Jump to content

Want your opinion- which NP program would you choose?

NP Students   (1,385 Views | 7 Replies)

Kyla RN has 6 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Research, Neurology.

1,241 Profile Views; 27 Posts

Hi, I'm curious to hear people's input. I am currently researching NP programs with the goal of starting late next year (so I have some time). I'm looking at several programs within my region and 2 stand out- I've listed the pros and cons of the 2 below.

Here's some context: I'm in my late 20s. I have to do an online or hybrid program, and will have to continue working throughout the program. I also cannot move (mortgage, boyfriend). My employer is very flexible and supportive of my desire to pursue grad school. I am indifferent to MSN vs DNP at the moment. I'm more focused on quality of program, how flexible they are with working students, and price. I would also prefer to work with adults, but I know I can still do that with an FNP. 

Option 1: an MSN AGNP online program in the next state over at a well-known brick & mortar university. 3 years long, part-time (but they say full-time work load). Requires a week-long summer on-campus immersion once per year for hands on skills (I want this- I didn't want a 100% online program). I know someone who recently graduated- she recommended the program, but did warn me that it's very "self- learning"- more textbook education and less lecture focused. They have a 100% pass rate for boards. But, you are on your own for finding clinical placements in your hometown- my ex colleague said this was an extremely stressful experience in the city we live in. Price is about what I expected. But that's not factoring in the flights and room & board for the 3 week-long immersions.

Option 2: a DNP FNP hybrid program at a locally well-known brick & mortar university. 3 years long, full-time. Monthly weekend immersions on campus. I know this school of nursing well- I got my BSN here and really enjoyed it, very good quality BSN program. They handle clinical placements for you (HUGE plus). Price....not cheap. Almost double the other program. However, I still can't shake this program off yet. Through my BSN, I realized that I really value having classmates for studying, bouncing ideas off each other, and supporting one another. And I like the idea of having more access to my professors. I am attending an info session soon where I'll ask about board pass rate, I expect it to be high. 

After writing this all out, I realized that I may be trying to justify paying a lot more money for a more traditional brick & mortar experience in a familiar environment, plus the advantage of not dealing with clinical placements. I'm hoping someone from a hybrid program will also see this thread and give me their input. If you were in my shoes, which program do you think you'd lean towards?

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

saniesen has 4 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg.

2 Posts; 31 Profile Views

Can I ask what colleges these are? I am also researching and I am having a tough time choosing. I say, go with your gut!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kyla RN has 6 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Research, Neurology.

27 Posts; 1,241 Profile Views

15 hours ago, saniesen said:

Can I ask what colleges these are? I am also researching and I am having a tough time choosing. I say, go with your gut!

Hey Saniesen- Sure, they are Boise State (MSN AGNP) and University of Portland (DNP FNP).  l live in Portland, OR. Thanks for your input! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

618 Posts; 10,993 Profile Views

I did not go to a hybrid program but a distance program that required me to go on campus every year for several days. Knowing what I know now, I wish I went to a hybrid program. While I did enjoy the ability to take my classes and do my homework almost any time I wanted, I really feel like I missed the opportunity to get to know my classmates and form connections/networking opportunities. Additionally, having your program find your clinical placements is a HUGE PLUS. Finding clinical placements is a real pain!

Having said that, I received an MSN, not a DNP. I was initially in a BSN-DNP program but then realized I had ZERO desire to take classes like Knowledge Management in Nursing or Organizational Concepts in Nursing so dropped out. I think you have to really want to get knee-deep into nursing to pursue a DNP, and I'm not that hugely interested in getting that knee-deep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FullGlass has 2 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

8 Followers; 2 Articles; 1,075 Posts; 10,337 Profile Views

It is pretty clear which program you prefer.  Before agonizing over the price, fill out a FAFSA and apply to a few programs.  See what kind of financial aid is offered - you may be pleasantly surprised.

There are Nurse Corps Scholarships which are full ride and offer a living stipend in return for working in underserved area or population.  Many states also have similar scholarships for their residents.  There are also loan repayment programs at the federal and state level.  Some employers also offer loan repayment.  You have to apply for these program separate from the FAFSA.

There are also many other scholarships available and you can do a google search to research these.

Many schools offer work study.  These are part time jobs, usually pretty easy, that will at least provide some pocket money and many of them have ample time to study while working.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kyla RN has 6 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Research, Neurology.

27 Posts; 1,241 Profile Views

11 hours ago, db2xs said:

I did not go to a hybrid program but a distance program that required me to go on campus every year for several days. Knowing what I know now, I wish I went to a hybrid program. While I did enjoy the ability to take my classes and do my homework almost any time I wanted, I really feel like I missed the opportunity to get to know my classmates and form connections/networking opportunities. Additionally, having your program find your clinical placements is a HUGE PLUS. Finding clinical placements is a real pain!

Having said that, I received an MSN, not a DNP. I was initially in a BSN-DNP program but then realized I had ZERO desire to take classes like Knowledge Management in Nursing or Organizational Concepts in Nursing so dropped out. I think you have to really want to get knee-deep into nursing to pursue a DNP, and I'm not that hugely interested in getting that knee-deep.

Thanks for your feedback! 

11 hours ago, FullGlass said:

It is pretty clear which program you prefer.  Before agonizing over the price, fill out a FAFSA and apply to a few programs.  See what kind of financial aid is offered - you may be pleasantly surprised.

There are Nurse Corps scholarships which are full ride and offer a living stipend in return for working in underserved area or population.  Many states also have similar scholarships for their residents.  There are also loan repayment programs at the federal and state level.  Some employers also offer loan repayment.  You have to apply for these program separate from the FAFSA.

There are also many other scholarships available and you can do a google search to research these.

Many schools offer work study.  These are part time jobs, usually pretty easy, that will at least provide some pocket money and many of them have ample time to study while working.

 

Right...I honestly thought I was weighing the 2 evenly until I read what  I was writing. I will definitely look into any and all forms of financial support. I appreciate your feedback!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SopranoKris has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

3,086 Posts; 33,124 Profile Views

As a current student who just barely found an OB/Gyn clinical rotation in time, I can't stress enough what a huge stress relief it is not to have to find your own clinical placements. It's worth its weight in gold! If the school near me which provides clinical placement did acute care NP, I would have gone there and paid the higher price. Like FullGlass said above, submit your FAFSA and see just how much they'll cover so you know what you're look at in terms of debt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kyla RN has 6 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Research, Neurology.

27 Posts; 1,241 Profile Views

30 minutes ago, SopranoKris said:

As a current student who just barely found an OB/Gyn clinical rotation in time, I can't stress enough what a huge stress relief it is not to have to find your own clinical placements. It's worth its weight in gold! If the school near me which provides clinical placement did acute care NP, I would have gone there and paid the higher price. Like FullGlass said above, submit your FAFSA and see just how much they'll cover so you know what you're look at in terms of debt.

I really appreciate your feedback! Thank you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.