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What is your take home pay as Nurse Practitioner?

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by hik9258 hik9258 (Member)

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BostonFNP specializes in Adult Internal Medicine, Hospitalist.

1 Follower; 3 Articles; 54,380 Visitors; 5,223 Posts

Much of the "I made more and an RN than an NP" talk is comparing apples to oranges: if you are working night/weekends/overtime as an RN and you make more than an NP working a 40 hour M-F work week than good for you, but its not a salary to salary comparison.

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5,883 Visitors; 219 Posts

True, and many of my FNP friends cite not working holidays/nights/weekends as a main draw. NNPs still work all of those shifts so for me, my personal benchmark was that I was not going to take less than when I was a bedside nurse, especially with the added liability aspect. I'm not comparing the two jobs and coming up with a number.

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evolvingrn specializes in hospice.

8,214 Visitors; 1,035 Posts

No pto (do you get any time off to use that $1500 for CEUs) and 2 weeks pto..... That seems low in both counts.

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5,883 Visitors; 219 Posts

I'm not sure - it's pretty standard for my area so I didn't check further. Right now, the NNPs work 10 days/month with occasional transports at night and it's pretty much "the days off are your days off." If I didn't take this job I'd be driving 2-3 hours to work 24 hour shifts so everything is a trade off.

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evolvingrn specializes in hospice.

8,214 Visitors; 1,035 Posts

Wow. I get 5 weeks to start and 1 week for ceu /1500. That is standard around here... If not on the lower side

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synaptic has 5 years experience.

5,297 Visitors; 249 Posts

I make 500 bucks an hour being awesome

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3,018 Visitors; 37 Posts

I'm working in the LA area and have fellow nurses who are licensed CRNP's still working at bedside nurses in the ICU because they don't like the idea of the huge pay cut they'll take when they take their practitioner job. The medical groups you'll join up with don't care how well your nurses union got you paid as a bedside nurse, it's a whole different ballgame as a salaried CRNP.

Also I know there are a lot of California nurses talking about how they have got great pay in California but I should shed some perspective on that for you. I've lived in The San Fran and the LA area in the past year, you need to earn $130,000 to $150,000 to live somewhat comfortably there with the outrageous cost of living. In the SF area you need $1 million dollars (literally) to buy a crappy 1000 sq foot 3 bedroom home that needs updating. In SoCal you'll need around $500,000 to $600,000 in a cheaper/higher crime neighborhood but your pay is significantly less in SoCal as well.

I've lived and worked from New York/Connecticut down to Atlanta to Tennessee to Texas then all down the coast of California. I love California but don't let these high pay numbers fool you. A nurse making $90,000 a year in 85% of America is probably actually having a better and more luxurious lifestyle than a nurse making $130,000 in many places in California.

I put a lot of thought about the lifestyle costs of working and living in California as an RN in comparison to other places in the country, and here is my quantitative analysis of the costs and benefits of working in Oakland, Califonrnia:

First off, I am working as an RN with 3.5 years experience, base pay 71.25/hr, full benefits; base salary $150,000 a year, but due to overtime, I've already increased my income ceiling to date to about USD180,000 (working an average of 42hrs/a week). Trying to get to $200K (if I can leverage OT and work an average of 45hrs/week)

This is a high cost of living area, but I found a COL calculator by CNN Cost of living: How far will my salary go in another city? - CNNMoney just to see if my pay justifies the COL (Includes an estimate for housing, food, transportation, taxes, etc)

Here's what I found plugging in my region, and base salary of 150,000 (just the base, no overtime included):

My base salary of 150,000 in Oakland, CA is equivalent to:

... Making 178,000/year in brooklyn (Approx $85/hr)

... Making 146,000/year in boston (approx 73/hr)

...Making 103,000/year in Atlanta (approx 51/hr)

... Making 119,000/year in Chicago (approx 60/hr)

... Making 122,000/year in Philidelphia (approx 61/hr)

... Making 111,000/year in Las Vegas (approx 56/hr)

...Making 190,000/year in Honolulu (approx 95/hr)

...Making 115,000/year in Miami (approx 56/hr)

...Making 87,000/year in Memphis (approx 43/hr)

...Making 103,000/year in Charleston (approx 51/hr)

Browsing through the forum in the respective areas above, most RNs don't seem to make the income above in their respective region, with the exception of a few RN's in Las Vegas (correct me if I am wrong please, I'm always curious about pay updates in other parts of the country)

The above may not always be true for all individuals, as COL may vary based on personal spending habits, but generally speaking, somebody living a middle class lifestyle should expect the COL estimates above.

In summary, living and working in my part of California is generally more profitable than most (if not all other) parts of the country.

In practice, I'm finding the above to be true, as I am able to substantially save up to 50% of my after tax take home pay. What does this all mean?

I might have to pay more up front to live in Oakland, CA area with a slightly higher COL than many parts of our country, but the pay here outpaces the cost of living in comparison to what other RNs are paid elsewhere.

As an added benefit, although owning a home costs more, the resale value of a home in this area is relatively stable. In the long run, even if I have to pay more for a house, the home will be worth even more when I sell it, leaving me more money for retirement and/or the option to roll it over to an even larger/grandious home elsewhere in the country.

Lastly, you can't beat the weather.

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3,915 Visitors; 163 Posts

New Grad accepted a Cardiac Thoracic Surgery NP position in LA, 3 12's (1 weekend/month). Salary 127,500/year, 7 hr PTO/pay period, 1 week CEU, $2,000 for educational expenses. Hospital pays for RN, NP, NPI, and DEA. This is the same unit & hospital I work as a RN for 5 years.

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1,440 Visitors; 64 Posts

Wow that is really good. I'm looking to move to LA soon, can I PM to ask some questions ?

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Wolf at the Door has 7 years experience.

19,203 Visitors; 1,036 Posts

Central and NorCal you come out way ahead vs So Cal. Its really simple to figure it out.

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1,062 Visitors; 45 Posts

Hi everyone - I am not an NNP yet but graduating in a few weeks so I thought I'd give my two cents. I have 2 offers currently - one for $98K, no PTO, good insurance, $1500 yr/CEUs. The larger metropolitan-area job was starting at around $110K-115k with 2 weeks PTO, same on everything else. To sweetether - I would assume that in So. Cal. you could hit that mark, especially considering that the strong nurses' union pushes salary up for nurses overall and you would be able to say you didn't want to make less than what you would make as a bedside nurse. I could possibly get info on Texas for you - I have a friend graduating in that area of the country.

Hi RNkaytee,

Thanks for the info! Do you mind saying what metropolitan area you are referring to? Are those paid positions you mentioned day shift? The first job is for 10 shifts a month? How many hours on each shift? Is there a lot of competition for new grad NNP jobs in your area?

Thanks!

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Bluebolt has 6 years experience.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 25,472 Visitors; 557 Posts

I put a lot of thought about the lifestyle costs of working and living in California as an RN in comparison to other places in the country, and here is my quantitative analysis of the costs and benefits of working in Oakland, Califonrnia:

First off, I am working as an RN with 3.5 years experience, base pay 71.25/hr, full benefits; base salary $150,000 a year, but due to overtime, I've already increased my income ceiling to date to about USD180,000 (working an average of 42hrs/a week). Trying to get to $200K (if I can leverage OT and work an average of 45hrs/week)

This is a high cost of living area, but I found a COL calculator by CNN Cost of living: How far will my salary go in another city? - CNNMoney just to see if my pay justifies the COL (Includes an estimate for housing, food, transportation, taxes, etc)

Here's what I found plugging in my region, and base salary of 150,000 (just the base, no overtime included):

My base salary of 150,000 in Oakland, CA is equivalent to:

... Making 178,000/year in brooklyn (Approx $85/hr)

... Making 146,000/year in boston (approx 73/hr)

...Making 103,000/year in Atlanta (approx 51/hr)

... Making 119,000/year in Chicago (approx 60/hr)

... Making 122,000/year in Philidelphia (approx 61/hr)

... Making 111,000/year in Las Vegas (approx 56/hr)

...Making 190,000/year in Honolulu (approx 95/hr)

...Making 115,000/year in Miami (approx 56/hr)

...Making 87,000/year in Memphis (approx 43/hr)

...Making 103,000/year in Charleston (approx 51/hr)

Browsing through the forum in the respective areas above, most RNs don't seem to make the income above in their respective region, with the exception of a few RN's in Las Vegas (correct me if I am wrong please, I'm always curious about pay updates in other parts of the country)

The above may not always be true for all individuals, as COL may vary based on personal spending habits, but generally speaking, somebody living a middle class lifestyle should expect the COL estimates above.

In summary, living and working in my part of California is generally more profitable than most (if not all other) parts of the country.

In practice, I'm finding the above to be true, as I am able to substantially save up to 50% of my after tax take home pay. What does this all mean?

I might have to pay more up front to live in Oakland, CA area with a slightly higher COL than many parts of our country, but the pay here outpaces the cost of living in comparison to what other RNs are paid elsewhere.

As an added benefit, although owning a home costs more, the resale value of a home in this area is relatively stable. In the long run, even if I have to pay more for a house, the home will be worth even more when I sell it, leaving me more money for retirement and/or the option to roll it over to an even larger/grandious home elsewhere in the country.

Lastly, you can't beat the weather.

Yeah but you forgot the most important part of that, you'd have to live in Oakland. lol.

When I worked at Stanford in Palo Alto people talked about Oakland as in "stab city" and I constantly got recruiters asking me to work 48hr a week contracts paying over $3,000. A traveler friend of mine brought his kid to that assignment and he had to cancel it and leave because his teenage girl didn't feel safe in the town. The cost of living is at least a lot cheaper than San Fran in Oakland so your $150K a year would take you farther.

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