What is better? 2nd or 3rd shift as a nurse in prison??

Posted
by hnt1987 hnt1987 Member

What is better? 2nd or 3rd shift as a working nurse in prison??

Della Lee

Della Lee

2 Posts

Is it a federal or state prison?

I work at a federal prison. I started on night shift for about 3 years. It was a good intro to the correctional scene. I then worked second shift for 1 year but now am on day shift. If you have never worked corrections you will need to have an introduction slowly. It is a whole different world working corrections when you accustomed to working in a hospital or "free world" clinic.

hnt1987

hnt1987

107 Posts

state prison, sort of like a local county jail which held about 900 inmates. What u think??

ImThatGuy, BSN, RN

2,139 Posts

Anywhere in life when you work the funky 8's it's never good.

Della Lee

Della Lee

2 Posts

There are a lot of factors for a county jail. Looking at the possibility of intakes. At a jail you get a lot of intakes (admissions) from arrests, etc. Depending on what the activity is in your area, the evening and night is pretty active. Day time you will deal with routine stuff like a clinic. Find out more details on that part. If it is a settled state prison (like they have gone to court already and serving their sentence) it is on a more regular schedule.

ImThatGuy, BSN, RN

2,139 Posts

From a patrol perspective (thus your intake in a jail) the 1400-2200 hour shift was always busiest for me. I'd get to work at 2pm, be in the car by 2:10 and taking calls until 10:30, lol.

NewGradRN10

NewGradRN10

21 Posts

bump...

Is it easier to start on the night shift? Is it slower? Like a 22:00 - 0600 ? Do you actually pass meds at these hours? Most importantly, is there more than one nurse in a prison with 3,500 inmates during the night shift? How many nurses are there?

Thirdwatch

Thirdwatch

157 Posts

Third shift. Less drama, less work. There's not much to do at night shift.

sadie252

sadie252

15 Posts

I work 3rd shift at a state prison. I am the only nurse there. We have about 2400 inmates. I am so busy I can't see straight most nights. We have lots of assaults, shortness or breath, chest pain, and sports injuries that never get reported until night shift for some odd reason. I have patient's housed in the infirmary as well. I have to do assessments on them, and I have to do day shift's assessments because they are "too busy." I also have to pass day shift's morning meds in the infirmary and pull and pass meds for the entire seg unit. I also have to prepare releases, transfers, out to courts, and stock. I am also assigned audits. We recently switched to computer charting. I have to go through old charts and key in medical history. I have to assist with morning insulin. Last week I had 6 patient's in the infirmary that required Qshift assessments. Two of them were on IV fluid. I had one patient with an extensive dressing change. There's stuff I am forgeting, but you get the point.

Edited by sadie252

Blue Crab Lover

Blue Crab Lover

49 Posts

@Sadie, I am tired just from reading your post. You should look for another job. That sounds worse than working in an acute care hospital. Whoa!!!

What is better? 2nd or 3rd shift as a working nurse in prison??

The answer depends on you, your needs, your family, etc.

What are you looking for? Sleep? Learning? Excitement at work? Time to read or do crossword puzzles?

Nights might have emergencies, lines of inmates going to court who need their meds before leaving very early, might receive inmates and their charts coming in from other facilities/municipalities.

Sometimes staff get hurt or become ill and you could have to respond to them.

Charts must be reviewed for meds and medical problems.

Newly arrested people must be checked by nurse for injuries, illnesses, history, etc.

You might have an inpatient infirmary or hospital ward with IV's, etc.

Probably 0500 accuchecks, too.

Evening shift is busy, too, with a couple of med passes thrown in, possibly medical emergencies involving visitors.

Good luck deciding and getting the shift that's best for you and your patients.

Edited by Kooky Korky