This might make you think twice about which nursing school to go to

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cardiacRN2006

cardiacRN2006, ADN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac. 4,105 Posts

I'm missing the point? Why because I question your absolute judgement? You definitely have a lot to learn. Number one, you're not always right. Number two, stop being so condescending to those who disagree with you or offer a differing opinion. Number three, ... oh never mind. I've been around long enough to know when a case is hopeless. No offense.:smokin:

Wow! Note to yourself: Thin skin will not get you far in nursing!

Lol, your post made me laugh out loud when I read it! Thank you for that. :lol2:I didn't realize there were so many fragile egos around here. You might want to look into why a post on a discussion board makes you so angry...

VR8221

VR8221

3 Posts

I went to Nursing school in Sacramento CA at one of the toughest nursing schools in all of California, the notoriouse Sacramento City College. In fact some people here in Northern California joke that they don't make nurses at Sac City they make Marines who also know nursing. All the joking aside, the school was very challenging and our class valadictorian had a cumulative B- grade, the rest of us had C averages. Yet when we went to take the NCLEX exam all of us passed on our first attempt. Sac City had no problem telling me before I signed up, when I asked the administrators about their first attempt pass rate, what it was for their school and they also told me there are reasons why they have had a 100% first attempt pass rate for the 8 years prior to my going there. I cannot imagine why they would not do that in AZ unless they were somehow embarrassed to say what their pass rate is.

vflipo

vflipo

43 Posts

haha uop went from 22 to 100... what a jump. only 3 test takers in 2008? ... probably because it costs more than it's worth to go there...

markas214

markas214

43 Posts

Wow! Note to yourself: Thin skin will not get you far in nursing!

Lol, your post made me laugh out loud when I read it! Thank you for that. :lol2:I didn't realize there were so many fragile egos around here. You might want to look into why a post on a discussion board makes you so angry...

Whatever.

jamonit

jamonit

Specializes in retail NP. Has 6 years experience. 295 Posts

I went to EBSN and was in the second graduating class. I am a PICC nurse at a well respected hospital, live in Tucson and have worked at the Mayo clinic (actually where I started as a new nurse). I am now enrolled in a very competitive nurse practitioner program in town. Graduating from EBSN has never hurt me as a professional. I continue to make straight A's in grad school and look forward to earning a DNP one day.:)

dorimar

dorimar, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, Education. Has 25 years experience. 635 Posts

My gosh! People forget that there are different perspectives because people have had different experiences and well... different perspectives from various roles.

I have been a nurse a long time. I see some really good experienced nurses and some really bad experienced nurses. I see some really good new nurses and some really bad new nurses.

But what has remained constant, is that while there are some good nurses in our profession, there are some bad nurses too, and some of the experienced or semi-experienced bad nurses are teaching new nurses bad practice. So I decided to go into teaching.

I thought I could instill the importance of excellence in nursing--show students what a difference their care could make (or not...more importantly). But I also remembered nursing school (as long ago as it was), and I remember being so stressed over passing and making the grade, that I did not really learn anything really about nursing until after I graduated and started practicing. So I wanted to make that experience different for nursing students. I focus on the learning. I treat them like the adults they are. I give my students that respect. They will be my colleagues very soon.

However, there are those few that would take a mile when given an inch and who do not afford me the same respect I do them. There are the few who routinely have the requests for late allowances, or excuses for why they don't know the meds or patho on their patient, or who think the test was too difficult rather than that they should have known the material because they will actually need to know it to practice safely... There are some mouthy cocky people who are students and who try my patience and who actually ruin it for the majority that want to really learn and appreciate a teacher that really wants to teach them.... There are those that expect the degree because they paid the tuition. If they can't pass a dosage calc test and can't do the math, they are angry that they were tested on it even though it is basic knowledge & skill required to practice safely. There are those that complain about having to know info, but complain when I take the time to really teach them and make them think in class & never take me up on my open office hours or my practice stuff I send out-& still complain that we expect too much to expect them to know this basic knowledge/skill required for entry level safe practice .

I do realize that these are not the majority. However, they are the squeaky wheel. It is hell being a teacher.... I get accused of being an "easy A" and get accused of expecting too much all in the same quarter.... and all I really expect is for the student to be safe and accountable and understand the importance of knowing.... I never thought adults needed to be treated like children to get them to do what they should.... But I am learning that in this-day-and age... limits need to be set and enforced because some adults are not internally motivated.

So... even the best teachers look bad to some students.

And our perspectives do change with different experiences and roles. I try very hard to keep looking at it from all perspectives, but I have learned to set limits and rules and enforce them. I do expect safe practice, and I do expect my students to leave me knowing ! that is the main reason I went into teaching. If I have to be more strict or more of a hard-ass with adults than I have to be with my teenage son, well then so be it....

Edited by dorimar
typo

MandaTaye

MandaTaye

98 Posts

Personally,

I had to comment.

Nursing school is the hardest thing I've ever done period, as I assume most of you agree. I have encountered wonderful nurses, but majority of the time even the CNA's are disrespectful to us. Angry because we have to use their glucometers instead of being grateful that we took a patient off of their load. Nurses who make us wait 30 minutes to get report on one patient. Ridiculous stuff like that. I do feel sometimes that my status as a student is being tested. Heck, even the patients remark about how i'm "learning" everytime I go into their room. You feel small. You don't know enough and it personally gives me a great deal of anxiety. OF course there are instructors some places who like to exert their power in negative ways to embarass or overwhelm a student purposefully to make themselves feel better. I have seen them. I know there are bigger picture lessons here but making middle-aged second career adults cry by demeaning them nonconstructively in front of their peers is hard.

You have to remember, that when you're a nurse it's a LOT different from nursing school so there's a better capacity for stress, but as a student you're broke, socially isolated, overwhelmed, fatigued, anxious, etc. I think you can get those lessons across in gentler ways. We need to remember our core foundation of caring for each other which thankfully, i've also been able to witness several times throughout school.

I also agree that condescending others advice is nontherapeutic. Remember therapeutic communication techniques???

Anyway, just wanted to bring some reality back into the picture. We're allowed two absences from January - May in clinical and we go twice a week. They allow NO tardies. Two weeks ago I had snow on my car and was on outrotation. My mapquest sent me to the wrong entrance that was four miles away from the right one. 5 minutes late and I had to go home. Gas tank on E anyway, and I cried the whole way home. That means I can only miss one more day from now (February) to May or have one tardy and everything I've done means nothing. Is that really reasonable considering you have single mothers who have to hire babysitters to watch their children who may be late?? As a nurse, you could afford daycare. I wonder how many patients were exposing forcing our students to go regardless if theyre sick or healthy. If they have no absences left they're going to go. What if one day they open the paper and so and so died on their way to clnical cause they didn't want all those nights without sleep to mean nothing?

Compassion.

Let's get back to a LITTLE of that.

This is my personal opinion and even if I did have the time to debate any of this i'm too tired. Just my two cents.

kattvenus73

kattvenus73

15 Posts

Amen!

Double AMEN!

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