trust) and do not question or verify their assertions. This leaves you vulnerable to be ridiculed by the ones who know the facts. If someone says something is a fact, ask them where they heard it or read it. Then follow up corroborating it. If you find informaiton that contradicts the person's assertions, confront them with your facts and sources... then you come out on top... and impress people with our skills. :)

Edited by Devon Rex

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34 Posts; 1,144 Profile Views

I may have misinterpreted what you said in your original post and I am willing to admit that I also admit that I was not very clear in my own post. I am familiar with the CCNE position on the DNP but it doesn't sound as concrete to me as it does to you obviously. The 2015 deadline sounds more like a goal date to me and I honestly have a hard time believing that all masters NP programs are just going to poof out of existence in the next two and a half years. I also don't think it is likely that if a school choses to retain a masters level NP program after 2015 and their governing BON allows NP's with masters degrees to practice in their state that the CCNE will withdraw their accreditation from that program. I don't think any of these things are set in stone and the way you conveyed your information made it seem as though they were, hence the "spreading rumors" bit. I apologize that that comment offended you as much as it did but I believe you also should apologize because I have a strong feeling that you wouldn't have chastised me the way you did in your last post if I was a couple decades older.

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Devon Rex has 5 years experience as a ADN, BSN and specializes in Rehab, Ortho-Spine, Med-Surg, & Psych.

545 Posts; 7,942 Profile Views

Age does give you a different perspective in life. There is absolutely nothing wrong with being your age. In fact, it is absolutely wonderful you know at this stage wha you want to do. You only need to be open to other peple's view, then discern what you want and want you don't want.

As it runed out, we are talking apples and oranges. We both have a point. I hope that PassiowithaPurpose got the answer they were looking for.

I apologize for coming across as chastising you... not what I meant. Sorry.

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154 Posts; 2,143 Profile Views

Do you have any obligations other than school, such as kids? If not, I would go straight for your BSN. The job market is pretty bleak and the higher degree with give you a better chance of getting hired as a new grad.

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21 Posts; 953 Profile Views

Nope, no children. I am 19 years old, so I think it would be best to just go straight for my BSN. Thanks!

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