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Veterinary nurse

Pre-Nursing   (12,661 Views 12 Comments)
by kasia2 kasia2 (Member)

2,735 Profile Views; 199 Posts

I wonder if there are nurses who specialize in veterinary field and how much they make?

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aerorunner80 has 8 years experience and specializes in NICU.

581 Posts; 13,499 Profile Views

You may want to go ask that question in a veterinary board. They are two totally different things (veterinary medicine and human medicine). Vet techs/assistants are often referred to as Vet Nurses.

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EricJRN has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

6,663 Posts; 27,699 Profile Views

The UK and Australia, I believe, have positions for veterinary nurses, but it's a different training program than the kind of nursing we discuss here. Had a long thread a few months back about US veterinary technicians/assistants who referred to themselves as nurses.

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MikeyJ is a RN and specializes in Peds, PICU, Home health, Dialysis.

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Vet "nurses" are called Vet Techs, and they make substantially lower wages than nurses. I know a friend from high school went on to become a vet tech (I think it is a 2 year program) and she makes around $15 an hour.

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ohmeowzer RN is a RN and specializes in ob/gyn med /surg.

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i asked a vet that . beacuse i love cats... the vet told me there were no nurses for vets only the techs.. i asked why ? he told me animals don't have money ( which i believe because my cats are broke) .. and vets are the lowest paid doctors because animals don't have any money and can't get jobs.... i would love to be a vet nurse ..

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MikeyJ is a RN and specializes in Peds, PICU, Home health, Dialysis.

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I kind of feel bad for vets because they put in 8 years of school (4 years of undergrad + 4 years of vet school) which is similar to an MD/DO. Although, most vet's do not complete a "residency", although many do. And then they walk out and make roughly $50 - $80K a year -- sometimes more depending on location and type of practice. However, that is a far cry from what an MD/DO makes, or even what nurses make!

But as the above poster said, it comes down to the economics. It isn't realistic to charge pet owners the same amount that we charge human's and their insurance company.

We have a friend of the family who runs a mobile vet clinic in Upper Michigan and makes very very good money. However, she not only deals with small domesticated animals, but also deals with livestock, cattle, horses, etc.

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It is an AA degree with pre-reqs that are identical to the ADN programs. Sadly Vet Techs make a fraction of what we get paid despite doing the entire job from check in, labs, pre/post op etc. Hopefully as time goes on and the veterinary specialities continue to grow they will start paying living wages for vet technicians. I have taken both nursing courses and vet tech courses and the vet tech exams were way more difficult!

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MikeyJ is a RN and specializes in Peds, PICU, Home health, Dialysis.

1,124 Posts; 9,285 Profile Views

It is an AA degree with pre-reqs that are identical to the ADN programs. Sadly Vet Techs make a fraction of what we get paid despite doing the entire job from check in, labs, pre/post op etc. Hopefully as time goes on and the veterinary specialities continue to grow they will start paying living wages for vet technicians. I have taken both nursing courses and vet tech courses and the vet tech exams were way more difficult!

I highly doubt Vet Tech wages will ever rise significantly. It has everything to do with the fact that there is very little money coming into a vet clinic compared to a physicians clinic or hospital. Like I mentioned in my last post, vet's cannot charge the same amount as a physician would because it would be impossible for pet owners to afford that type of out-of-pocket expenses, considering pet insurance hasn't proved to be a worthwhile endeavour.

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al7139 has 5 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Emergency.

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Yes there are. Like RN's, they are responsible for all aspects of care, and liable for their actions. I spent 16 years in vet med, and saw many changes to the practice standards, just as in registered nursing. They perform the same (and sometimes beyond!) duties RN's do, but are paid a fraction of the salary. LVT's can do lots of tasks that RN's are restricted from doing without specialized training. I am very glad that I made the change to "human" medicine! I just graduated nursing school, and am looking forward to working in a better regulated (in vet med, you don't need a license or degree in some states!) field, and getting paid more (although money isn't everything) for my skills and education!

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Quifilly specializes in Veterinary.

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Hiya

I'm a Listed Veterinary Nurse (VN) from the UK, so I can only really comment on what wages UK nurses are on.

The BVNA (British Veterinary Nursing Association) carried out a salary survey last year and found that the average VN gets paid approx. £16,000 per year (US $31,510.39).

However that figure does vary on location. I live in the South West of England, which is generally considered a not-well-off area, have been a qualified and listed VN for 3.5 years, and get paid £14,000 per year (US $27,571.59). I have worked in the same practice for almost 9 years!

In the London area, the average VN wage (looking at job ads) appears to be between £18-20,000 (usually including London Weighting allowance).

UK RGNs are on a higher wage than VNs, but I expect that that is the same in the USA. A newly qualified RGN here, usually starts on around £21,000 (US $41,357.39).

Hope that helps! What is the average wage for Veterinary Technicians in the USA anyways?

Kirsty :D

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199 Posts; 2,735 Profile Views

Thanks for the reply and info,I would like to be veterinary nurse, actually both but you have to ufortunately choose one, because like someone else stated in the thread, there is different pharmacology for the animals as well the anatomy, but I do envy a bit veterinary nurses cause I love animals all kind:) Also money is not the most important factor in choosing your career.

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