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What has happened to nursing?

Nurses   (4,152 Views | 11 Replies)
by mandm336 mandm336 (New) New

456 Profile Views; 2 Posts

I suppose this will be a rant of sorts, but I became a nurse because I really did want to help people. Now I find that politics and rules and more and more regulations keep getting in the way. Perhaps I should have been born in Florence Nightengales time period were nursing really was about helping the patient in the best way possible. Not that I have anything against good rules etc. but it seems that HIPPA just gets more and more obtuse. After reading some other posts it seems crazy to me that you are unable to call a patient to see how they are doing even after they left your floor or unit. I understand the need for these rules to some degree but since when has the phrase CYA become all consuming? No one seems to understand that it is possible to make an honest mistake anymore and I am seriously considering leaving the profession because of this.

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my_purpose specializes in med surge.

106 Posts; 4,724 Profile Views

Wow! When I read the title I thought the post would be about the attitudes and personalities of the nurses and not the profession. All I can say is if you LOVE nursing, try to understand the rules and regulations. They make sense and are put in place to protect us all. Think of it that way. I have just finished my pre-reqs (with all A's I might say) and I can't image going through all of it to just walk away. Find that thing that you love and always let that be your motivation. Maybe try a different unit or maybe even a different hospital, but whatever you do, stick with it and keep your head up.

Stay Strong.

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1 Article; 1,905 Posts; 15,994 Profile Views

Nursing in the time of old Flo was pretty miserable IMHO. In addition, Flo was very good at politics, working the system and getting her way. In many ways, we are now better off due to the work of the old school nurses.

My_Puropse, I appreciate your enthusiasm; however, you may look at these concepts with a very different set of eyes when you actually become a nurse and experience the chaos that is our current health care system.

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203 Posts; 6,884 Profile Views

All I can say is if you LOVE nursing, try to understand the rules and regulations. They make sense and are put in place to protect us all.

:grn:

Edited by TheCommuter
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my_purpose specializes in med surge.

106 Posts; 4,724 Profile Views

I know, it will probably change once I get there. But I came from the banking industry and hated it with a capital H due to some of the same things that she spoke about. So, this time around, I found something that I love and I want to teach myself to have a different outlook and remember what and why I would be there. But, don't get me wrong, I truly understand.

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rn-jane has 12 years experience and specializes in ccu cardiovascular.

417 Posts; 6,986 Profile Views

The rules are out there to protect us, patients and family members of our patients. People have a right to privacy and we as nurses and care givers have to respect the privacy and know there is a line we cannot cross. It's one thing I think if you work for a doctors office in a small town and you wonder how a patient is doing. For years in our profession peoples rights were violated and abused. I can't tell you how many times as a nurse a well seeminly neighbor, church member wanted to know about a patient. For the most part most are not happy with"They are stable and are doing fine" They want to know all the test results and will grill the nurse to no end. I sometimes think family members do it on purpose in our area "Lets see who we can sue" Just realize these laws are here for a reason and I prefer they are there to protect everyone.

A person has a right to come in to the hospital when they perhaps are having the worst day of their life and not have to worry about a nosy boss wondering if they need to be replaced. Believe me it happens!

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pebbles has 17 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Trauma acute surgery, surgical ICU, PACU.

490 Posts; 7,746 Profile Views

Florence Nightingale faced some pretty stiff opposition to some of the changes that she tried to bring about to cleanliness and lifestyle in improving the outcomes of soldiers. And that's just what's known and documented about her life. Never mind the fact that she tried to bring about change and she was a women with little or no power! There was a LOT of politics and rules that had to be done and gotten around so nurses could do their jobs back then - and in any age. It's life.

I think the disillusionment hits us all sooner or later. It does suck that all this politics affects the patient care. But you know what, it always did. People who are good nurses will be able to see through all that, deal with the politics in time and still be able to reach patients and take care of them. It's hard in the first year or so. But don't lose heart. Once you find better ways of dealing with "the politics", you'll find your groove again with the patients. :)

Don't romanticize the past - the past was way worse than you imagine.

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*LadyJane* has 4 years experience and specializes in LTC, wound care.

278 Posts; 9,610 Profile Views

The nurses in the doctor's office take over once the patient leaves the hospital and they have their follow up appointment with their primary care provider. We call them and keep in touch, remind them about tests, and inform them about their lab results and meds. We actually get to know them pretty well, so you might consider nursing in the ambulatory care setting. If you work for a nice doc like I do, it's a pretty nice job! (No eves or weekends or holidays, either!):nurse:

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621 Posts; 5,527 Profile Views

to the op, i'd really like to know what profession you think isn't controlled by a boat load of rules, regs, law, etc.?

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Zookeeper3 has 17 years experience and specializes in ICU, ER, EP,.

1,361 Posts; 11,148 Profile Views

The rules and regulations are overwhelming and do hinder our care at times. You will learn to take the moments that you can to teach, listen and make a difference.

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Tait has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Acute Care Cardiac, Education, Pain and Spine.

6 Articles; 2,093 Posts; 28,642 Profile Views

A patient asked me the other day what kept me in nursing. I told him it was the patients. Despite the bickering between staff, the mountains of paperwork and the lack of night nurse love, when I walk in a room and a patient looks at me with a genuine sigh of relief to see me with their pain/nausea etc medication, or just to help them clean up and feel better it is what gets me. It is what keeps me from being a barista at Starbucks until I can complete my MSN.

When I was in the ER yesterday for dehydration I was so appreciative of my nurses, techs and docs for taking such good care of me.

Sometimes you just have to find something within the mess to love, when the rest of it you could do without.

Tait

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2 Posts; 456 Profile Views

Thanks to everyone who understands what has happened to me. I do love nursing and need to focus on that and find my niche. A little frustrating after being a nurse for 5 years. I do understand that the rules do protect us as well, don't get me wrong. Oh well, onward and upward. I actually have just registered to go back to school to get my BS and then Masters in Education - so perhaps that is my direction..this is a good site!

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