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What is Abandonment?

Professionalism   (2,617 Views | 17 Replies)

1,398 Profile Views; 31 Posts

Is being a No Show / No Call abandonment? If a nurse simply fails to show up to work for a period of time?

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7 Followers; 3,453 Posts; 24,431 Profile Views

No

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NICU Guy has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

1 Follower; 3,573 Posts; 32,607 Profile Views

You must be at work and take responsibility for a patient. No call/no show and not coming to work on your day off can not be patient abandonment.

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1 Follower; 307 Posts; 2,119 Profile Views

That may be job abandonment, a fireable offense, but not patient abandonment which is reportable to the BON.

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ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

4 Followers; 2,757 Posts; 11,355 Profile Views

You have to have assumed care in order to abandon a patient. If you don't take assignment you cannot abandon a patient. Although I've heard managers use the term "abandonment" to mean something different. Your BON will have a full definition.

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

4 Followers; 1,776 Posts; 3,728 Profile Views

It can be classified as job abandonment for unemployment purposes (depends on state) and can be any job(not just nursing). Patient abandonment is a totally different bird and your BoN can give exact definition 

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Persephone Paige has 15 years experience as a ADN.

4 Followers; 1 Article; 696 Posts; 4,042 Profile Views

Job abandonment, yes. Patient abandonment doesn't happen until you've taken report from offgoing shift and then leave your patients with no one to care for them. At least that's my understanding

 

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Molemedic has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Trauma.

80 Posts; 2,254 Profile Views

Not coming to work is not considered patient abandonment although some employers like to threaten as if it is. 

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Megan1977 has 37 years experience as a MSN, EdD, RN and specializes in Medical policy: nurse educator: case mgt.

94 Posts; 852 Profile Views

It is not patient abandonment because you never assumed care of the patient(s) so the BRN won’t get involved, no matter what your employer threatened. You can be disciplined or fired by your employer for job abandonment with a no call/no show. Two different conditions entirely. 

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LilPeanut has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in NICU/Neonatal transport.

898 Posts; 5,601 Profile Views

The only exception in very rare cases is if it was an unofficial walk out or sick out, which are illegal and considered patient abandonment because you are not allowed to strike if it would endanger patients. People would be legally mandated to work. I say unofficial, because a union knows it is not allowed to do this and all strikes have to be done with enough notice to the hospital to be able to find other nurses to work.

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3 Followers; 4,617 Posts; 36,021 Profile Views

Makes striking pretty ineffective, I would think. 

but abandonment  -   Check with an attorney or 2 in your state for accuracy, just to be totally sure

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LilPeanut has 8 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in NICU/Neonatal transport.

898 Posts; 5,601 Profile Views

11 hours ago, Kooky Korky said:

Makes striking pretty ineffective, I would think. 

but abandonment  -   Check with an attorney or 2 in your state for accuracy, just to be totally sure

It is still effective and costs the hospital a lot of money and hassle. To walk out without having anyone to care for critical patients is essentially killing them.

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