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Too Smart for Rehab Nursing

Rehabilitation   (44,232 Views 61 Comments)
by Lola77 Lola77 (Member)

Lola77 specializes in Neuro/Med-Surg.

6,521 Profile Views; 102 Posts

You are reading page 5 of Too Smart for Rehab Nursing. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

mom2cka specializes in FNP.

329 Posts; 9,691 Profile Views

I just finished a poster & training piece for other nurses about what we do - and one piece was - we give the time to let the patients do it on their own. That's one thing that people seem to have trouble with - that patience, watching someone struggle - but that's exactly what the patient needs - of course, we step in if needed, but - to go from an inability to do something to getting pants & shoes on, even if it does take 5 times as long as it normally would have - the point is - YOU did it! (the patient, that is)

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LethaChristina has 45 years experience and specializes in psych nursing/certified Parish Nurse.

45 Posts; 2,897 Profile Views

That's for sure! Medicine is so often based on "quick fixes" that hardly anything gets "fixed"... as a Parish Nurse, I just have to say, "if one-by-one is good enough for God, it is good enough for me!" (meaning, the time spent comes back in innumerable abundances of grace/healing).

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kathy48 has 12 years experience and specializes in Psychiatric/ER/Primary Clinic/Addiction.

28 Posts; 1,805 Profile Views

I have also only worked LTC/Rehab since graduating from BSN school in 2006. I was immediately put into a supervisory role due to being the only RN in the building on 3-11. I was a fresh graduate and needed to learn fast how to manage a team of nursing professionals, yes, CNA and LPN, and learn all of the auditing and responsibility of manager on duty as well as the high acuity of some of the patients. It was a 92 bed facility and at different ends of the building I would have concurrent emergent scenarios. My point being, there is no shortage of emergency situations, and the prior poster was correct, there is no equipment other than oxygen and the talent that lay in those walls to care for the patient until transport to the ACF can be made. :yeah:

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520 Posts; 7,756 Profile Views

LOL...It's funny...whenever you are good at your job, people tell you you are too good for it.

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Debbie Diener has 32 years experience and specializes in Acute Rehab and Peds.

2 Posts; 758 Profile Views

I have been a CRRN (Certified Rehabilitation Registered Nurse) for 17 years and I still remember how hard that test was. There is nothing easy about acute rehab physically or mentally. If you love rehab stay there. We need GOOD rehab nurses. Somebody has to be the cheerleader and I am glad to do it. What a wide range of outcomes we get to be a part of. I didn't get into nursing to prove how smart I am. If people think you are too smart for acute rehab it makes me wonder what their motives are for nursing.

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75 Posts; 1,940 Profile Views

I'm excited about to begin my career as a rehab nurse in a sub acute hospital. I do believe that this specialty encompasses all area of nursing including; psych, med-surg, oncology, cva's etc. I look forward to beginning my new career as a new nurse. I bring to this facility a zest for knowledge and a zeal to help. Thank all of you for your input. Peace and God Bless Rehab Nurses. I am proud to join your rank.

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50 Posts; 2,231 Profile Views

Thank you all so much for the insight into rehab nursing! :) Im a brand new graduate, and I'm going to be working in a subacute rehab facility. I'd gotten the "too smart for that go into ICU" speech before. I thought I had to go into critical care if I ever expected to get off to a good start in nursing practice. However, after reading these posts from all you great RN's out there is see that there's NOTHING defective about not going into ICU.:idea: I don't plan to stay in rehab forever, but i will work as hard as I can at it and learn as much as a can from it. Thank you all for renewing that thirst for knowledge in me, and reminding me that a nurses work is important no matter what field he or she is in.:nurse: Nursing school kinda makes you a little biased in that regard, and I'm glad I get the opportunity to experience something other than the path of med/surg and ICU.

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beckster_01 has 12 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in MICU.

1 Article; 499 Posts; 16,542 Profile Views

You are not a full-fledged nurse yet, yet you have a wonderful attitude that alot of nurses do not share. Some look down on other specialties while forgetting it is ALL about the patient. There are many nurses who show "lateral violence or aggression". Check out this term and you will see how some nurses, especially, seasoned nurses "eat their young".!!:)

http://www.nursingworld.org/mods/mod440/lateralfull.htm

(P.S. I used to work for the 2nd best-ranking rehab hospital in the Nation and saw first-hand literally miraculous recoveries due to the collaborative efforts of the team. So, before, rehab nursing is "pooh-poohed" one should find out more!)

Ah good old horizontal violence. I actually did a project on that sophomore year (which was actually one of the more fun projects that I've done...we made videos and demonstrated various ways that nurses might "eat their young). Anyways, it was a great project for me to do because I tend to be oversensitive to people's verbal/non-verbal criticism. Learning about this topic helped me learn how to recognize and handle this kind of behavior so it doesn't wear me down.

Anyways that doesn't have much to do with rehab nursing but I do want to encourage people to read some articles about HV because even in my 2 short years as a tech it is sadly very much alive

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1,727 Posts; 15,457 Profile Views

Just wanted to update everyone that I got a job in a free-standing, very well-known acute rehab hospital. (I just graduated in May 2010.) I will start orientation on my unit (brain injury) this week. I keep pinching myself to make sure it is real! I feel so lucky.

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TexasJiffy has 12 years experience and specializes in rehab, med-surg, critical care, telemetr.

7 Posts; 653 Profile Views

Ugh...gotta love thos who don't really know what rehab is all about. It's a unique crossroad where nursing, education and therapy all collide! I spend most days being a cheerleader, somedays educating pts and families about everything from meds to transfers, to sex, and other days accomplishing transfers with pts others had given up all hope on. Is it backbreaking? Yes! Is it heartbreaking sometimes? Yes! But it is so worth it to see that CVA pt lift their pinky finger on what was a flaccid hand, or the TBI pt sit through an entire meal without cursing or hitting someone. Then there's the SCI that caths themself for the first time, allowing them to go home vs the nursing home at 35 years old. I feel like I am making a difference--not just stabilizing and discharging. This is what nursing wa supposed to be--embrace it! If rehab is what you feel pulled to, it is where you should be. Good luck!:nurse:

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1,727 Posts; 15,457 Profile Views

What city will you be working?

Philly.

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