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When nurse is needed outside of the clinic

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by Feral.Cat.Herder Feral.Cat.Herder (Member)

Feral.Cat.Herder has 22 years experience and works as a School Nurse.

1 Follower; 1,854 Visitors; 126 Posts

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I get so frustrated with phone/radio calls to the clinic requesting a nurse to such-n-such location on campus and when I ask about the situation I am about to walk into ( so I know equipment and/or wheelchair I may need to bring) know one seems to know what's going on or why a nurse is needed. Occasionally I may get "I kid is lying/sitting on the ground"..... is the kid conscious, did he faint, did he fall.... what caused him to make contact with the ground?!? I've attempted to educated the staff on giving more detailed information when requesting the nurse come to assess a student outside the clinic. Somehow it's not sinking in.

Do any of you have this problems or found solutions to solving it? 😖

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laflaca has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Public High School Nurse.

7,874 Visitors; 279 Posts

Every day, all day. I don't want them to triage for me or decide to call STAT vs "when available" because they only see body fluids as an emergency (loud "vomiting," a tiny drizzle of nosebleed)... on the other hand, an unexplained loss of consciousness by an adult with chest pain didn't concern anyone but me ("it only took a minute before he woke up"). 

So I've tried to explain that I'd like a 1-3 word description.  Busted lip, twisted ankle, fainted, feels dizzy, pinched her finger, seems confused, broke a tooth, etc

But then they just use unhelpful short phrases like "on the ground" (pulseless? Chatting with a friend?)  or "allergies" (seasonal? Or allergic to bees and just stung?).  Or the classic "I don't know but they said you should come." 

Sooooo yeah. They don't distinguish between me running with an AED vs handing Kleenex to someone. It's all COME NOW.   

If someone else knows the magic answer, please share!!

 

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Blue_Moon has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Registered Nurse.

1 Article; 4,926 Visitors; 471 Posts

Oh gosh yes! I get “won’t get up, please hurry!”. Is it because they are unconscious, have a broken leg, sprained ankle, or just refuse? Like I need details. Thankfully nothing too major so far. I was also called out for a teacher “who can’t breathe ”. So I’m like let me grab my AED! Oh no you won’t need that, she’s having a panic attack. Then she is BREATHING!!! I told my staff I need to know what exactly is wrong so I know what to bring and they are trying to do better which I appreciate but it’s still like they have very little clue of what I should be called out for and what’s minor. No matter how much I try to explain they just don’t think like we do. 

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Alex Egan has 9 years experience and works as a Peds PDN.

6 Articles; 22,806 Visitors; 846 Posts

Please state the nature of the medical emergency 

50910037-1043-42BF-A9BE-241164FEE2CD.jpeg

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Eleven011 has 20+ years experience and works as a School Nurse.

14,632 Visitors; 1,104 Posts

On 4/20/2019 at 11:48 PM, Alex Egan said:

Please state the nature of the medical emergency 

50910037-1043-42BF-A9BE-241164FEE2CD.jpeg

This is my favorite post yet!   I SO want to say this when I have kids come and stand at my desk and just stare at me.   But I know it would only get me a confused look.  

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1,934 Visitors; 98 Posts

Or even just the child's name. If you have 40+ inhalers and several epi pens in your office, not to mention diastat for certain individuals, a name can be a great clue.

But yes, a little info goes a long way.

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bluebonnetrn has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN.

5,151 Visitors; 108 Posts

Yes, this. No magic answer either. I have tried for 5 years to emphasize that I just need a little info.
Last week I had a call for the wheelchair. When I got to the classroom it was for a kid who was vomiting in the trash can...

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1,360 Visitors; 291 Posts

19 minutes ago, bluebonnetrn said:


Last week I had a call for the wheelchair. When I got to the classroom it was for a kid who was vomiting in the trash can...

I don't know why I am laughing so hard at this, but here I am 😂

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bluebonnetrn has 18 years experience as a BSN, RN.

5,151 Visitors; 108 Posts

Just now, jess11RN said:

I don't know why I am laughing so hard at this, but here I am 😂

LOL
Well I am glad you are laughing. It *was* funny but in the moment I wasn't laughing! 🤪

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1 Follower; 768 Visitors; 247 Posts

12 minutes ago, jess11RN said:

I don't know why I am laughing so hard at this, but here I am 😂

Vomitus paralysis!!! I hate getting called to those.

My new school is better, I rarely get called away from the clinic. My old school, it was multiple times a day EVERY SINGLE DAY! It was a huge spread out building. It was silly stuff that I never got any info on - just the panicked "we need you NOW."  I literally could not take it anymore it got so bad. Often, there would be no student there on my arrival -"oh, they got better so they went to class or it was taking you too long, we sent them to the clinic." 

I tried to explain it to them on their terms: "Imagine that the principal did not assign you a subject / grade level to teach or a room until the first day of school. You have to show up and figure it all out that morning. Also, you do not get a roster of students - just make your own as they walk through your door." Yep, they still didn't get it!!!

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1,360 Visitors; 291 Posts

41 minutes ago, bluebonnetrn said:

LOL
Well I am glad you are laughing. It *was* funny but in the moment I wasn't laughing! 🤪

No, I wouldn't have been laughing at the time either. Having a mental picture in my head of a teacher so upset and anxious thinking that a student who was vomiting was not capable of walking to the nurse's office just makes me giggle.  

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23,272 Visitors; 2,435 Posts

My favorite is when I get a call that someone is vomiting.

Usually I let a moment of silence fall between me and the person delivering the news, then I say "Okay, great. When they are done, they can come down to see me." Usually the person is kinda dumbfounded at my response.

Because really, what am I supposed to do? Rush up and hold this kid's hair back and embarrass them even further? (Especially since this is MS/HS kids I'm talking about)

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