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Unit manager as first job?

First Year   (2,066 Views | 10 Replies)
by vm156 vm156 (New) New

646 Profile Views; 12 Posts

I am going on an interview for the job of unit manager on a skilled nursing floor of an extended care facility. They are aware that I am a newly licensed graduate nurse with no experience outside of school. My question is this: How does everyone feel about the job not only being my first, but also being a "Unit Manager" job? I know that the first year on the job is brutal for everyone. I don't want to pass up a great opportunity, but I also don't want to shoot myself in the foot and take a job that may potentially be so overwhelming from the addition of a management title on top of learning the art of nursing. I value your opinions! Thanks :)

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BriRN specializes in Cardio/Pulmonary.

44 Posts; 2,808 Profile Views

yikes, i think it'd be hard to be in a management position if you'd never been in the shoes of the people you will be managing

It's your call, but If i were in your shoes, id try really hard to find a staff rn position for your first job! :)

Good luck!!

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Meriwhen is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

2 Followers; 4 Articles; 7,907 Posts; 60,006 Profile Views

You have no nursing experience outside of school and they still want to interview you for a unit nursing manager position? This is no slur upon you, but something about this scenario screams "Big Red Flag!" to me.

I would be extremely cautious about this position because it sounds like you may be getting in over your head...and should something happen, the BON doesn't have a lot of sympathy for new grads who willingly got themselves in over their heads.

If it were me, I wouldn't do it. Too risky. But I'm not you...I agree with BriRN: I'd try to find a staff position and build up your skills first before attempting to manage a unit.

Best of luck whatever you decide!

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12 Posts; 646 Profile Views

Thanks for your reply! I actually had applied and interviewed for another position at the same facility, and was called back to interview for this position. I can't help but feel like it may be too much of a leap for my first job. I would like to start as a staff RN. An ECF wasn't really on my list of dream jobs, but there doesn't seem to be much hiring going on in the Detroit area. The facility is a 5 star ECF and has been on the local news a few times for it's outstanding excellence in care. I did pick up a vibe from the interview that this particular place seems to go through staff somewhat frequently. Might just have been my paranoia! Thanks again for your thoughts!

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4,412 Posts; 33,933 Profile Views

Careful, remember they KNOW it's your license -- not theirs. If something happens (it will) they will point all fallout right at you and state that they are not medical professionals. They hired you for that.

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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Frankly, I wouldn't work for anyone stupid enough to hire a new grad for a supervisory position.

I recommend saying "No" if they offer you the job. Why set yourself up for failure and get your career off to a bad start?

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12 Posts; 646 Profile Views

Just came from the interview. I found out that all RN and LPN jobs at this particular facility are "manager" positions, which means that the person hired oversees 3 CNAs for between 15-20 patients on the unit. This seems like a very strange place for a new grad to start. I think I'm going to pass. How can one learn nursing skills while trying to pass meds on that many patients AND oversee/delegate CNA responsibilities? I'm out of the loop as far as nursing homes, but is this common practice? I guess I could see if I had a couple years of experience, but as a new grad? Nope.

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

6 Followers; 13,266 Posts; 59,581 Profile Views

My guess is that they have given the staff nurses the title of "manager" so that they can classify them as "management." The employment laws are different for "supervisors" than they are for "workers" and they probably want to avoid some of the requirements that apply to the worker category.

Believe it or not, employers are allowed to "abuse" mangers more than they are staff. Over the years, labor unions have won protections for workers that don't apply to their managers. Those protections have been built into the laws so that they apply to all businesses, even those that are non-union.

Yep, It looks to me that that employer wants to categorize the staff nurses into the management category when it comes to the employment laws -- and that's a bad thing because it means they don't want to treat the staff well.

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

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Just came from the interview. I found out that all RN and LPN jobs at this particular facility are "manager" positions, which means that the person hired oversees 3 CNAs for between 15-20 patients on the unit. This seems like a very strange place for a new grad to start. I think I'm going to pass. How can one learn nursing skills while trying to pass meds on that many patients AND oversee/delegate CNA responsibilities? I'm out of the loop as far as nursing homes, but is this common practice? I guess I could see if I had a couple years of experience, but as a new grad? Nope.

*** That patient / cna load actually sound kind of light. Should be no problem at all for a new grad with a couple weeks orientation. I doubt you will find another long term care job with such a low number of residents you are responsible for.

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169 Posts; 4,443 Profile Views

Just came from the interview. I found out that all RN and LPN jobs at this particular facility are "manager" positions, which means that the person hired oversees 3 CNAs for between 15-20 patients on the unit. This seems like a very strange place for a new grad to start. I think I'm going to pass. How can one learn nursing skills while trying to pass meds on that many patients AND oversee/delegate CNA responsibilities? I'm out of the loop as far as nursing homes, but is this common practice? I guess I could see if I had a couple years of experience, but as a new grad? Nope.

This is exactly how it worked at every LTC facility I've worked at and done clinicals at. Except there were usually 30-35 residents per nurse. Completely do-able after orientation.

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135 Posts; 4,514 Profile Views

I would take it. Never worked LTC, but I know from posts on here that you have a decent ratio. Also, supervising CNA's in part of a nurses job. They help us, but we are ultimately responsible for the pt. Last, this is not the job the market to be too picky. If you were strictly managing and not practicing as a RN that's different. You have to walk in the shoes of those you supervise. Just keep in mind that it is not easy to get a job as a new grad and any experience is better than nothing at all.

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