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What should I do Rn or LPN?

Pre-Nursing   (2,434 Views 13 Comments)
by dewers90 dewers90 (New Member) New Member

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So I have been a aide for three years and currently working at a ltc facility. I love my job so much I've decided to go to school for nursing. My question is should I go for my lpn or Rn?

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

4,111 Posts; 29,292 Profile Views

So I have been a aide for three years and currently working at a ltc facility. I love my job so much I've decided to go to school for nursing. My question is should I go for my lpn or Rn?

Well, I know two whole sentences worth of information about you, so it's hard to say. Have you done any research regarding the requirements for each kind of program? ...the costs? ...the marketability of each degree in your region?

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426 Posts; 14,364 Profile Views

It depends on how long you are committed to go to school and your money and living situation. However, you will have many more opportunities as an RN.

I went through a full time LPN program that lasted 1 year. It was intense because everything is compressed. It was 5 days a week. It was hard for many students in the class to continue working at their other jobs once we were about 6 months into the program. It was tough because we would go over information and often be tested on it a few days later. It also required an 80 or above. Below an 80 was considered failing.

I later went through a LPN-BSN program. Compared to the LPN program, in the BSN program we dug deeper into every subject and had more time to learn it. I learned a tremendous amount of information in my BSN program that was never mentioned in the LPN program. Going through a Associates or Bachelor's degree program is a big committment that lasts several years. Also, if I want to go on to grad school I can go anytime with my BSN.

I am glad that I became an LPN then later an RN. However, I always wanted to work in a hospital with really sick patients. That is something I could never do as an LPN.

What do you want to do as a nurse?

As an LPN your opportunities are limited and the pay is less.

As an RN your opportunites are endless and the pay is better.

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BabyFood26 has 4 years experience and specializes in Home Health, Mental/Behavioral Health.

203 Posts; 5,465 Profile Views

What is your support system like?

How comfortable are you with your current income? If it suits you and you have the time and/or support, I'd say go straight for your RN credentials.

I personally went to LPN school first because I was desperate to make better income being that the waiting list for the RN program was a 3 year wait.

I was young with kids. Both me and my husband made embarrassingly low wages. Even with both of us working full time, renting a one bedroom apartment, living on our own in CA was a constant financial struggle. Eventually he got a better job and it got a little easier for us, but I was still set on achieving my goal of becoming a licensed nurse.

Not wanting to be stuck at my minimum wage job anymore, I hastily joined the LPN program so I could gain better employment quicker, and just be able to at least get my feet wet in the nursing field.

I'm now about to begin my pre reqs for the RN program at the local community college. I would have honestly gone straight for my RN if I could have.

Some people I know are completely content with making LPN their final frontier. It's what suits them. Most of them love what they do for a living. On the other hand, some of these people have kids, little support to continue their education while working or are just not fond of the idea of returning to school to be honest.

There's so many factors, really, to why you might want to choose one over the other. Or for what reason you might choose to go from LPN to RN instead of directly to RN.

What do you want out of your future career in nursing?

Is the money important?

Is it a longing to be certified to perform a wider array of skilled techniques?

I'd love to hear more from you. Let me know !

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lindseylpn has 12 years experience.

420 Posts; 8,334 Profile Views

If you have the time I'd go for your RN but, you can base your choice on many factors.

-What's the job market like for LPNs or RNs in your area? In some areas LPNs aren't utilized as much.

-What is the LPN scope of practice in your state? In some states scope is more limited than others.

-How much time do you want to devote to school? LPN school is usually 1 year but, typically Mon-Fri 40ish hours per week in a full time program. RN is 2 years plus prerequisites but, a lot are less hours per week than an LPN program. Or there is the option to get your LPN and then transfer to an RN if that's your ultimate goal.

-What are the wait lists like for you local programs?

-Are you wanting to stay with your current employer? Do they hire more LPNs or RNs?

-Financing school and salary: RNs make more but, school will probably be more expensive. LPN school may be more affordable but, some vocational schools don't take student loans if you need to go that route.

Ultimately the decision is yours and there are many deciding factors, either is a good choice. Good luck.

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2 Posts; 337 Profile Views

Thank you all for the wonderful insight. As far as time I have plenty of it for the most part. Being only in my mid 20s and not having any children. And my support is awesome my family is behind me 100 percent and so is my fiancé. I really would like to stay in long term care I just love it and caring for the elderly. Is there anyway I specialize in that? Oh and I've talked with my employer and they said they would be help me pay for my schooling. But I would have to sign a contract with them saying I will stay for a year after I'm done. What is your experience with contracts? Good? Bad?

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 316,462 Profile Views

I would have to sign a contract with them saying I will stay for a year after I'm done. What is your experience with contracts? Good? Bad?
In your case, you already like your workplace. Therefore, sticking around another year to fulfill a contractual obligation should not be too bad.

I started as an LPN and slowly stair-stepped my way to the ASN degree, RN license, and BSN degree. Since I was a nontraditional student, I did not have the liberty or support to immediately pursue the RN license.

However, I generally concur with the previous respondents. The RN license will open the doors to more opportunities and better pay, but the LPN license can also lead to a solid career. Good luck with whatever decision you make.

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923 Posts; 14,301 Profile Views

I rather do an LPN program. The State ran a program for $15,000. Then can apply for 2nd year nursing school at the Community College. Our State did away with the program and only for profit schools offer LPN training for $30,000. For that money I can go achieve my BSN or bit cheaper my associates degree.

Have to research and figure out what will work the best.

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CaffeinePOQ4HPRN has 10 years experience as a BSN, LPN, RN.

352 Posts; 10,016 Profile Views

So I have been a aide for three years and currently working at a ltc facility. I love my job so much I've decided to go to school for nursing. My question is should I go for my lpn or Rn?

Please!!! For the love of god!!! Go and get your RN, forget about the LPN route. This is coming from a Registered Practical Nurse (aka RPN/ LPN).

Please, just trust me and do the RN from the get-go!

P.S. you're welcome to PM me if you want me to elaborate on my answer.

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sophBSN15 has 4 years experience.

26 Posts; 1,546 Profile Views

I would say go for the RN, if you don't have real responsibilities. I went to a LPN program first before getting my RN. I had no children and was still living with my parents, I wish I would have gone straight through, probably would be a NP by now. I have been an RN for 4 years and a nurse in general for 7. Don't waste anytime. RN =more money, responsibilities, more doors opening up. Oh yeah also get a BSN vs ASN,seems that's where all employment is going.Hopefully that helps.

Edited by sophBSN15
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AtLeastMyDogLovesMe has 3 years experience.

41 Posts; 855 Profile Views

So I have been a aide for three years and currently working at a ltc facility. I love my job so much I've decided to go to school for nursing. My question is should I go for my lpn or Rn?

I am not sure why anyone would go LPN unless for some other reason they had no choice. That is absolutely no disrespect to LPNs - as someone already stated there are way more opportunities with your RN. No one ever said you HAD to work in the hospital with your RN. The unfortunate thing is LPNs often struggle to get employment anywhere else but LTC in some regions which is why it sounds like you're under the impression that you need one to stay in LTC. You can do the job with either. Apply for both and see what happens.

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